How to adjust compressor air pressure when machine lacks adjustment knob?

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Which automatic drain valve did you use Ed? While we're at it - what will you use if you have to replace it rather than repair it?
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On 10 Feb 2005 10:46:22 GMT, the inscrutable Ed Clarke

I can see why larger compressors, which would suit a production shop and beg for distribution, might have no regulators, but I can't see why smaller ones wouldn't come with them unless reeeeeeeally cheap.

Like, bummer, dude.
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You got it. Save a buck to be more competitive. I'm not sure where you draw the line, but my PC pancake has a regulator and I never run more than one tool. If I had distribution, I'd rather have the regulation closer to the tool. this is common practice to assure adequate air at the point of use. Ed
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wrote:

FWIW, I picked up a $20 inline regulator at Coastal, added quick connects, and plug it in right at the tool. I leave the compressor @ 105-110 PSI, and adjust at the tool.
It's really a handy setup and well worth the $20.
Barry
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On Sat, 12 Feb 2005 02:30:04 GMT, Ba r r y

I sometimes run a 15g finish nailer and a 18g brad nailer for the same assembly. I regulate at the compressor to what the 15 wants, then ad a T and regulate one leg with an inline regulator to what the 18 wants. easy and cheap to set up, works great.
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On Sat, 12 Feb 2005 11:05:50 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@all.costs wrote:

I use it on everything, as I'm too lazy to walk back to the compressor. <G> If I'm out of the shop, there's a good chance that the compressor may not even be on the same floor. Usually it's in a basement or garage, and I'm too floors up!
Barry
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Yes there may be an adjustment in the pressure switch. If you take the cover off of it there will be a nut or screw with a spring under it, backing off the screw will lower the pressure. That said, the switch adjustment is probably welded so you can not adjust it, my Porter Cable compressor is! If you need to get the discharge pressure lower buy a air regulator. Greg
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You realize that if you do this the compressor will probably run almost always with most any use at all.
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On 7 Feb 2005 18:51:39 -0800, the inscrutable snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com spake:

That's the pressure limit switch. Air pressure opens and closes the switch to the motor depending upon high and low pressures. Most decent compressors also have a built-in unloader which permits the motor to start the compressor with no pressure in the compressor head.
There are usually 2 screw controls in a pressure switch, one for high cutoff, the other for low pressure re-engage.

Generally, the pressure switches are adjusted downward by rotating the screw counterclockwise. If it were mine, I'd unplug it, pop the plastic cover off, loosen the locknut, adjust the HI screw (they're usually marked) 1/4 turn counterclockwise, retighten the locknut.
Then I'd run air pressure in the tank down to about 80 psi, plug it back in, turn it on, and look at both pressures, high and low, for the results. I'd then proceed from there, knowing the correct direction to adjust.
Good luck!
P.S: Play with this at your own risk. If you're not comfy doing it, take the compressor down to most any auto or compressor mechanic and give him a few bucks to adjust it for you.
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