How much HP is too much for a 14" Bandsaw?

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On Fri, 24 Dec 2004 11:57:37 -0600, Duane Bozarth

if your saw is *that* underbuilt just throw it away and buy a real saw....
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Larry Jaques wrote:
<snipped>

The upper and lower wheels move in sync because of the blade tension.. Because the wheels move in sync any stretching of the blade will cause the slack to be on the gap side. The stress on C-frame is also caused by the wheels moving in sync.
-- Jack Novak Buffalo, NY - USA (Remove "SPAM" from email address to reply)
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calmly ranted:

Oh, so it's the stretching that causes the stress? <giggle> You lost me with your last sentence. What part of synchronization (other than the tension which puts them there) causes stress?
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Larry Jaques wrote:

The blade stretch takes place from the point of the bind to the drive wheel. Because the wheels attempt to move in sync the added length (along with the slop caused ny the slight compression of the tires and frame flex) is transferred around both wheels to the the top of the piece being cut. Although the blade isn't fixed to the frame other than being restricted by the piece being cut, think of the wheels as acting as the cams in a compound bow.
-- Jack Novak Buffalo, NY - USA (Remove "SPAM" from email address to reply)
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calmly ranted:

Close, but way different. The bow flexes when the bowstring is pulled while the spring expands/releases when the blade is stretched. We're talking opposites of your theory here. The equivalent on the bow is the string, which remains at a fairly stable tension at or near the rest position. Pull the string back 2" and you have the equivalent of the bandsaw blade when the saw is turned off. Release the string and you have the equivalent of the blade during a resaw, slightly less tension and no bow flex.
The tension spring in the bandsaw takes up most of the slack and removes the necessity to flex from the frame. Unless the spring is bottomed out (full tension) or released (not involved), the frame isn't stressed much more or less by stretch.
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wrote:

but given that it's the same blade running at the same speed on the same wheels, there is *no* difference.
now if you use that bigger motor as an excuse to jamb bigger pieces of wood faster through a duller blade, yes you will be loading up the frame. it'd be like putting a big block on a gocart. no problem at idle, but floor it and the motor will tear itself free.
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On Fri, 24 Dec 2004 14:26:16 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@all.costs calmly ranted:

Yes, but only that portion of the frame which supports the driven wheel bearing.
P.S: Jambs are for doors, not jammin' wood.
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