how do you replace the blade on a circular saw?

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*Raises his hand*
I don't have a TS. The one I have access to can only rip to 12"
For large pieces, I have a number of guides I've built out of either Borg Birch or Baltic Birch plywood.
Almost all my sheet goods work is cut to finished size in one slice with the circular saw.
All my large panel glueups are cut to finished size with the circular saw.
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It's not just a case of "precision" work! I've got both an older Crapsman 7" and a newer PC 7 1/4" LH blade. The Crapsman gets used ONLY with a guide, the PC both free-hand and with it's own guide. Until you've experienced the difference the better saw and BASE can make, you find it hard to believe. The PC just seems to *glide* along the cut, and you have to *push* the Crapsman on its stamped steel base. Yes, I've tried cleaning, smoothing, waxing, you name it, still can't come close to the way the PC works.
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Nahmie
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Norman D. Crow wrote:

FWIW, my Dad had a Craftsman, I have worm-drive Skil. In practical terms I can't see any real difference between them except that my great grandchildren if I ever have any and if they are interested in such matters, will likely still be using the Skil.
What's special about the PC base?
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Not absolutely sure right this moment. This is the 743/843, now discontinued, replaced by their "MAG" series. I *think* the base is magnesium, ribbed, and powder-coated. I know that it slides along very nicely, and cuts beautifully, and has PLENTY of power. DAMHIKT!(kicked back on me when cutting free-hand once. My fault, board slipped off support.)
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Nahmie
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Norman D. Crow wrote:

I can see where the ribbing and possibly the powder-coating would help. FWIW, a piece of wide UHMW tape stuck on the shoe should smooth up the movement of any saw, the problem is that a 4" wide roll of the stuff costs more than the Porter Cable saw. I've got a big box of engineering samples of that kind of stuff that I collected over the years--sometimes I don't quite realize what I'm using until I use some of it up and go to replace it <grin>.

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On 30 Jun 2004 05:45:03 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@kreusch.com (Jay) wrote:

I do, when I can't get the piece to the table saw....
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You mean you wouldn't replace the stone axe with a nice sharp metal axe that will make your life a lot easier!

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My circular saw IS the stone axe of my tool selection. It is right there next to the Sawzall and chain saw.
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Absolutely. In my shop I have a collection of circular saws. I have an old B&D plastic wonder 7 1/4" that I bought a long time ago. It gets used only to cut nasty materials like masonry and the bushings scream all the while. I really should throw it out, but I don't want to use any of my better saws for this nasty work and so until it quits cutting, it stays in my shop. I also have a Milwaukee 7 1/4" saw that I like a lot. It's so steady in your hand, it never jumps when you hit the trigger. It's a bit of a pain to set the depth, but it's a Milwaukee, so you're really not allowed to complain about that. I've got a couple of other old timers laying under the work bench as well, but the one I grab the most now is this really cheap 5 1/2" B&D that was I brother's and I ended up with it after he was killed. It's light as a feather, very easy to cut with, jumps more than any saw should when you hit the trigger, so you quickly learn not to pull the trigger right at the cut, but is just so doggoned easy to use that I use it most. It's a junk saw by every definition, and it will break some day, I'm sure, but until it does, I'll just keep on using it.
Just my little story - but then again, I'm one of those guys with a 30+ year old Craftsman Model 100 Table saw, and I love the thing. Still can't see any reason to upgrade it. I put a decent fence system on it, built extensions, and it's rewarded me by acting like a more expensive saw. On the other hand, I'm also one of those guys that ditched a Craftsman 1/4" router and bought a DeWalt 618B.
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On 28 Jun 2004 00:17:36 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com (c a) vaguely proposed a theory ......and in reply I say!:
remove ns from my header address to reply via email
You are either a twit or a medium-good TROLL.
reply with thanks to the nice gentlemen who have helped, ya'all.

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