How do you 'tune' a hand plane?

Page 1 of 2  
In the discussion comparing handplanes, reference is made to the extra effort required to tune an older or pooer quality hand plane. I have to confess ignorance.... Is anyone up to a step by step description as to how it is done?
Dave
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Thu, 30 Dec 2004 02:12:18 GMT, "Dave"

I'm still a relative newbie to the world of hand planes, but the one thing I know for sure about the whole tuning situation is that it is a whole lot easier to have someone who knows how to do it help you get started. I must've worked on my old bailey plane for about 30 hours using various articles in magazines and website descriptions of the process, and got almost nowhere. Sure, it'd cut wood, but it wasn't pretty. I took the thing into a voc. ed course, and had the instructor give me a hand with it, and he had the thing shaving little curls of wood thin enough to read newsprint through in about 15 minutes. Most of the problems he spotted with my setup were not even mentioned in any of the articles I found, and I learned more in that 15 minutes than I did during countless hours of frustration. The moral of the story is not to mess with text descriptions of handplane tuning- IMO, it's much less time-consuming and more rewarding just to find someone who knows what the heck they're doing to at least take a look at your plane, and tell you how to fix it up!
Aut inveniam viam aut faciam
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Prometheus wrote:

Oh fooey. I've never had anything but. I don't think I know anyone under the age of 80 who has ever actually used a hand plane. (In three dimensions anyway. Sure, lotsa you electronic type invisible people on the other side of this piece of shiny glass.)
--
Michael McIntyre ---- Silvan < snipped-for-privacy@users.sourceforge.net>
Linux fanatic, and certified Geek; registered Linux user #243621
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Thu, 30 Dec 2004 09:26:41 -0500, Silvan

Nothing wrong with finding old folks- they're a wealth of information about all sorts of things. Your "80" figure is a bit high, though. They were still using hand planes in the local schools 20 years ago, so there are bound to be a few around who know what they're doing. Aut inveniam viam aut faciam
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Dave wrote:

http://www.ilovewood.com/alburnam17.htm
I'll leave the iron ones to the experts.
Glen
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

http://www.amgron.clara.net/ Will find one.
http://www.supertool.com/ Another to get you up on what the fanciers are talking about.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
George wrote:

http://www.yesterdaystools.com/tuninga1.htm Or if you'd rather have it done http://pages.sbcglobal.net/mike_in_katy/PlaneWood/Default.htm
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Fine Woodworking magazine has had wonderful articles on this subject. On their webpage there is an index of all issues. Most libraries have FW. Or, you can just order a new plane from Lie Neilsen. Dave
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Dave wrote:

First you thock it with your thumbnail. Note the pitch it produces. Now look up what pitch it's supposed to produce in the table. Remove metal or add weld until it produces the correct pitch when you thock it with your thumbnail. Now it's tuned perfectly.
(Now that you have some real answers already.)
--
Michael McIntyre ---- Silvan < snipped-for-privacy@users.sourceforge.net>
Linux fanatic, and certified Geek; registered Linux user #243621
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Not necessarily. This is a fine method if you're going to be planing alone, but if you're going to be planing with someone else, you'll want to grind or weld until you've got that pitch either 1/3 above or 1/3 below.
--

-Mike-
snipped-for-privacy@alltel.net
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Thu, 30 Dec 2004 19:02:28 -0500, "Mike Marlow"

Fifths sound much better than parallel thirds. Or, if you're into Godsmack, you could pick a nice dissonant pair. <G>
Barry
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

All right - you opened that box... what is that dissonant pair that those guys and others like them use?
--

-Mike-
snipped-for-privacy@alltel.net
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Fri, 31 Dec 2004 07:41:14 -0500, "Mike Marlow"

"Evil" stuff is usually played in minor keys, and sometimes with a flat fifth. Some hard rock bands tune a half or whole step lower, which gives the whole thing a gruntier sound. The "E" string on a guitar would actually be tuned to an "Eb" or "D", and the rest of the instrument is tuned to match.
In rock and roll, It could go back to the Black Sabbath's "Black Sabbath". Leaving rock, who knows who invented it? Scary, dissonant sounding passages appear in all kinds of classical music.
Barry
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

I'm going to try some flattened 5th stuff and see what it does. The sound you hear in a lot of the dissonant stuff today is definetely more than just drop tuning and it's something other than the standard 3rd or 5th for harmony.
--

-Mike-
snipped-for-privacy@alltel.net
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Fri, 31 Dec 2004 20:04:05 -0500, "Mike Marlow"

Also look into "passing tones".
Drop tuning dosen't create dissonance, but it can drastically change the way an amp and speaker handle the instrument. 5 string basses make a difference in the overall sound as well, if the rest of the band is using standard tuning.
Barry
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Yeah - I use passing tones in lead parts a lot, but I've never played with them to see if they would create that modern dissonant sound.
--

-Mike-
snipped-for-privacy@alltel.net
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Fri, 31 Dec 2004 13:44:16 GMT, Ba r r y

One of my favorites is the Germans marching into the Soviet Union in one of Shostakovich's symphonies (the Leningrad ?)
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

I haven't heard that.
Off to find it... <G>
Barry
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

My favorite is the four seasons, Vivaldi.
Alex
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

That's one I've heard.
Barry
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Site Timeline

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.