How long does a bandsaw blade last?

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snipped-for-privacy@splinters.comcast.net wrote:

Pretty much anything green (i.e. wet), but particularly woods with high acid content such as cherry or oak.
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Regards,
Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
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wrote:

It's the kind you _don't_ see. The fine edges that make the blade sharp are the ones being pitted and eroded. If it gets so bad you see it on the sides of the blade, you're sadly neglecting your cleaning. You can control some of the corrosion by cleaning the teeth with WD40 between uses. Even if you don't get all the acid-concealing cake off the teeth and gullets, you get a bit of benefit in the WD -water displacement - category. Plus a smidgen of lube for the next time you fire up.
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On Thu, 04 May 2006 10:58:07 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@milmac.com (Doug Miller) wrote:

Not much worry about those on the left coast... we're pretty much hardwood challenged here.. *g*
Mac
https://home.comcast.net/~mac.davis https://home.comcast.net/~mac.davis/wood_stuff.htm
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Toller,
You should be able to find washing soda at any decent size grocery store. Probably won't find it at Walmart, but your local Kroger et.al. should have it. It also doubles as an electrolyte if you want to remove rust by electrolysis.
Regards, Roy

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Doug Miller wrote:

I agree with Doug on cleaning the blade.
If you're cutting "green" walnut, after cleaning the blade, try spraying the it with "Pam" (or other brand substitute) cooking spray. It helps in keeping the build-up off the blade.
--
Jack Novak
Buffalo, NY - USA
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Symptom, not cause. Ceramics.

One of the worst ways to get drift is to saw close to the actual grain direction, but not quite. Least resistance.

Might cause sticking or slipping, but hardly drift.

WD40 here. On a cloth, power off, rotating blade in reverse. Walnut is corrosive, like cherry and oaks, so you want to clean up after each session and the lube it retains doesn't hurt in sliding through the wood. That corrosion is a likely cause of blade dulling, along with cutting bark, which is usually loaded with grit. Commercial operations debark for that reason.
If you've neglected the blade to the point where cloth and solvent won't work, you can try the brass BBQ brush for caked. Soaking in TSP, washing soda or any of the other "green" surfactants will probably work, too, but it involves a lot of extra time and effort.
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Perhaps you hit a foreign object (nail, stone, etc) embedded in the wood. Have you checked the teeth to make sure they're equally sharp on both sides?
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Regards,
Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
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I buy pretty good quality blades, made up at a local saw shop.. If I'm cutting dry wood for pen blanks or kiln dried and FLAT wood for bowl blanks, they seem to last forever...
OTOH, cutting green wood usually beats them up pretty fast... my guess is because not only does the green wood drag more, which heats the blade, but you get more twists and binds because the surface resting on the table is not going to be real flat and square..
I think that if I cut 160 feet of 5" stock with the same blade, I'd feel pretty good about it... YMWV
Usually the first sign that my blade is not sharp anymore is wander... much like a drill bit that is clogged or dull will wander on a deep hole... I think that instead of cutting what you put in front of it, it tends to follow grain or stress patterns or something, what ever the "point of least resistance" is.. (just a WAG)
Mac
https://home.comcast.net/~mac.davis https://home.comcast.net/~mac.davis/wood_stuff.htm
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You can try tension, guides, etc. but I bet the blade is dull. Everybody raves about Timberwolf blades, but I am totally unimpressed. I switched to a Lenox bimetal blade (1/2", 4 tpi) and it lasts MUCH longer (10x?) . You can buy it from Iturra Designs or carbide.com.
Another consideration is that heat totally destroys the carbon steel blades. (As I understand it, "silicon steel" is essentially the same as carbon steel.) If you pushed too fast and got burning, etc. that can wipe out the blade instantly. Also, if the tracking was off and the blade ever came off and hit the guards, that can destroy it.
Mark
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120V or 240V? Is the switch adequately rated for the HP? <giggle>
Seriously, I'd guess that the blade got a bit hot. and maybe stretched a _little_. And not uniformly front-to-back.
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'Bout the same length of time as a lollipop.
And that is because a canary is yellow and the Eiffel Tower is also made out of steel. Which brings me to: What is the price of a car?
<Major yukkage>
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wrote:

Actually, it's made of iron, not steel.
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Darn... I've been messin' with peoples' heads all these years?
From now on...iron it is.
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originally was cast iron, but I think they've replaced most of it with structural steel by now....
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Toller wrote:

Make sure you're minimizing cutting through bark; better yet, remove the bark entirely. Watch out about tensioning with the TimberWolf blade, it is a low tension blade, read their instructions carefully.
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Hey, I can usually tell by just feeling the teeth and looking at the blade.
I think the belt could be dull especially if the wood was not that clean. Are you using a straight fence, doing free hand or using a resaw type curved fence. I found that when I used delta blades or even olson, 160' would have used at least one or maybe more blades.
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Toller,
It's possible that there is something amiss with your setup (blade tension, drift angle, technique, etc.) that was being masked by the sharp blade. But, once the newness of the edge wore off and the blade became only semi-sharp, these problems became apparent. Just a guess on my part here.
I just wanted to add that,according to Mark Duginske, while carbide-toothed blades are 10 times more expensive, they last 50 times longer. Most people think carbide bandsaw blades are more expensive, but they're actually much cheaper in the long run. For the price of a new timberwolf blade, I can get my carbide blade re-sharpened and then it lasts a long time...again.
I have a Laguna wood slicer (think that's what it's called) and it's fine. Lenox makes a good blade too if your interested. Both are in the $200 range though.
Good luck,
Mike
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