How much weight can a wall support (mounting a cabinet on a wall)

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I am building an oak cabinet, roughly 48 inches wide, 30 high, and 10 deep which will contain glassware. I want to wall mount this unit, and I was wondering if (normal) walls are up to the task, and what are the best means of anchoring it to the wall to have the best support. Any ideas?
Thanks!
Jean-Franηois
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Mannanan asks:

You need to screw it into the studs, not the wall. Locate the studs before mounting the cabinet, pick the spots for your screws, and drive them neatly into the studs.
If you like, place a decorative brace just under the cabinet, screwed into the same studs.
Studs will support a devil of a lot more weight than will expansion fasteners in drywall or plaster.
Depending on load, I'd use 2 or 3 screws per stud (on 24" centers, you'll hit 3, on 16" centers, you might hit 4). #10 or #12, 3" length. Do NOT use drywall screws.
Charlie Self "I hope our wisdom will grow with our power, and teach us, that the less we use our power the greater it will be." Thomas Jefferson
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Charlie Self wrote:

Why is that?
-- Mark
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Mark Jerde asks:

They're brittle, so their shear strength is poor.
Charlie Self "I hope our wisdom will grow with our power, and teach us, that the less we use our power the greater it will be." Thomas Jefferson
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we use

I think it's also the case that they have a relatively narrow shank, which obviously doesn't improve their strength.
todd
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I have used deck screws for things like that. Are they brittle also? I figure they are pretty much the same as drywall screws except for length. A few have broken going in, but I have never had a problem afterwards.
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    Greetings and Salutations.
On Sun, 16 Nov 2003 05:11:19 GMT, "Wade Lippman"

    Nope...Deck Screws are NOT hardened to the extent that drywall screws are...so they are a lot "tougher" - resistant to breaking when drilling in.     As for hanging the cabinet...I would recommend (as others have) the French cleat method. Although it does space the cabinet out half an inch or so, it is going to be THE strongest and most flexible way to hang them. I have been using the technique some years now, and was interested to note that one of the woodworking magazines has JUST published a lengthy and very positive article about the technique.     Shoot one or two screws though the wall cleat into the studs (making sure to get an inch into the stud itself) and you just about will be able to hang an elephant on the cleat before it fails.     Regards     Dave Mundt
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When I first "discovered" the french cleat method for hanging cabinets, when redoing my kitchen ages ago, I thought it was the greatest idea since <insert witty invention here>.
BUT, beware of unsquare/unplumb corners in (old) houses.
Built a lovely corner unit that musta weighed 40# (maybe more, not less) Now, I know 40# to you brutes is barely equivalent to a feather for me. But for l'il ole me it gets kinda heavy, especially when one has to repeatedly lift the ^#@%#*^%# cabinet a hundert times because the &$*^%#* walls aren't *&%&$*& straight!
But, I get ahead of myself...
So, I fasten a cleat to each wall. Lift the cabinet...resort to sliding it up the wall, and hang it on the cleats. The walls are soo bad that it won't grab both cleats. Long story short - mess around with various adjustments, including a cleat on one wall, but in the end, mount the cabinet the old fashioned way, directly into the walls using lags (I don't have studs, didn't trust the furring strips, so I lagged into the concrete block (brick and block walls) - The lagging was yet more excitement, entailing rather long screws (have to accomodate the furring strips and drywall), but I don't recall nor will I bore you with the details.
Those corner cabinets aren't moving. If I found myself a 350# football linebacker for a boyfriend, I can rest assured he could do his chin ups off those cabinets ;-)
Renata
On Sun, 16 Nov 2003 09:40:31 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@esper.com (Dave Mundt) wrote:

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Wade Lippman asks:

Deck screws should be less brittle, but a lot depends on the particular deck screw. Given a choice, which we usually are, I'd kick back on-line and pop over to www.mcfeelys.com for answers on screws. Jim has several types of deck screw,d epending on material used, and he has a potful of driver type screws up to something like 3-7/8". He also has a #10 deep thread that he recommends for hanging cabinets. It comes in four different finishes, has a round washer head, is a #10 and comes in 5/8" to 3" lengths.
Charlie Self "I hope our wisdom will grow with our power, and teach us, that the less we use our power the greater it will be." Thomas Jefferson
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On 16 Nov 2003 02:03:15 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@aol.comnotforme (Charlie Self) brought forth from the murky depths:

Yeah, if you accidentally drop 4 bowling balls on one shelf of your glassware hutch at once it might cause the whole thing to fall. ;)
I've had failures in drywall screws, but it was from a racking/bending force, not shear force. Have you had a failure from shear?
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Larry Jaques questions:

I've had heads twist off with very low force--hand driven, in fact. So there's no chance at all I'll ever have a shear failure in a real project with one. I simply do not use them except to install wallboard.
Charlie Self "I hope our wisdom will grow with our power, and teach us, that the less we use our power the greater it will be." Thomas Jefferson
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Charlie Self wrote:

In my home office I have 3 sets of 3 eight foot bookshelves attached to the wall studs with 2" drywall screws. The shelves are chocked full of mainly computer programming books, dunno, maybe 1000 lbs on each set of the 3 shelves. They've been up for several years. Any reason I should be worried? (I don't recall for sure, but I probably drilled a hole for most of the length before putting in the screws.)
-- Mark
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the
I wouldn't be that concerned at this point. My beef with drywall screws (like Charlie, it sounds), is that they seem to twist off the head during installation rather easily.
todd
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Mark Jerde asks:

Half a ton? Books are heavy, but that's still a lot of books. If the screws haven't sheared off by now, I'd forget it. I think. Then again, I might run in some other type of steel screws just to be safe.
Hope you're not in earthquake country.
Charlie Self "I hope our wisdom will grow with our power, and teach us, that the less we use our power the greater it will be." Thomas Jefferson
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On 16 Nov 2003 14:24:34 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@aol.comnotforme (Charlie Self) wrote:

Earthquake would be my biggest worry. The additional jarring might easily start a chain reaction of breaking screws. I've used drywall screws to hold cabinet parts together then later torn them apart. You can easily tell the difference in strength between the drywall screws and "regular" screws. Even the cheap deck screws from the Borg have much better shear strength than good drywall screws.
Oh, half a ton of books isn't much. Get out a scale and start figuring. A set of encyclopedias can easily run 150-200 lbs.
Tim Douglass
http://www.DouglassClan.com
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Hell yeah! You've should be worried about the bux you've blown on books that are out-of-date already? Any of them "Programming Apple ][ Pascal"? Or "PDP-11 Assembly Language"? :)
Pssst - have you got any room to store my two VIC-20 books???
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mttt wrote:

On the other side of the room is my "Hall of Fame" bookshelf. When a generation of books becomes useless I get rid of most, keeping a few that give me warm-fuzzies: "The C Programming Language" by K & R (Pre ANSI version) "Inside the IBM PC" by Norton, 2nd Ed. (Has a now funny description of the massive amounts of space in the 1MB address space) A couple 8086 assembly language books. (I did some really low level stuff in MSDOS 1.0) Two SNOBOL books. (How I miss that pattern-matching language!) Petzold's "Programming Windows 3.1" Just two texts from college.
I wish I'd have kept the PDP-11 assembly language book. ;-) I used to be semi-decent at addition and subtraction in octal.
-- Mark
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Charlie Self wrote:

Wish I had remembered how hard they are. I used some to screw a jig together. The points were sticking out a trifle at the bottom, so I whipped out my handy dandy X-Acto razor saw.
Such a pity. I used that stupid thing all the time for cutting everything, but now it's ruined unless I find some reallllly tiny needle files to put new points on it.
--
Michael McIntyre ---- Silvan < snipped-for-privacy@users.sourceforge.net>
Linux fanatic, and certified Geek; registered Linux user #243621
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Silvan wrote:

Whack the protruding ends with a hammer and they snap right off. I learned that from a guy that built stage sets for acting groups. Works like a champ.
As Billy Gates would say regarding their brittleness, "It's not a bug, it's a feature."
Dick
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wrote:

Overtightening a drywall screw, which is common with power-driven screws into wood/wood interfaces, will twist the head right off.
Barry
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