How much horsepower is really needed?

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Jack, I faced the same choice and ended up with a Jet 3hp cabinet. I had been using an ancient craftsman contractor saw. I loved that saw, even if it did bog down cutting 1"pine if the stars weren't in line. It cost me a little more in the long run but I have no fear of Hardwoods, Dados, Bevels or astrology. To get into a solid 2hp saw your'r close to some of 3hp cabinets. Having used both 11/2 and 2hp, I would recommend the 2 hp and would not consider a 11/2 unless I had no choice. My needs do include lots of hardwood and your needs now may change over time to include hardwoods and 2hp would allow room to grow. Besides HP you do need to consider other qualities; Fence,Wings, Table, Arbor. All the HP in the world won't get rid of the headache of a bad fence or warped table followed up with no support from the manufacture. My vote would be for a 2hp contractor/ although they are 115/230 you could get on by on 115 until you could wire 230. But I point out again that the price would put you close to a grizzly cabinet. Many like the grizzlys. As pointed out by others a good quality thin blade can help. Half the fun is shopping. YMMV ED
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http://www.grizzly.com/products/item.aspx?itemnumber=G0576
That oughta do it!
--
Alex - "newbie_neander" woodworker
cravdraa_at-yahoo_dot-com
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143 7/8 horsepower. If you go as low as 143 3/4, you will not be able to produce any serious work whatsoever. Seriously, I have a 1 horse saw. I have ripped 2 inch thick liptus using a combo blade. Had to be careful about feed rate but didn't have any problem with it. More power would be nice but this works.
"mywebaccts (at) PLUGcomcast.net" <"mywebaccts (at) PLUGcomcast.net"> wrote in message

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That's sounds alright and workin, but how does one find_out the exact horse power of a motor?
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Alex - "newbie_neander" woodworker
cravdraa_at-yahoo_dot-com
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Contrary to popular belief, small motors are not rated by output horsepower. They are rated by input horsepower, how much power they consume. This, of course, allows variation of actual output according to motor efficiency but, for reasonable quality motors of the same type, there is not a lot of efficiency difference. Volts * amps / 746

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Alright, volts (#) times amps (#) divided by 746 equals actual horsepower?
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Alex - "newbie_neander" woodworker
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No to both. Power consumption is one way of rating. So many watts. Doesn't tell how well they are converted to energy.
Power output another. Some go with "developed" HP, which is pretty optimistic.
What's on the nameplate is generally pretty good.
This a good thing to read. http://www.iprocessmart.com/leeson/leeson_electrical_reference.htm
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Yes, (before anybody jumps in to say it, yes, 1 horsepower is actually equal to 745.6998 watts. Also, power factor has little use in this context).

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you don't.
there are so many ways to calculate horsepower that the term is almost meaningless. a much more useful number for small power tools is watts.
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Somebody wrote:

You set up a pony brake to measure foot lbs of absorbed power per unit of time as well as the necessary electrical instrumentation to measure input volts, amps and power factor.
You now crunch the data with your handy dandy slide rule, then plot electrical data vs mechanical data.
I won't tell you how long ago we did this as a mechanical enginering lab project, but the slide rule comment should give you a clue.
Lew
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Well, since they are selling on e-bay as "Old, Rare, Vintage, Antique Slide Rule - L@@K!", you must be an Antique. Wait a minute, I started with a slide rule. Guess that makes me an Antique too!
Unfortunately there are a zillion of them out there. Slide Rules, that is.
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you must be an Antique. Wait a minute, I started

I still have a couple of the less common circular types. Also an old celestial computer, though the epoch is a few back. Wonder if there's a market on e-b for them?
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George wrote:

They still sell circular slide rules every day!
<http://www.sportys.com/acb/showdetl.cfm?DID &CATID1&Product_ID97&count=1&Pcount=2&DETAIL=1>
Barry
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<http://www.sportys.com/acb/showdetl.cfm?DID &CATID1&Product_ID97&count=1&Pcount=2&DETAIL=1>
Ayup, my old Jeppeson CR-3 lived in the lower left leg pocket of my flight suit for years. It's only incidentally a slide rule, however. I liked it because it had both polar and rectangular drift methods on the wind face. http://aviationaccessories.net/pro36406.html
The aluminum E6B type Sam gave me was unnecessarily bulky, and you had to slip and slide....
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Last time I looked there were something like 500 for sale. Take a look at the closed auctions. A very select few bring in fairly good money.
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I have a vintage Unisaw with a 1HP Repulsion-Induction motor (the bullet). My blade is a Forrest WWII and I recently had to do some cuts on a bunch of 4 X 4 PT pieces which included ripping them to an exact 3" width. Nary a hiccup, although they are not oak. Still, there's horsepower, and then there's horse-power.
If you're buying a (new) cabinet saw, 3HP should be the minimum. If it's a contractor saw with a single (normal) belt, I think 1 HP would work out OK for most homeowner stuff, but if you're thinking hybrid (like a Craftsman zip code saw)... I'd imagine the wider, serpentine belt would help on anything really tough.
For the money you'd spend on a "better" contractor-style saw, you can often find a quality used cabinet saw. But you have to have some patience to wait out the best buys. Even if a minor rebuild is necessary, you'll wind up with a saw that looks and cuts like a $2000 new saw and it'd be hard to spend $900 on a decent used cabinet saw.
On Fri, 18 Nov 2005 22:47:26 -0700, "mywebaccts (at) PLUGcomcast.net" <"mywebaccts (at) PLUGcomcast.net"> wrote:

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