How do you transfer a pattern to your wood

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I am building a cabinet and the top has a scalloped look to it. I drew it on my computer to actual size. Now I need to transfer it to my wood.
How do you guys do that? Do you print on thick stock, cut out the pattern and then use it as a stencil? Do you tape the pattern to the wood and cut the pattern? Do you free hand off of what you did on the computer?
I will be using my Bosch jig saw to make the cut.
Thanks Craig Orput Cave Creek, AZ
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    You could do it that way.
    Or, you could put a piece of carbon paper between the pattern and the wood and trace the pattern.
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yes- all the above. Often, I'll just tape the paper down to the wood. If it is an intricate pattern, I'll use 3M "77" I think it is called, a high class contact cement. If I will have to make more than one of the same profile, I'll cut one on the scroll saw using 1/4 inch plywood, or maybe masonite. Than, I mark from that. If you want some sort of accuracy, and a nice surface finish, use that hunk of 1/4 inch plywood along with a flush trim router bit.
If you can not print out full size off your computer, print out small than use the old system of grids. Draw a series of lines on the pattern, than a larger series on lines on your workpeice.
What a crummy explanation that was. email me if you need further enlightenment. Though I bet you will have 10 other replies by morning.
-Dan

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On 3-Nov-2003, snipped-for-privacy@NOSPAMcomcast.net (Dan Valleskey) wrote:

Or use a pantograph.
Mike
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3m Spray adhesive.
Cut the pattern out - the spray it - put it on the work and cut it right thru the paper.

on
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it
pattern
cut
--
Nothing beats the bandwidth of a station wagon filled with DLT tapes.



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Suggest you try this if you have a laser printer. Print the pattern, lay the page face down on the wood, use an iron set at cotton and iron the back of the print. The pattern is transferred to the wood, I think. JG
Pops wrote:

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Note that this will mirror-reverse the pattern. For symmetrical patterns, this obviously isn't a problem, but if the pattern is asymmetrical, you'll want to invert it with your graphics program before you print it.
The same method works if you have an ink-jet printer, too -- just photocopy the printed pattern before ironing.

-- Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
How come we choose from just two people to run for president and 50 for Miss America?
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this
to
Or simply iron it on to the back side of the board.
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: Suggest you try this if you have a laser printer. Print the pattern, lay the : page face down on the wood, use an iron set at cotton and iron the back of the : print. The pattern is transferred to the wood, I think.
JGS rightly expresses some doubt.
It would be interesting to know whether anyone has actually been able to make a laser printer do this?
Jeff G
-- Jeff Gorman, West Yorkshire, UK Email address is username@ISP username is amgron ISP is clara.co.uk Website www.amgron.clara.net
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Earlier in this thread, I suggested that those who don't have a laser printer could photocopy the output from an inkjet printer, and transfer the photocopied image to the wood. That suggestion was not mere idle speculation; I've actually done that twice, and it works fine. Since laser printers and dry-toner photocopiers use basically the same process for imprinting images on paper, there is no reason to suppose that it would not work for a laser printer. Indeed, I applied the same reasoning in reverse when I assumed that, if it would work with a laser printer (as had been posted here a couple years ago), then it would surely work with a dry-toner copier. And it does.
-- Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
How come we choose from just two people to run for president and 50 for Miss America?
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And the best part of the whole thing is that you get to buy another "tool" (Iron) for the workshop!
wrote

lay the

of the

printer
speculation;
images on

that,
years
Miss America?
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Yes, it sure does work, also works with photocopies as well.

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It looks like the 3 leading methods here are:
1. Carbon paper and trace the design. With my shaky hands, not sure I want to use this method. I shake enough when I saw! 2. Glue the pattern down with 3M77 or other rubber cement. 3. Iron on from printed pattern.
Question: What do options 2 & 3 do to the wood. Does the glue absorb and stain? Does the iron "burn" the wood to a different color?
Thanks Pops
wrote

lay
of
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Cut back on the coffee! :-)

SWMBO and our 12-yo son have done a fair amount of scroll saw work, *always* using 3M77 to hold the pattern to the wood. They use mostly native North American hardwoods, and some holly and purpleheart. AFAIK, they have *never* had any problems with the adhesive staining the wood. I suppose that might be a problem with some of the oily tropical woods, but that's just a guess.
I'm sure that you could burn wood with an iron if you left it in one place long enough, but I haven't had a problem with that. I use the "cotton" setting on the iron, and keep it moving around -- just like you would to avoid scorching a shirt. It doesn't take long at all. Note that it *does* take more pressure than you would use ironing a shirt, to transfer a pattern to a board.
-- Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
How come we choose from just two people to run for president and 50 for Miss America?
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[...]

No, an iron does not. I ironed a few thin shavings (spruce and ivy) to make fancy bookmarks (first wetting the shavings with a plant mister, then ironing them flat and finally laminating them to keep them flat), and even on the hottest setting no discoloration was visible.
--
Dr. Juergen Hannappel http://lisa2.physik.uni-bonn.de/~hannappe
mailto: snipped-for-privacy@physik.uni-bonn.de Phone: +49 228 73 2447 FAX ... 7869
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Carbon paper under the pattern.
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Many ways. I have carbon paper to trace patterns. A sewing pattern wheel works. Or apply rubber cement (Elmers makes a good one) to the pattern and stick it to the wood.
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on
If you can't find carbon paper in this day and age, simply rub a soft pencil over the *back* of the paper where the lines are, tape the pattern in place and trace over the lines with a ballpoint pen. -- Ernie
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