How do you handle this on your Craftman Tablesaw


Hello,
I have inherited a Craftman Table saw from my Dad. I think I can recollect that my Grandparents got it for him when I was a youngin'.
I just purchased a new belt for it, I don't think my Dad ever put a new one on it. Anyway, in order to raise or lower the blade I have to loosen a bolt on the motor pivot and then retighten when I have the blade height set.
How is this suppose to work? I sure don't recall seeing any of the home improvement shows or Norm adjusting this bolt when raising or lowering the blade.
Thank you, Fred
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That bolt is not supposed to be that tight. Just snug enough to keep the motor from "jumping". It should be loose enough to allow for raising the blade.
Max D.
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AHHHHHHHHHH, I get it. I know I have ran the saw with that bolt loose and the motor jumps around and the belt slaps around and the blade slips.
I wonder what would happen if I put in a longer bolt with a tense spring under it.
Thanks, Fred
Max wrote:

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On Sun, 27 Mar 2005 09:49:23 -0500, Frederick Wilson

The design of a contractors saw is such that the weight of the motor provides the sole tension on the belt. You can adjust the tension by sizing the belt (or moving the motor) to vary the angle at which the motor hangs on the mount (the Craftsman saw's motor mount is on two rails which slide in and out of the trunnion assembly).
Somewhere out around 45 will give the maximum tension, but in reality, you'll be better off with something less than that. I don't have a magic number to tell you.
Because of that design, one is limited in what one may expect in replacing the motor with one of higher power. There is only so much power that can be transmitted with that system. 2 HP (REAL HP, not Sears HP) or more is a waste of time.
--
LRod

Master Woodbutcher and seasoned termite
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There should be a tension washer under the bolt (when the saw was new). A longer bolt and a spring sounds like a good idea.
Max D.
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Frederick Wilson wrote:

The purpose of the bolt is to reduce vibration of the saw. There is suppose to be a special washer on the bolt that allows you to tighten to the point the bolt doesn't vibrate loose but still allows the part to slip. If you tighten it too much, and don't loosen it when you raise the saw, it will shear the bolt. That was the condition of my dad's saw until I got the broken piece out. Just put any washer on it next to the head, tighten until vibration decrease with a running saw but not much more than finger tight. Lift the motor up by hand (or try) to assure that it will move with only slight binding. (or keep a small wrench handy to loosen and tighten it every time you raise and lower the saw blade.
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