How do I rout a panel out of a frame?


I have a cabinet with a plywood panel door. The plywood didn't look too good when I finished it, and a year later it looks even worse. I have to fix it.
I would just as soon not replace the frame it is in. My plan was to rout the back off, remove the bad panel and put a better one in. I am not quite sure how I was going to retain the new panel, but it can't be that hard.
But now I realize that to do this on a router table, I will have the work between the bit and the fence. Last time I tried that I got a rather nasty kick back; but I don't really see any other options.
I am tempted to forget it and take vinigar and water to the glue. Has anyone ever succeeded at that?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Toller wrote:

Using my 'butcher first, fix last' technique I would: Drill a hole in the plywood then cut around very close to the frame leaving just a strip of plywood all the way around. Then maybe you could grab the middle of the longest side and pull on it to get the remaining plywood to break. Then you might be able to rout using a bearing guided bit riding where the plywood used to be (or just carefully chisel the frame). Or: Build a simple jig out of plywood with a fence (perpindicular piece) for the router to ride against. Screw the door down to the jig through the panel your are taking out so that the fence is the right distance away and rout without fear of kickback. You could do some fancy clamping and stop blocks but that is not true butchery.

Never tried.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
"Toller" wrote in message

Rout it out with a hand held router, and a guide clamped to the door to guide the router.
--
www.e-woodshop.net
Last update: 8/21/06
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

What about using the router out of the table?
Lay the frame face down, and use a straight edge. Position the straight edge to the inside of the rail/stile so that the router base would ride along the rail/stile. Set the bit to cut just deep enough to go through the plywood panel. Do this for all 4 sides and the plywood panel will drop out and you will be left with a nice clean rabbit (once you square up the corners).
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Toller wrote:

It isn't, rout out the back (or front) of the frame so there is a rabbet rather than a dado then "stick" the panel with molding.
--

dadiOH
____________________________
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

it let me put the TS fence 40" from the bit and run the frame against that. It wasn't the world's smoothest cut, but not bad. I cut the corners out with a multimate.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On the back, so the molding joints don't show?? Wilson

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Oh, that would have been better, wouldn't it! (yes, of course on the back...)
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
How about just trying to veneer over the ugly ply. Toller wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I thought about that, but it didn't seem like a good project for my first time veneering.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.