How sharp is sharp !!!

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In a recent sharpening article in FWW magazine the author stated that he regularly polishes down to 3 microns and at times down to 1 micron [.000039"].
In response to the article a reader infers this level of sharpening is ridiculous, I personally agree.
My logic is that a one micron edge will crumble in the case of highly tempered steel and at least deform in lower tempered steel cutting edges . the edges will continue to do so until they can sustain the localized bearing pressure due to use . In turn the local bearing pressure will depend on the force applied to the cutting edge, the hardness of the material being cut and lastly the bevel angle of the edge.
The only way these tolerances would work is if the material was infinitely strong we are nowhere near that level probably the closest thing we have to that is diamond.
The other assertion was the finely polished edges hold their edge longer. I am never quite sure about this .A finely ground edge will result in a even cutting edge which in turn will result in the whole cutting edge taking the load and thus reducing the overall edge stresses [and wear]. On the other hand edge ridges on the cutting edge due to a lesser degree of honing will break down due to higher local stresses until the stresses at the cutting edge are even out.
Polishing the back of the bevel may reduce frictional resistance of the tool when in use. If this is true microbevels make sense [a double bevel, the small secondary bevel close to the cutting edge ]. So instead of spending hours polishing the whole bevel, hone a fine microbevel and simply buff out remaining bevel with jewelers rouge .
-- mike hide
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I think I read that article, too, and I thought he was talking about the type of polishing compound or sandpaper he used when stating the 3 micron or 1 micron, not the thickness of the polished edge. I agree with you that polishing to a 1 micron edge thickness is silly. But, using a very fine grit to polish with makes a lot of sense and I'm almost 100% sure this is what the author was saying.
Mike
--
There are no stupid questions.
There are a LOT of inquisitive idiots.
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Personally, I always sharpen my tools to one atomic diameter, as verified by my electron microscope. I'm saving up for a Grizzly Atomic Force Microscope so I can arrange a line of diamond atoms across the final edge. That way I'll be able to let gravity do all the work, and I can sit back with a beer and watch. -- Ernie
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wrote:

After careful consideration of the above I've decided to go subatomic with my sharpening regimen.
I'm thinking that quark size is good and would go for the charmed quarks but they sound too much like a breakfast cereal.
Regards, Tom Tom Watson - Woodworker Gulph Mills, Pennsylvania http://users.snip.net/~tjwatson
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Tom Watson notes:

You mean they're not! Damn. No wonder my stomach is upset.
Charlie Self
"Men willingly believe what they wish." Julius Caesar, De Bello Gallico
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On 08 Sep 2003 16:45:15 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@aol.comnotforme (Charlie Self) wrote:

This is probably a gluon density problem, Charlie.
Has something to do with gas, well - plasma really but how good does that sound?
I'd try a switch to the low-gluon-high-fiber quarks and your gaseous diffusion problem should go away, with the added benefit of more predictable (and more socially acceptable) energy releases.
Bon Appetit.
Regards, Tom Tom Watson - Woodworker Gulph Mills, Pennsylvania http://users.snip.net/~tjwatson
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6000 grit water stone is as far as I go.

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On Mon, 15 Sep 2003 05:29:23 GMT, Steve Knight

I agree with Steve. 6000 is pretty sharp, but you WILL be amazed when you take it up to 8000. I go from 1000, to 4000 and then 8000. I hope you're using a nagura stone to prep stones 4000 and up before honing.
Layne
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I like your thinking Tom. And to extend it a bit (pun intended) up and down quarks would be perfect for spiral router bits.
Art

[snip]
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Mike Hide wrote:

Picking a nit here. Granite is an igneous rock, limestone is sedimentary, and marble is metamorphic(more or less). ARM ;-)
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Alan you might just hit the nail on the head, thats probably been the problem all along....mjh
-- mike hide

sharpening
,
with
.This is

sharpen
igneous
stuff....mjh
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sharpening
,
with
.This is

sharpen
igneous
stuff....mjh
Have you seen the statistics on what the sedimentary lifestyle is doing to our citizens? -- Ernie
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Ernie Jurick writes:

Heh. Sedentary causes settling...sedimentary?
Charlie Self
"Men willingly believe what they wish." Julius Caesar, De Bello Gallico
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Yes, it causes a condition called "ferroplumbic rectitus", the iron in your blood turns to lead and settles in your ass.
-- "Shut up and keep diggen" Jerry
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pixelated:

You know when you've reached the Metal Years: You have gold in your teeth, silver in your hair, lead in your ass, and iron in your Geritol.
--
Where ARE those Weapons of Mass Destruction, Mr. President?
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wrote:

Alimentary, my dear Homey.
Regards, Tom. Thomas J. Watson-Cabinetmaker Gulph Mills, Pennsylvania http://users.snip.net/~tjwatson
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On Tue, 09 Sep 2003 12:00:07 -0700, Tim Douglass

Tim
You made me laugh out loud.
Thanks.
Regards, Tom. Thomas J. Watson-Cabinetmaker Gulph Mills, Pennsylvania http://users.snip.net/~tjwatson
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Alan McClure wrote:

I once had a teacher inform me that granite was indeed Ignatious rock. I'd have corrected her, but I was only nine, and she was a Texan.
Don't ask me how she butchered obsidian.
O'Deen -- http://www.klownhammer.org/ - Home of the World-Famous Original Crowbar FAQ
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On Tue, 09 Sep 2003 16:40:10 -0700, "Patrick Olguin (O'Deen)"

Durned O'Deen.
Don't see so much as a periscope cutting through the water...
He lets go a couple of feesh...
...and sinks back into the murky depths...
(watson goes back to the crows nest and scans the bleak horizon...)
Regards, Tom Tom Watson - Woodworker Gulph Mills, Pennsylvania http://users.snip.net/~tjwatson
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Worse, if you do know which one you sharpened, you can't know where you put it.
There's a section of one of the Discworld novels where Death is sharpening his sythe - starting with stones, and working his way down to through steel, linen, satin, silk, the dawn breeze, and finally the dawn light itself. The blade was sharp enough to cut photons.
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