how much motor for a joiner

I've got a small joiner i purchased for next to nothing at a sale. I'll have to take a closer look, i don't know the brand or the diameter of the cutter unit. It's about 4" wide i believe. I'm trying to figure out how much motor i need, what rpm, and what belt ratio to use. I'll probably never use it for more than red oak a max of 1" thick. Any ideas with this limited input?
thanks.
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Steve Barker
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On 3/3/2012 11:07 PM, Steve Barker wrote:

ok, i guess the word is JOINTER when in this particular application.
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We knew what you meant. If your jointer allows you to take 0.125" off a 4" wide piece of oak, you'll want 3/4 HP. 2 Pole (3600RPM) or 4 pole (1800 RPM) doesn't matter, just change the pulley ratio. Ball bearing motors are nicer than bushings but they're more money. US or Canada made motors are usually better quality than off-shore ones. Again, more money. You DO want an enclosed fan. Baldor makes nice motors.
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On 3/4/2012 1:07 AM, Robatoy wrote:

My Dad had a jointer. It's probably still in his garage, under a few things. He'd run more or less all his edges through it after sawing them, taking off a very thin layer in a pass. We also used one in shop class, again for edges. All of this was when the world was young, of course, and my experience was limited even then. But the bit above confuses me.
My question is this: Is an eighth-inch really a common (or safe) amount to take off in one pass through a jointer? Especially across the face of a 4" board? And why would you do this? How rough would the wood need to be to require the removal of that much material? Or would thinning the wood out be the goal?
The usual caveats apply , which can be summed up under the general heading of "my woodworking ignorance".
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On 3/5/2012 9:10 AM, Greg Guarino wrote:

ignoring the 1/8" part, running the face of the board across the jointer is the first step to be performed before using a surface planer.
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On 3/5/2012 9:10 AM, Greg Guarino wrote:

I would not take 1/8" of with one pass but if your jointer will do it it will have plenty of power.
Additionally the only surfaces you truly want to run through the jointer are one edge and one face. If you run both edges and both faces you are wasting material if you expect to end up with parallel surfaces and edges.
When preparing the surfaces of wood the jointer is only intended to create flat "reference" sides and edges. Use those reference surfaces to correctly create opposite parallel surfaces with a thickness planer and a table saw.
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I have a similar jointer, and haven't yet gotten around to running it. A 1/3-1/2 HP motor was suggested in this thread: http://newsgroups.derkeiler.com/Archive/Rec/rec.woodworking/2010-06/msg02 031.html
(That is a web-based mirror of the wRECk.)
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Steve Barker wrote:

WHEN you go motor shopping, always check here first.
http://www.surpluscenter.com /
Unless you have money to burn, that is. :-)
Deb
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On Sat, 03 Mar 2012 23:07:49 -0600, Steve Barker

Are you saying the motor on it needs to be replaced or there's no motor on it at all? If there is a motor, you can probably get it rebuilt. If no motor initially, then I'd suggest having a look at some comparable new models of jointer and buying a similar or slightly heavier duty motor that's on the new ones.
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My wife picked up a 50's era 4" jointer years ago at a garage sale (Yes - I am a LUCKY MAN!). It was mounted on a home made wooden stand with a 3/4 horse electric mother of unknown origin. The motor was fine for that machine because the bed was too narrow to put much strain on it even when surface planing. That little jointer was a good example of the tools that Sears/Craftsman provided in the early years. Solid, well made and heavy.
BTW - I think jointer and Joiner are both OK and used interchangeably in some WW magazines.
RonB
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On 3/4/2012 9:34 AM, RonB wrote:

I've not EVER heard the machine called a joiner. It is a jointer. I have heard of a bisquit joiner, not the same machine - very different application.
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On 3/4/2012 5:26 PM, DanG wrote:

Stick around a while, and you will have heard joiner and jointer used interchangeably. While as you pointed out jointer and joiner are two different things, then and than are very often used in place of each other and most are not thrown off track by the miss use of those two words.
Now if you really want to get picky, keep an eye on my posts, where every fifth word is misspelled, and try to figure out what I am saying. ;~)
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*snip*

And if you take a fifth of all the letters required to correct the spelling errors, and jumble them around 5 times and take a fifth of the words they spell, you'll get a cryptic message that not even Leon understands. :-)
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On 3/5/2012 6:56 AM, Puckdropper wrote:

Actually, Smarty Pants, I often can't understand what I just said, never the extra effort. LOL.
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On 3/5/2012 7:52 AM, Leon wrote:

FESTOOL ... FESTOOL 8>)
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Yeah, I know. A joiner is a machine used to cut slots or holes for biscuits or similar "JOINING" devices. However, I have heard and seen the word joiner and jointer used interchangeably for about 35 years and it never bothered me as much is it seem to bother you. The primary purpose of the machine is to prepare edges of lumber for joining.
RonB
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All right, all right, all right, etc.
RonB :O)
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