How Square is Your Square: A dial indicator method

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On Jan 4, 12:26 pm, snipped-for-privacy@slp53.sl.home (Scott Lurndal) wrote:

Which is as good as a foot for a luthier, who works to within 0.004" or better.
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Better watch out, next yhing you know Steve Strickland will be back explaining how to cut a board to 1/1000 of an inch on his tablesaw... :)
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Make it as simple as possible, but not simpler. (Albert Einstein)

Larry Wasserman - Baltimore Maryland - lwasserm(a)sdf. lonestar. org
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snipped-for-privacy@sdf.lNoOnSePsAtMar.org (Larry W) wrote in

Oh, my. I'm surprised anyone remembers that. IIRC, though, Steve was claiming +/- 0.0001, not 0.001, wasn't he?
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You're right, after I hit the "send" key I realized I should have written 1/10000.
--
When the game is over, the pawn and the king are returned to the same box.

Larry Wasserman - Baltimore Maryland - lwasserm(a)sdf. lonestar.org
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On Jan 4, 6:35 pm, snipped-for-privacy@sdf.lNoOnSePsAtMar.org (Larry W) wrote:

Norris smoother.
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Notes on the UKP-03 Concert Ukulele Plan, Scott E. Antes 2006/2012: "The concert ukulele, in general, does not require particularly close tolerances. The major exception to this statement is the fret spacing. The careful builder will hold fret spacing closer than 0.004 in., or .10 mm."
Overall instrument size doesn't much matter -- what does, is how well parts are fit together. Musical instruments are machines. Last banjo I did a major rebuild on went from sounding tinny and noisy to loud and punchy simply by reseating the parts for a closer fit.
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On 1/4/2013 11:26 AM, Scott Lurndal wrote:

LOL... Is this why you never post any of your work? I don't find 32's of an inch tolerances acceptable in woodworking. If you want multiple width and length pieces to fit precisely within a given constraint you have to do a lot better than 32's. A whole lot better.
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On Friday, January 4, 2013 3:56:14 PM UTC-5, Leon wrote:

Tight fitting half lap joints are sloppy with a 1/32" gap.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v
¾xGi9HbLSM
Not to mention the need for higher standards w/ regard to inlay and banding.
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On 1/4/2013 3:15 PM, snipped-for-privacy@garagewoodworks.com wrote:

This stack of 8 muntins were made with the aid of my kerfmaker. And each is 5/32" thick total after drum sanding. The joints are 5/64" deep.
http://www.flickr.com/photos/lcb11211/4287396695/in/set-72157622991960362/lightbox /
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On 1/4/2013 2:56 PM, Leon wrote:

Reminds me of a job we participated in last year where the inset door/drawer reveal was 3/32", or else.
Thank gawd for those poly shims ....
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On Thu, 3 Jan 2013 13:58:44 -0800 (PST), snipped-for-privacy@garagewoodworks.com wrote:

square using a dial indicator. The method works in theory. I've tried it and it seems to work in practice. A caveat is that the square needs a thick edge to support a stylus.

Are you off your meds again?
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On Thursday, January 3, 2013 10:05:16 PM UTC-5, Gordon Shumway wrote:

square using a dial indicator. The method works in theory. I've tried it and it seems to work in practice. A caveat is that the square needs a thick edge to support a stylus.

Too complex for you I know. I'll dumb it down for you next time.
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On Thu, 3 Jan 2013 13:58:44 -0800 (PST), snipped-for-privacy@garagewoodworks.com wrote:

square using a dial indicator. The method works in theory. I've tried it and it seems to work in practice. A caveat is that the square needs a thick edge to support a stylus.

Just my 2 cents; I think many of the people here are missing one of Brian's points (if not more). If you check out Brian's web site he uses his reference square as much for machine setup as anything else. With some good reference tools, such as that square he is checking, a dial indicator, straight edge and a few other items he has methods that allows him to quickly set up his table saw or whatever with high accuracy. Or to verify that it remains set up properly.
Which is a worthwhile goal.
For that to work it is best if the reference square is within a couple of thousanths along entire the beam.
Can you use the draw and flip method to verify a reference square to that accuracy? I can't think of how.
With a reference square you can also easily verify your other working squares. Which I like to do if I drop one.
Does everybody need to work like Brian does? No, but I suggest there's nothing wrong with it, since overall it saves him time.
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On 1/4/2013 2:02 PM, Jim Weisgram wrote:

square using a dial indicator. The method works in theory. I've tried it and it seems to work in practice. A caveat is that the square needs a thick edge to support a stylus.

Seriously it sound like Brian has a good method to check your master square if you are doing that much in the shop you need at least one master square of that accuracy.
Personally I don't own a gauge of that precision, as in my amateur work I would not know what to do with it if I did.
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