How do you clean tablesaw blade?

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I see the stuff advertised in the woodworking catalogs but was wondering what each of you use to clean your blades?
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Oven cleaner and a brass brush. Use gloves.
~m

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Rob, I was setting my blades aside in a stack to be shipped to an outside source to be sharpened, when I noticed how dirty the baldes were. I had purchased a blade cleaner kit from Rockler and thought what better time to test the product. WOW, What a difference!!!! My blades did not need to be sharpened, they needed to be cleaned of resin and dark pitch. The kit has a plastice wash basin, the cleaner, and a wire brush.
I like the commercial blade cleaner better than oven cleaner for two reasons, I had an ol' sharpening service man tell me that oven cleaner attacks the bonding agent that they use to glue the carbide onto the saw blank, plus the oven cleaner's has strong fumes.
When I used Rockler's blade cleaner, I let the blades soak over night. Then I used the wire brush and it simply removed all the pitch. I then rinsed with hot water, dried the blades and sprayed with Top Cote to retard the rust. The kit worked very well for me and I was very pleased with this method. There are several others as well.
Good Luck, Mike from American Sycamore
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One thing I noticed about the Rockler kit was the brush started coming apart. I lost about 12 or more bristles when cleaning the gullets. Then again its not a huge complaint, brass brushes are cheap and I already had a plastic handled one that I know won't come apart...
Other than that the kit worked okay.
--
The software said it ran under Windows 98/NT/2000, or better.
So I installed it on Linux...
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You know, the first time I cleaned my blades I used oven cleaner and it worked great, but what a mess. I bought an old drill press and used simple green to clean it up -- did a great job. Since then I've used simple green for my router bits and my saw blades. I just squirt it on a toothbrush and scrub away at the teeth/blades, and the resin/gunk comes right off. It's great and pretty non-toxic from what I understand as well.
Mike

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Sprayway.
dave
Rob wrote:

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I've been using the CMT orange stuff but before used Simple Green. I don't like using oven cleaners because they are caustic to me. The CMT and Simple Green both are skin friendly. I have enough trouble just not cutting my self on the blade, hahahaha.
Bernie

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409 and a brass brush or the Green stuff and a brass brush...
Let it set for 10-30 min, depending on how bad it is, use the brush to clean the gullets, dry then wax or spray on your favorite rust preventative.
Bob S.

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Let the blade soak for five minutes. The crud will wipe right off. Rinse the blade clean, and dry it.
-- Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
How come we choose from just two people to run for president and 50 for Miss America?
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Rob said:

I use Simple Green and a really stiff nylon brush. For those hard to remove deposits I will sometimes carefully use a brass brush. I put the blade in an oil drain pan that fits the blade perfectly, and the high sides catch the crap that brushing slings everywhere. Spray the blade down, and soak for 10-15 minutes - then brush.
Greg G.
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Woodworkers have used oven cleaner for a long time but blade manufacturers are warning against it saying it can attack the brazing that holds carbide teeth in place. Some say it can affect the carbide itself. I have a story about lceaning blades, including one of these warnings at the link below.
http://www.newwoodworker.com/clnblades.html
Tom Hintz www.newwoodworker.com
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Tom Hintz wrote:

I think the site is mainly advertising the blade cleaner. As for being extremely careful with blades and worrying about the great strain they are under, I don't buy it. Sure you want to be careful and not ruin the polish, and most of us are pretty careful. But, a scratch on the blade isn't going to do much unless you are running it way faster than the recommended maximum and/or it's just a piece of crap. I know my 10" blades run at about 3,000 rpm, way lower than the blade maximums. I have no fear of using a metal tool or a steel wire brush to clean a blade. How do you think they got that brushed finish on some blades?
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When folks like Frued say there are substances you should not use on a blade, I think that is worthy of putting in a story, and listening to. There are too many alternatives available to go ahead and use caustic cleaners.
I do wish I was making all this money some seem so sure I am though!
Tom Hintz www.newwoodworker.com
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It's been many years and even more threads since Simple Green or similar cleaners was recommended by many to clean blades. If non-caustics do the job, why would anyone who's read this same thread many times continue to use lye/oven cleaner?? Do you have a stockpile of oven cleaner? Never wanted to try something else? Disagree and think lye works better? Inquiring minds want to know.
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Some of us are just stick in the mud types. I havent't tried Simple Green on saw blades yet. When I do and if it works well, I will continue to use it. Occassionally you get burned stuff, does Simple Green clean work as well on it as lye does?
Cape Cod Bob wrote:

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Castrol Super Clean has worked well for me on saw blades and router bits.
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On Sat, 03 Jan 2004 14:40:37 -0500, Cape Cod Bob

Sometimes Simple Green just dosen't cut it.

I ALWAYS use green chemicals first, for my own health. Sometimes the stronger stuff is necessary. I've cleaned blades with oven cleaner, simple green, and citrus cleaners. If someone has a can of oven cleaner handy, I don't think they really need to run out and buy something else to clean a blade.

Only on real tough stuff. "Better" is a bad descriptor, "faster" is better. <G>
Barry
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Simple Green. A 10" blade fits perfectly inside the lid of a five gallon plastic bucket. Let it soak a while and brush it off with stiff bristles.
Joel
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Oven cleaner, orange cleaner, or simple green, whatever's easiest to grab. I scrub, if necessary, with a plastic bristle brush.
Barry
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'Simple Green' soak, followed by a scrub with an old toothbrush . . . if needed.
Ron Magen Backyard Boatshop

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