How make dowel rod?

Without a lathe, how can I make 1" dowel rod from Oak? Is it as simple as taking a 1" square oak blank and running each side through a router table with 1/2 radius round over bit against the bit bearing and a fence?
Seems like that last side would be a problem to keep aligned.
Im doing this becuase I need dowels longer then 4' which is the longest I can find to buy.
Anyone done this? thanks
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Here's a couple of ideas.
A dowel plate. A piece of steel with a 1 inch hole is one way. See the Lie-Nielsen dowel plate as an example.
http://www.highlandwoodworking.com/index.asp?PageAction=VIEWPROD&ProdIDD85
I saw an episode of the woodright shop in which Roy Underhill used a dowel plate to make dowels for a wooden rake. It is simplicity in action, however like all non-electric woodworking it isn't necessarily easy work.
The Lie-Nielsen website includes a PDF from David Charlesworth explaining dowel plates and another method using a section of pipe.
Either of those hand tools would be more to my liking than trying to use a router table and roundover bit.
--
Lloyd Baker

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What you suggest will work. Just leave the last 1" on each end square and cut it off when you're done routing.
I haven't tried the following but I think it will work. If your rod is going to be too long for the ends to stay in contact with the fence, leave 1 or more square sections in the middle of the rod as you round the corners. Then starting at one end successively round over the middle square sections.
Art

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After reading my own post I realized an easier way for long dowels.
Measure the length of your infeed fence. Call this X. Round all 4 corners of the first X-1 inches on the blank. Round the next X-1 inches. Repeat until you get to the last section and leave the final 1 inch square.
Art

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Now is a good chance to buy another tool! How about the Veritas dowel maker?
http://www.leevalley.com/wood/page.aspx?c=2&pB331&cat=1,180,42288
Bob
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Here's another option that may be cheaper: http://www.highlandwoodworking.com/index.asp?PageAction=Custom&IDS Andy
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I have done this and made a 1/2" diameter dowel.
Take a piece of square stock that is 1"x1" plus add the width of your saw blade to the top and side dimension. Quarter the piece and then round over 1 corner of each remaining 1/2" x1/2" piece. Glue and put the 4 pieces together to forma your dowel. Rounding over 1 corner is much easier than all 4 and quartering before rounding over is easier with square corners.
I happened upon this by accident when making 1/4 rounds and decided to glue the extra leftover pieces together. Use masking tape and wrap it around the 4 pieces to hold them together while the glue dries.
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Dowel making on a lathe is not as easy as it sounds, unless you have some sort of jig that holds a router or other tool. Making one with a round-over router bit works. You can make a hexagon, then sand it round. Easiest way is to purchase a dowel rod.
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Google "stail engine." Not too hard to make your own. Japan Woodworker used to sell them for about $8.00, IIRC.
Commercial dowels are invariably out-of-round, except for the bagged cutoffs with the glue channels. Milling process using two passes over a bullnose shaper cutter is to blame. Rotary cut dowels from 30 years ago were almost always dead-on- perfect.
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wrote:

You can do with a quarter-round or bullnose bit, of course. Use the jointer principle and support it on the far side of the bit with a shaped "fence" is the best, leaving periodic square sections to be removed later, ensuring that two contact a fence at all times will work too. The U (ok it's not a _deep_ U) method does the hold down for you. featherboard the in hold.
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Oak quarter round is available at most trim mills, four pieces glued together will get you close.
Or, as Leon suggests, make your own oak quarter round and proceed.
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Make a pointy stick a little longer than the length dowel you desire
Cut off pointy end.
See link for further info on pointy sticks or just ping Charlie B
http://groups.google.ca/group/rec.woodworking/browse_frm/thread/c7c283004de463b6/3211478ca6d769a4?hl=en&lr=&rnum=1&prev=/groups%3Fq%3Dg:thl1624142608d%26dq%3D%26hl%3Den%26lr%3D%26selm%3D4221F2CF.DFA%2540accesscom.com#3211478ca6d769a4
well someone had to say it....
jc
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thank you!. Those are great tips. Ill take a shot at using the round over bit on the table router making sure to do only sections short enough to keep a flat against the fence. But I really like the home made jig too. That would be a fun jig to make.
thanks again for the superb help

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Unless you want a lot of them then doing it by hand is easy - mark up a circle at each end of the blank and then just join the lines with a jack or a block plane - or rough out with an axe, draw knife etc to start with. To plane, hold in a vice or a simple cradle jig of some sort. I'd ignore the Lie-Nielsen website explaining dowel plates as it's all wrong. Dowel plate is very useful for short dowels such as you'd put through the corner of a frame mortice & tenon, but it has to be firmly mounted in the top of a bench as you have to hit very hard.
cheers Jacob
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