how to adjust Blum hinges

I'm installing Blum, full inset clip-on hinges. I've figured out how to adjust the hinges so the doors hang square in the opening, (height, width) with same reveal all the way around the doors. I've also adjusted so the hinged side is flush with the cabinet sides. Three screws, three dimensions adjustments, nice and simple.
The problem, however, is that when the doors close, they swing in too far (i.e., past perpendicular to the sides). Is there a way to adjust how far the door swings, or do I need to install a catch? It seem like the hinges should stop swinging at 90 degrees without the use of a stop.
Thanks in advance for the help.
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my hinges came with some adhesive back rubber pads that act to cushion the door against the frame. They also do exactly what you're asking for - keep the door perpendicular to the sides. I guess this qualifies as a sort of "stop", but it's a pretty unobtrusive one.
I've installed only a few dozen of these hinges, but they all do NOT stop at exactly 90 degrees when you adjust the hinge in/out from the cabinet face. The best way to avoid needing a stop that I've found is to keep the gap as small as possible and still be able to open the door without rubbing.
Mike

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Blum hinges are designed to fit the door on the outside of the carcass, it sounds like you've used them to fit inside in some way and the spring would naturally take them beyond perpendicular if there was nothing to stop it, so the carcass should be the stop, often little plastic pads are added to cushion ,,,,, but it sounds like you have no stop.
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Blum and all european hinges do need an absolute stop, If you do not have one then sooner or later you will ultimately break the hinge by pushing in to far.
The hinge is designed for many applications, inset, on top called full overlay, and on top half overlay. This is accomplished by either the hinge, the plate or a combination of the two, they also have angled hinges, angled plates and a lot of odd varieties, each brand has it own complexities and various differant adjustments, the basics are about the same for all of them.
The hinges swing open to a wide assortment of Degree's from 95 or 96 to 165and they all appear to close at about 85 degree, which does change depending on the cranking you do with the hinge adjsutments.
35 mm being the standard bore for the cup, but for thicker doors they have some that are a 40mm cup bore, and a smaller hinge due to a small frame of a glass door they have a 26 mm cup.
They can be quite intimidating at times, but you do not have to follow each manufactures specifications, these are not the max limits there are many ways to exceed what they tell you can do. It just takes some trial and error on some scrap wood to get there.
Good luck, George

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Out of curiosity, did you use a jig to get the mounting just right? If so, did you make it or buy one of the blum jigs made by various vendors?
Erik

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