How much weight can a wall support (mounting a cabinet on a wall)

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Keep_it_in_the_newsgroup snipped-for-privacy@aol.com says...

But that's a torsional force, not shear force.
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Mark & Juanita wrote:

Shear occurs in torsion too.
Dick
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Lots of armchair engineers in the audience lately. The primary failure mode of a circular member in torsion is by shear stress. There's a difference in a shear force and a shear stress.
todd
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(Charlie Self)

No, but the *slightest* bit of bending during maximum shear load will cause failure. There's only one thing drywall screws are good for, and that's hanging drywall. If an in-duh-vidual is too cheap to spring for a box of decent screws to support some weight, the in-duh-vidual deserves to have their project fall apart.
Jon E - just say (tmPL) I took a ingineering class once....
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: Mark Jerde asks:
:>Charlie Self wrote: :> :>> Do NOT use drywall screws. :> :>Why is that? :>
: They're brittle, so their shear strength is poor.
This is absolutely true. But I've never known why. So ... why are drywall screws so hard and brittle? They're designed to go through drywall, which is not very hard, and then softwood 2xs.
Anyone know?
    -- Andy Barss
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wrote:

Don't forget that they're also designed to be drilled into a metal stud. Perhaps they are as hard as they are to be able to drill through the steel.
todd
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todd responds:

Might be, except I think drywall screws pre-date metal studs by quite a few years.
And it has never bothered fastener manufacturers to put out an extra product or two to cover things like metal studs. The confusion factor is not theirs, it's ours.
Charlie Self
"If a politician found he had cannibals among his constituents, he would promise them missionaries for dinner." H. L. Mencken
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On 26 Nov 2003 09:22:20 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@aol.comnotforme (Charlie Self) brought forth from the murky depths:

Don't they use self-drilling drywall screws for metal studs? That sounds like a new product.
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Andrew Barss wrote:

So you twist lots of heads off and have to buy more screws?
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They are quite brittle. They tend to snap.

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Thank you very much!! It is very appreciated. I will follow your advice.
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On 16 Nov 2003 00:10:26 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@aol.comnotforme (Charlie Self) wrote:

If the stud spacing doesn't match the best places to put screws in the cabinets, he could install blocking as follows.
Thickness some 4" wide hardwood to the same thickness as the existing wall board. Remove 4x? horizontal strips of drywall. Install horizontal 2x4 spanners between studs, flush with the fronts of the exposed studs. Glue and screw the one-piece hardwood runners to the exposed studs and newly installed blocks. Screw the cabinets to the hardwood blocking. This will allow the cabinetry to be installed with the screws in the best places.
As Charlie says, use "real" wood screws, not brittle drywall screws. Simply hitting the studs as Charlie described will be plenty strong, but sometimes you need the blocking to do the job right.
Barry
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Mannanan MacLir wrote:

As Charlie said you want the screws secured in the wall studs. If the studs placement doesn't work for the cabinet a "French cleat" might help. See:
http://benchmark.20m.com/plans/FrenchCleat.pdf
-- Jack Novak Buffalo, NY - USA (Remove "SPAM" from email address to reply)
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Charlie's got ya covered.
dave
Mannanan MacLir wrote:

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Mannanan MacLir wrote:

I don't know what that "French cleat" flummy Jack was talking about is. It may be what I'm about to describe.
I had to hang an obscenely heavy mirror in my dining room. It's a huge, thick piece of glass fastened to an ornate wooden backing with mirror clips.
It needed to be in the center of the wall, needed to span as many studs as possible, and had to be screwed behind the glass. The way I tackled that was to lag screw two 2x3 strips so that they spanned three or four studs. I did chin-ups on the strips a couple of times to prove to myself that they could take the weight (the mirror weighs a lot, but I weigh more :) and then I lag screwed the wooden backing to the strips in convenient places. Put the glass on, and it's held up for years.
You could do the same kind of thing for a cabinet easily. If you have any doubts about the weight, add it up and talk to your local building inspector.
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Silvan wrote:

Hang 1000 lb on two wall studs in a standard 8 foot high wall with the cg 6 inches out from the wall. That results in a 95 psi compressive load on the studs which is approximately insignificant. It also results in a force of about 35 lbs at the top of each stud pulling each stud out from the wall. All he needs to be concerned about is adequately securing the cabinets to the studs. The wall itself is no sweat.
Rico
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You should specify what "normal" walls are. Wooden walls as in the U.S. are quite different from the normal brick or concrete walls in Europe, where they are certainly up to the task, IF you are able to anchor the screws well. So first tell what kind of a wll you have.
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What part of the world are you in? Makes a big difference on the answer to your question.
You did build your cabinet, destined for wall use, with built-in screw strips, didn't you?
I build both wall and base units, which must be attached to a wall, with at least an upper and lower 3/4" thick screw strip that sits flush between the back panel and back edge of the cabinet sides.
TIP: If you bevel the bottom part of the TOP screw strip, it will also do double duty it as the top half of a "French cleat'.
Here in the US, where most construction is wooden frame, I use deck or drywall screws for the LOWER screw strips of my cabinets, screwed into studs or blocking.
BUT, I _always_ screw at least two 3 1/2" lag bolts, using the TOP screw strip of the cabinet, the number depending upon the width of the cabinet, into at least two studs, or the blocking between the studs.
On a 48" wide cabinet, I would use 3 lag bolts on the TOP screw strip, one in the middle and the other two evenly spaced toward the sides.
Fastened thusly at the TOP screw strip, you can use just about any type of screw, drywall or otherwise in the lower screw strips and the cabinet will handle all the weight for which it was designed.
I recently started using "French cleats", but I still like the lag bolts in the top screw strip for peace of mind, particularly when I do work for someone besides myself ... not to mention possible liability issues.
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[...]

[...]
What is the use of the lower screw strip? The upper one bears the weight, keeps the cabinit from falling. The lower would just keep it from lifting off the wall, which it would have to do against gravity; Most wall-hanging cabinets from furniture shops come with only the upper mounting option...
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Around here, mainly to keep the leveling wedges from falling out, and lets you get away with actually using all those drywall screws you have on hand from another project. ;>)
IME, using the bottom screw strips helps in pulling the cabinet tightly against the wall, helps with rigidity of the unit, and aids in leveling a line of cabinets when part of a wall of cabinets fastened together.
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