How is this piece made

Page 1 of 2  
There is a chaise http://www.dwr.com/productdetail.cfm?idH54 that I quite like the look of but I'm not sure how the twist is done. If you click on the View 6in Detail you'll see what I mean. The wood is flat around the edge and then twists 90degrees on the x axis and 90 degrees on the y axis to wrap around the top. It says 'carved from solid walnut' but wondering if this is accurate. I guess it could be a bandsawn from a solid chunk but seems more likely (to me) to be some form of compound lamination. Thoughts, and if the latter any pointers to where such a technique is described online.
damian
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

This piece is obviusly just an ordinary piece of 1 by 2 which is bent and twisted to the desired shape. DAGS "wood bending"
--
Dr. Juergen Hannappel http://lisa2.physik.uni-bonn.de/~hannappe
mailto: snipped-for-privacy@physik.uni-bonn.de Phone: +49 228 73 2447 FAX ... 7869
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I've only seen examples of woodbending where it bends in a curve, never where it twists like this (and I've googled) if you could point me at an example much appreciated.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

No, not bent or twisted. If you look at more of the detail pics you will see the grain is straight through, not around, the twist. A 5 axis CNC mill job.
-- Bill Pounds http://www.billpounds.com/woodshop
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I stand corrected. In the last of the detail pics it's indeed visible, but it also seems as if the twisted part goes only to the middle of the upward curve, just below the seam in the bolster there is a discontinuity in the grain that looks like a glue line.
If i find the time i have to try and twist-bend some wood.
--
Dr. Juergen Hannappel http://lisa2.physik.uni-bonn.de/~hannappe
mailto: snipped-for-privacy@physik.uni-bonn.de Phone: +49 228 73 2447 FAX ... 7869
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Overkill. A 3 axis would do fine.
> A 5 axis CNC mill

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I'm not sure that is the case. Look closely and you can see where the sides are joined together about halfway between head and foot. The grain definately changes direction, which it would not do on a bent wood technique.
The sides may very well be "Carved from solid walnut" -- you get $1000 plus for a chair, you can put some time into it.
Matthew
Phone: +49 228 73 2447 FAX ... 7869

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
looks to me like a CNC machining job especially with walnut

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
damian penney wrote:

As you say, the sides look like a 90 degree twist. However, the top appears to be a separate piece connected to each side (note seam near top of chaise).
Also, the exact phrase is "Carved down from solid walnut,..." so I don't think this precludes bent lamination of the sides.
~Mark.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
You're right, the top is a separate piece so I guess the piece just twists around one axis. I've only ever seen bentwood pieces where the bend is on the flat though, never twists hence the question. How easily does wood twist in a lamination? I know it can do some pretty tight bends but haven't seen any examples where it twists like this.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Look at the grain. It is carved (could be a cnc router), not bent.
You could steam bend/twist it, but the grain would twist with it.
damian penney wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Makes sense, and I can see the twisted piece is joined to the longer sides a little further down. Not familiar with CNC routing. Would this be difficult to carve? I've no experience with carving at all so not sure what's involved, is there an online resource I can look to?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
You get great points for persistence. CNC routing setups start at $6500. Carving a twist like that would take considerable practice, especially to get the thickness consistant around the whole twist. If your'e interested in carving, go for it! I havn't tried it, but I bet with the right form(s), a lot of clamps, bandsaw to resaw your board into layers, some polyurethane glue and some practice, you could do it without the glue lines really showing. Need to keep the boards in the same order they were sliced off. Tune up the bandsaw on scrap 'til you have your slabs consistent in thickness. Though the layers will be rough from even the best blade, the peaks and valleys will match from board to board, leaving a near seamless glue line without having to sand each piece (I have tried this part). You might want to do a search for David Marks, host of tv show "woodworks". He has done other bent laminations on his show and I wouldn't be surprised if he hadn't tried a twisted one. See if he has a contact link on his site. Good luck.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I did check out the David Marks site, and he does have a chair in his gallery that has a similar twist but there are no construction details.. An email came back with the stock 'we're too busy to answer emails' reply :)
I think I'll try the bandsaw/form technique and see how that works out. With regards the forms, do you think a solid form, or just attaching a clamp at both ends and twisting them would be the best way. Seems like by just securing the ends the wood could twist more naturally.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

You will never get any wood to twist like in the images, even from laminations
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Never say never :)
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
You could veneer it like that. Of course in this case it looks like it is carved the way they say it is.
-j

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I actually wouldn't mind if my reproduction had the grain curving and a CNC router is a little beyond my budget. Think I'll give it a whirl after my current project is completed and post the results.
Thanks for everyones input on this.
damian
J wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Wanna bet?
Check the 2x4 pile at any BORG!
Now, if they can do it with cheap lumber, a real woodworker should be able to manage an equivalent accomplishment in quality wood. <grin>
OR, you get lucky, and find some 'ready to use' parts in the 2x4 stack. Then it's just a matter of applying the right 'faux finish' to make it "look like walnut".
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Ammonia bending can easily achieve the 90 degree twist. max

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.