how tight should a TS blade be tightened

My Mg Skil worm drive saw manual said not to overtighten, in fact you wanted it to slip in case of overload OR emergency, can't remember which.
So I add a little of this into my arm memory, but I really have no idea. Hasn't stopped spinning yet, even with my finger in it. Can you say nail clippers.
Ps a lot of companies have copied the Skil worm saw. Was it orig. Is it (still) good/the best. Are the others better?
Why the heck are cheap circ saw built for left-handers? Is it because it's the only motors readily available?
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Doubtful, since the bolt should tighten if it meets any resistance. If it doesn't you've got trouble. Not to mention a lot of the 7 1/4 blades uesd a diamond cutout with no slip possible.

Sure, just ask the manufacturers. Mine's a hypoid drive, works as friendly as the Skil that convinced me an in-line was the way to go.

They're built for right handers. Just look at the lock button on the trigger.
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I forgot about that diamond, I am womdering where from that info came now.
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[some snippage]

You're probably leaping to a conclusion that because many (and for many years, virtually all) circular saws have the blade on the right hand side that they're built for left handers.
However, it's only in recent years that using circular saws for other purposes than cutting framing lumber came into much more of a vogue than rarely. Consider a job site with a couple of sawhorses and a pile of 2x awaiting trimming. Assume you're right handed. You step up to the pile with the waste side of the mark to the right, you put your left knee up on the board, and/or put your left hand on the board, and holding the saw in your right hand, with the body of the saw sitting on the keep side of the line, you whack off the waste. All is right in the universe. It's the safest, most practical way to make that cut with that saw. Consequently, that right side bladed saw is designed for right handers.
Yes, the cut line is on the opposite side of the saw from your body. That, however, is a small price to pay to be able to have the keep side of the work support the weight of the saw, while at the same time being positioned and restrained by your free hand.
Now, consider the new fangled left side blade. In the scenario above, you can still use your knee and/or free hand to support the keep side of the wood, but the saw is resting on the waste side of the (readily visible, admittedly) cut line, necessitating some weight/balance gymnastics as the saw completes the cut.
No, that saw is designed for a left hander, although since left handers customarily get short shrift in tool design (I'm a righty, pandering to the left handed audience here) no one ever built a "left handed" saw until sometime in the last ten or so years.
Nowadays, people are using circular saws for much more than cutting framing material, such as dimensioning sheet goods, for example, and the setup therein provides ample support for the body of the saw, and tips the balance in favor of having the cut line on the visible side of the saw body. Thus, the blade on the left saw oxymoronically built for right handers.
So, there's why your "left handed saw" hypothesis is faulty and why we came to have blades on the right on right handed saws.
--
LRod

Master Woodbutcher and seasoned termite
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I guess you are telling me it is for safety and convenience. I like to see what I am ripping or crosscutting, and I can't do it on a reg saw unless I am standing on one leg and balancing the weight of my body with the weight of the running saw, OR holding the saw with my left hand OR both. I don't use it a lot. If the reg saw had the blade on the other side, I would have paid 1/4 the price. I couldn't even see the line any other way. I can find support if I need it. I don't doubt that with practice I could come close to the line. Not for me, not for a second. I prefer to rip a 6' fence board in the air freehand.
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this has got me a little flipped out.
You are saying eithere forget the line. make a new line on the L of the saw housing, or stand off the scrap end and push sideways.
Maybe its the stable keep side supporting the saw as the waste falls off, the saw is supported. I'd rather use a little wrist twist, or anything else opposite of what is req'd.when the blade and line is hidden unless you're a contortionist.
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I just can't see the blade through the housing, maybe you can live with that, but if somehow I got my head to see on th eblade side of a reg saw, then the line is on the other side of the blade, and you can't see the current angle of reference.
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