How many hammers do you think one needs?

Page 1 of 3  
How many hammers do you think one needs, and does it matter a lot where you get them (Sears comes to mind as the standard source)?
If some hammer sources are inferior (HF?), then why (not properly heat-treated?)?
Thanks, Bill
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Hmm... I have (counts) nine hammers, if you could the wooden mallet I made. Three regular hammers, various weights, various claw shapes. Three dead-blow, various sizes. Two sledge (3lb and 8lb). One wooden mallet. Wait... ten, there's a stainless steel one in the kitchen. I think I have a half-weight regular one too, eleven. My kids have a few of their own too.
The only ones I have issue with are the wooden handled ones, only because they seem to either break or come loose over time. Repairable, but annoying.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Consider yourself lucky you don't have some the new Stiletto Titanium hammers (or maybe you do). At some of them running $300 a pop, you'd be in the poor house a long time ago.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Counting hammers is tough!
I have 8 ball peen hammers, three sledges 8, 5, 3. Engineer's hammer 9# Long head tack, tap, framing, regular, regular with tuning fork (works!), black dead-blow, Brass, wood, plastic, ......
I have been collecting hammers since 1950. I had a tool box by then and still have it. It is made of thick STEEL.
The long head and my old framer are over 50 years old. My engineers is about 8 years old and the three are likely like none in most boxes.
Martin
DJ Delorie wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

engineers hammer, 3# hand sledge, urethane mallet, two ball pein hammers of different sizes, and at least one tack hammer. Ummm.... nine. And I'm not sure that's enough.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Doug Miller wrote:

I popbably have in the area of 15 to 20 different hammers, In addition to those mentioned.
A couple of framing hammers, a couple of different mason's hammers, a drywall hammer, a shingling (i.e shake shingle) hammer...
I've even got one of the "Bell System" lineman's hammers (1770 in this weeks "Was is it" quiz).
--
Jack Novak
Buffalo, NY - USA
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

The handle (shock absorption and grip) is important, as is the angle of the head to the handle, and the face to the handle. A hammer that has the face parallel to the handle will bend a lot of nails. IIRC the angle on a decent hammer is something on the order of 3 degrees (head toward the handle).
Tempering, as you pointed out, is another aspect. *NEVER* hit a cut, or other concrete nail, with a hammer intended for common nails. A friend almost lost an eye with that trick. After something like fifteen eye surgeries in fifteen days the surgeon was able to save it.
Personal preference has a lot to do with it too. Some like steel shanks, others wood or fiberglass. Some don't like anything from HF.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

A better lesson to take out of that experience is to never use a hammer without eye protection.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sun, 08 Nov 2009 01:42:56 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@milmac.com (Doug Miller) wrote:

That too, but steel on steel is a bad combination. BTW, it wasn't the nail that got him. It was the hammer.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
krw wrote:

Do they make a hammer that won't smash your finger? :-) I know, it's called an "air nailer"
One of those big serrated finger-smashing jobbies lies somewhere at the bottom of the Lake Of The Ozarks in Missouri. My dad threw it out there about 35 years ago right after he smashed his finger at the end of a LONG day of framing. I think many Budweisers were subsequently consumed. :-)
--
"Our beer goes through thousands of quality Czechs every day."
(From a Shiner Bock billboard I saw in Austin some years ago)
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sun, 08 Nov 2009 08:49:20 -0600, Steve Turner

Certainly, it's designed to get the thumb.

A worker on an friend's job site shot a nail clear through the middle of his foot. They had to cut the decking around his foot and carry him, nail, and the piece of decking off the roof and to the emergency room. Smashed fingers aren't all that bad.

Anesthesia is certainly called for.
"Our beer goes through thousands of quality Czechs every day."
A bar on campus had a sign "No Czechs".
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I got at least ten or twelve, including a baby claw hammers for hanging things on the wall. I got a coupon from ace hardware and ended up paying about 16 cents for it. Very good for its intended purpose.
I got a baby sledge, for "persausion" work. A couple "soft" hammers for work that can not be marred or dented. A ball peen hammer. I have fiberrglass, steel and wood handled hammers. I use what I think is appropriate or comfortable for a particular job.
My favorite? It is a wooden handled hammer that has an ergonomic curve to it.When I hit a nail, the finished position is with my hand straight. It is easier on my wrist.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Depends on what you use them for.
Two rawhide hammers for my leatherwork. One chipped wooden hammer made in a Grade 5 woodshop and saved because of nostalgia. One rubber headed mallet. One dead blow hammer. Two steel headed, wooden handle claw hammers. One ball peen hammer. One tack hammer. A plastic headed hammer. One small hand sledge hammer. (which I intend to use for my UTube premier of me smashing up a $350 computer motherboard)
Those eleven are what I can remember, but they're all important additions to the history of my tool acquisitions. The best I can say about them is they're a graphic representation of my do it yourself attitude. :)
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sat, 07 Nov 2009 20:09:43 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@teksavvy.com wrote:

Interesting, I forgot to mention my deadblow hammer. Ever since I was given a rawhide hammer, at times I find myself using the rawhide instead of the deadblow--it won't mar the wood and not as clumsy/heavy as the deadblow. I think I forgot to mention my seldom used sledge hammer, but when you need one there's no good substitute. My hammer count just went up to about 14.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
One more.
--

-MIKE-

"Playing is not something I do at night, it's my function in life"
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Bill wrote:

Well, HF 16 oz, hammers are only $2.79 (Black Friday sale with coupon). I'll wager they have exactly the same manufacturing processes as other hammers. I've never heard of one shattering or bending.
The only thing you need to do is scuff the head by dragging it across the concrete.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
HeyBub wrote:

No, they're far too soft generally to shatter but there's certainly no way the manufacturing process is even close to "exactly the same" as that of, say, Estwing

That's actually about the worst treatment you could give a framing hammer... :(
--
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

One claw that I bought in the '70's to build a workshop. Another I inherited from my dad. Both Craftsman. Those are the ones that get most use when not using air nailers. I have a few plastic soft hammers, etc. Cannot imagine spending a fortune on exotic metals and design.
Its a hammer dammit.
RonB
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

One claw that I bought in the '70's to build a workshop. Another I inherited from my dad. Both Craftsman.
I inherited my grandfather's toolbox in 1975. Ten years later, somebody broke in to my hatchback (Omni) after audio speakers, and took the toolbox...but I had brought the hammer into my apartment to hang a picture just before that. So that 20-22 oz hammer is the "rest of the story" (at least for the time being). It has served my apartmental hammering needs since then.
Tage Frid suggested collecting a 12 oz. hammer, and they were actually out of that particular size on my last trip to Sears. My question was really motiated by my curiosity as to whether these sorts of Craftsman hand tools still offer the best bang for the buck. I know that their power tools are not well-regarded here.
Back around '72, my dad sold me on Craftsman tools, and my grand-dad sold me on Buick (autos)-- he worked for Chevrolet. As if you didn't already know, I would be too saddened to update you on the progress of both of those brands since that time...
Bill
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I think that their Mechanic's tools (including hammers) are still well-regarded, especially in the realm of hobiest/home mechanics. It's their power tools (table saws, routers, router accesories, &tc.) that are suspect. But don't trust other's opinions over your own gut feelings. I buy sockets, wrenches, pliers, scewdrivers, &tc. from Sears all the time, and will continue to do so.
Also, I recall that they may sell different brands, i.e. "Sear's" vs. "Craftsman".
-Zz
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.