How powerful a bandsaw motor is powerful enough?

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I am contemplating replacing my 14" bandsaw and tablesaw with a bigger bandsaw. I think I have a handle on the good and bad points of that scheme. (but if you have any profound insights...)
My 14" is 1hp and certainly wouldn't rip fast enough to replace a TS. The bigger ones are 2hp up to 5hp. How big do I have to go before it will rip 4/4 oak satisfactorily? (sure, I cut 8/4 ocassionally, but not often enough to worry about it.) I would prefer to keep it on a 20a circuit, but can certainly put in a 30a circuit if 3hp won't cut it.
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Toller wrote: > I am contemplating replacing my 14" bandsaw and tablesaw with a bigger > bandsaw. > > The > bigger ones are 2hp up to 5hp. How big do I have to go before it will rip > 4/4 oak satisfactorily?
Unless you have 3 phase power, 2HP is about the upper limit.
Lew
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Geez no; you can get 3hp on a 20a circuit and 5hp on a 30a circuit.
One horse is roughly 1200w.
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Toller wrote:
> Geez no; you can get 3hp on a 20a circuit and 5hp on a 30a circuit. > > One horse is roughly 1200w.
Don't give up your day job to go into the electrical business.
At least, not just yet<G>.
Lew
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You mean I don't *really* have a 3HP shop vacuum?
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Dave Balderstone wrote:

Does it have a 182 frame?<G>
Lew
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wrote:

Not unless it is 3600w.
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You don't learn well, do you?

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Lew Hodgett wrote:

Those numbers aren't all that bad. The amerages are reasonable numbers for a 240V motor, as long as the breakers protecting the wires are sized for the startup load.
The wattage number is a bit wonky, though still in the ballpark.
1HP is 746 watts, plus power factor correction, plus efficiency correction.
Chris
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1200w is 10a at 120v. A 1hp motor is typically 10a, 1.5hp 15a, ans 2hp 20a. Then, going into 240v, a 3hp is 15a. The wattage number isn't the least bit wonky. Now some motors are more or less efficient; my 2hp TS motor only draws 17a, but it was 50% more expensive than the same manufacturer's 20a 2hp motor.
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Toller wrote:

I don't think a bandsaw is a good substitute for a tablesaw no matter what the capacity. Personally, I'd upgrade the tablesaw first.
DonkeyHody "If your only tool is a hammer, you tend to see every problem as a nail." - Abraham Maslow
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I have a severe space problem. No room to upgrade the TS. My hope is to upgrade the BS and get rid of the TS. Some people claim it works wonderfully; others agree with you.
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Too damn right it works. I don't own a table saw, I don't want one and I have never needed one. I rather have a couple of narrow assembly tables take up the space. And I worry a lot less about counting my fingers. Between the BS and the Radial Arm I can achieve anything I want to; 8'x4' sheets I cut with the skilly in any event.
Just goes to show how Your Mileage May Vary <grin>
-Peter
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says...

What do you use your RAS for?
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Cross cutting, roughing out lap joints, making tenons. Very very rarely I might rip a weathergroove or do something like that. Mitres are a little tricky cause the forces on the blade tends to deflect the angle on the arm, but then I expect something similar to happen on tablesaws.
-P.
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Peter Huebner wrote:

Like Peter, I don't own a table saw. I just have a 14" bandsaw.
My question is this: How significantly does the motor size impact cutting speed? My saw is 1 HP and I don't feel like I am bogging it down, especially with 4/4 material. I have certainly never even come close to stalling it, even when resawing.
The blade seems to be a much bigger factor. Carbon steel blades dull very quickly and dull blades cut slowly. I noticed a huge improvement when I moved to bi-metal blades.
Mark
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I am taking a turning course at a local HS. They have a 24" Powermatic. With a worn out blade it cuts 12/4 oak like butter. My 14" 1hp would cut it, but much slower and less precisely.
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Well, yeah, but have you _priced_ a 24" Powermatic? ;-) That's one serious wooddorking tool.
The choice of tools in your shop is up to you, and your checkbook, and those who also have some claim on your checkbook. I've come to the conclusion that, for now, I'll find a way to do without a big bandsaw. I miss it, though.
Good luck on the gloat finding.
Patriarch
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Toller wrote:

What kind of blade does the HS have and what kind do you have (material, width, tooth pattern and tpi)? I still think that the blade may be the main difference. If the blades wanders back and forth as you cut, then it is dull. You can watch that happen as you push the wood through the blade.
Also, I have found that if you have some kind of misalignment in the board, fence, or table that will cause the board to bind the blade, that it will be significantly harder to push. I have definitely experienced that when resawing, but I don't think I have ever experienced that with 4/4 stock.
Mark
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Well, guides are more important than teeth in controlling wander, unless someone's dinged the right-set side. It's overall stiffness that counts here, as elsewhere. The tension, thickness of the blade, the width and the guides all go toward making it a saw rather than a floppy piece of metal being dragged through the board.
Within limits, as we know, slowing the feed will allow rotational inertia from a 1/2 horse to cut 6" deep. Did it for years on the old Sears saw. Took a while, though. Wet wood for turning stock could be a real nightmare, but it's no pleasure on the current Delta and one horse, either.
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