How long to acclimate air dried lumber?

Last weekend I bought some rough 4/4 air dried red and white oak. First time buying air dried and delighted with the price - $1/ft. The fellow that sold it (old guy with a wood mizer) said he guessed it was about 15% moisture content - been drying in his barn a couple years. Anyway, to get it acclimated to house conditions before I use it I stickered it in my basement by the furnace where it's about 50% rel humidity, 68 degrees. How long do you think I should wait? Don't have a moisture meter, however a 15lb board (per the bathroom scale) dropped a pound in four days. I live in NW Indiana, if that matters.
Thanks, Steve
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Personally, I'd jump on one of those 30 buck moisture meters that several catalogs have for sale...McFeely's and Lee Valley come to mind.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Hi Steve, If it was indeed air dried for a couple of years and is 4/4 it should be as dry as it is going to get from air drying. I have some in same situation and it is 8 - 10%. After being stickered in my heated non humidified shop for a week or two at this time of year, it drops a per cent or two. I agree with Charlie, spend the money for a moisture meter. If it's dropped almost 7% in a week I would doubt it was 15% to start with. Cheers, JG
Steve wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Book answer is one per cent per week, which would bring a prospective 15% to the 10 in the house in five weeks. Real answer is to crosscut one of those boards., whack out a 1x2x2 chunk, weigh, and then microwave lightly until it loses weight no more, then compute. That said, I'd have no problems working it in three, since you're going to be 12 % or more summer average in Indiana anyway.
One of the 30 dollar moisture meters? Not sure how meaningful that is when there's no other choice available. Sort of like the micrometers folks use to see how far out of adjustment something is - interesting to know, but doesn't get it to right.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

How did you weigh the board? Bathroom scales or a laboratory scale?
If you used a bath scale the accuracy of the scale is poo and your results are not valid.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
In terms of percentage, well you're better off with a meter. Otherwise, weigh a piece and once it stabilizes in weight, you should be pretty close. How long to stabilize, you got me! As for "acclimating" once you think it's pretty dry, cut your stock to rough dimensions and let it sit for a week or so in your shop. Then cut to your final dimensions. I hate it when I cut/plane/etc...something and a week later it's warped etc... Cheers, cc

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Site Timeline

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.