How much weight can a wall support (mounting a cabinet on a wall)

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How do you join this screw strip to the cabinet? I've looked through many cabinetry books and articles without finding many details on this connection. Looking at most manufactured kitchen wall cabinets, it appears that the strip just fits between the end panels and squeezes the back panel to the wall. Since the back panel is usually just a stapled-on piece of eighth inch ply or hardboard, I'm unable to see where the strength is.

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Larry Kraus wrote:

The top screw strip should be attached to the top of the cabinet and also at the ends, to each side panel. The bottom one should be attached to the bottom and the sides.
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Properly done, the screw strip is itself screwed into the cabinet top and sides, and to the bottom and sides ... it becomes an integral part of the cabinet construction and _very_ strong.
For additional strength in a cabinet that must hold a lot of weight, I also glue it to the back panel when I install it.
Keep in mind that the back panel in a cabinet made this way is contained in a rabbet that is cut 3/4" from the back edge of the two cabinet sides. If you use a 3/4" thick screw strip, generally about 4 1/2" wide, it fits flush with the back edges of the cabinet.
I'll mention again that if you bevel the bottom edge of the top screw strips before installing it, the strip itself can also be used as the top half of a "French Cleat.
When doing this, I often use a double French cleat and put an additional screw strip in the middle of the back of the cabinet. There is a picture of this double cleat used to install a wall cabinet on my website: one of the journal pages (writing desk).
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means
Look up "french cleat". http://www.newwoodworker.com/frenchcleat.html
If you attach the lower portion of the cleat to the wall studs with lag bolts or large screws (2 or more per stud) and then use additional short screws to simply secure the bottom of the cabinet to the wall, you should be able to hang a couple hundred pounds.
As an example - I built a simple bookshelf for my office - birch ply and a face frame, dadoed and rabbeted and glued. I used a french cleat with four screws, two per stud, and used two more screws (#10 x 3) to secure the bottom. To test, I did a couple of chinups on the shelf. I weigh almost 290 lb. It held. Do it this way and you won't have to worry about any normal amount of weight.
Jon E
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On Sun, 16 Nov 2003 23:53:35 GMT, "Jon Endres, PE"

What amazes me, Jon, is not that the shelf held 290 lbs, but that you, weighing 290 lbs, are able to do a couple of chin ups. I'm only 275 and anything involving lifting my body weight has been out of the question for years.
Tim Douglass
http://www.DouglassClan.com
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wrote:

a
four
Two or three is about all I'm capable of. Always been a big boy, but I've kept myself in marginally good enough shape to do what needs to be done. :) One thing I have worried about, as a volunteer firefighter, is getting into trouble and having my fellow FF's not be able to get me out. Full air pack and gear I tip the scales at almost 340 lbs.
J
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snipped-for-privacy@killspammers.die.die.die.adelphia.net says...

Man, anything happens to you, and your fellow FF's aren't getting you out, they're getting out the barbecue sauce. :-)
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On Mon, 17 Nov 2003 20:55:25 GMT, "Jon Endres, PE"

I remember that. I was a vol. FF for several years before moving. We had a little gal about 120 lbs soaking wet who wanted to work on the hose teams. I refused to work with her because she couldn't even drag me across a smooth concrete floor. If there wasn't someone big enough to make a serious stab at moving me I just stayed out of the structure.
Tim Douglass
http://www.DouglassClan.com
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Tim Douglass wrote:

Yeah, but he has a degree in PE.
Dick
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Hey!
I'm 250 and bicycle 4000 miles a year (on and off road), play roller hockey in the summer and ice hockey in the winter.
I regularily leave mere 170 pounders in the dust on my bikes.
It's a number... <G>
Barry
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On Mon, 17 Nov 2003 23:10:08 GMT, B a r r y B u r k e J r .

You see me in profile and you'll realize it's a *big* number. I use 24" stud spacing because I don't fit between the 16" stuff any more. My wife is a good cook and broadly tolerant of my WW endeavors. Now she has me fattened up to where I can't get away. Last tool purchase discussion involved some statement like "Go ahead and get it, I know you'll make something for me with it." (insert own choice of tone).
Life is good, but I'd love to be 6" smaller around the waist and about 50# lighter for the benefit of the bad knees.
Tim Douglass
http://www.DouglassClan.com
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