How do I make a jig for this cut?


Hi, I am building a play system for my kids and it will have a wood roof with "shiplap" roof boards made of 1x6s. Basically, the top of each piece is beveled down and sits under a rabbet in the next piece. I am trying to figure out the easiest way to cut the long shallow bevel on each piece. I would assume some sort of table saw jig is the only way to go. Any thoughts on what to create for this? Thanks in advance!
-Rob
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If I understand you correctly, you're talking about boards with a cross-section similar to this: (dramatically out of scale due to the constraints of ascii art)
__ | \ | \ | \ | \ |_ \ |___|
and you want to know how to cut the bevel.
Tough to do on a table saw, unless you're using narrow boards, because of the limited depth of cut. If I were going to *make* boards like this, I'd cut the bevel with a bandsaw, and the rabbet with a dado set on the table saw.
But if I were going to *use* boards like this... I would *buy* them. Not make them. Not worth the hassle IMO.
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yup. That taper is going to be difficult on a 1x6. It would take two passes on a typical table saw. I'd buy the boards that way but since it is just a play structure why not just lap them like shingles?
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And if you want it smoother, belt sander time!
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rob wrote:

I'm having hard time following your description. Ship-lap is simply a rabbet on opposite sides. Either way you orient the joint isn't a good choice for a roof--if the upper piece lays on top of the lower, the joint is reasonably weather-tight but will hold water in the lower rabbet. If you flip it over it will have a direct path through. Can you sketch what you have in mind?
As for cutting it, what you're describing as I imagine it would seem to be an edge chamfer bit on a router.
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The ascii version you posted is exactly what I am trying to do. I didn't even think about the bandsaw...I just got one this year and I always forget I have it there to use! I think I might be able to rig a jig on there to cut it with, and then rabbet the back with the dado head.
Duane : Maybe they are not really 'shiplap' after all if I get your description of shiplap. I called them by this name because thats what the brochure for the play system calls them. They are exactly as the ascii art shows.
I guess I might try looking for some premade pieces for this if its not easy enough on the bandsaw. Thanks for the replies folks! Much appreciated.
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rob wrote:

Well, let's see if I can cobble something up... _____________ __| __| |_____________|
Something like that is what I was taught to call shiplap--but in W KS we ain't got no ships so maybe that isn't exactly right. :) You can see if it lays as shown left edge up, there's a collection point in the corner. If you think of the right end up, there's a flow path through, so you understand my previous concern.
If I steal Doug's example art (thanks, Doug, I'm not sure I'd have gotten this one, took me long enough for the above w/ the broke arm typing :) ) __ | \ | \ | \ | \ |_ \ |___|
I do see how it would work to shed water ok. (BTW, that's a variation of what I was taught to call "half-lap", but that again may not be "offical".)
What about not making the angled section not quite so long and using a beveled panel-raiser setup to leave a 1/4" lip? Something like (even more exagerated)
_ | | | \ | \ | | |_ | |__|
I'd think it a little hard w/ nominal 1x of sizable length to do the taper on the bandsaw regularly (not impossible, just more difficult owing to the flexibility of the material).
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[...]

If you do them on a badsaw you should consider making two with every cut, reducing waste to a minimum:
--- ----------- | \ \ |__| | \ \ | | \ \ | | \ \ | |__ \ \ | | | \ \ | --------- ---
Should be easy: Tilt bandsaw table (or attach auxilary wooden table with fixed fence stub), saw strock....
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Note that doing so leaves the roughsawn surface exposed to the weather, which may not be what the OP wants. If he wants the smooth sides exposed, the rabbets should be cut on the bandsawn faces.
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Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
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Look here: http://www.wrcla.org/cedarspecs/cedarsiding/lapsiding/overview.asp
If pattern #101 is close enough to what you're after... that's trivial on a shaper, with the right cutters. Which I just happen to have. If you're in or near Indianapolis, email me, and we can talk about it. (see my sig for real email address)

I wouldn't even *think* about doing this myself, unless I needed only a couple of pieces. Too much hassle. You shouldn't have any trouble finding what you want already made, at a real lumberyard. Note that Home Depot, Lowe's, Menards, etc. are *not* real lumberyards.
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Again, thanks for the replies fellas. Some good ideas here. I may try the 2-from-1 board approach which sounds good on the bandsaw. I can see it may be really difficult to set up though. I also will check my local lumberyards (Minneapolis) and see the cost for what I want in precut panels. I wanted to do it myself mainy because I bought all the lumber I need so I would be stuck with the remainder if I get something else. On this front, does anyone know if Menards would let me return lumber?
Heres's another question to pose to y'all regarding lumberyards and big timber beams : For this project I needed some big ol' cedar 4x6 beams for the swing beam and fort supports. I had to special order them from the lumberyard. I ordered 2 12'ers and 3 10'ers. When they came in and I got em home, I see 2 of the 10'ers have fairly prominent cracks down them that look to go most of the way through and go probably 1/2 to 3/4 of the way down the beam. If I used these as planned for structural supports, I think they would be very prone to failure when I put a couple big bolts through them. Thus these 2 I am returning to the yard for a refund. (Which they will give me...nice fella) The guy said he cannot guarantee that others I order would not have cracks here, due to the nature of their size. Am I wrong to expect mostly clear and sound beams if they are milling them special? (And they are pricey). I am basing my system on Rainbow's construction methods, which use 4x6s in a lot of places, so it's not an unusual size to expect to get in good shape is it? Thanks!
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rob wrote:

W/ 1x stovk to start from? I'd say so! You have router?
...

It depends on your definition of "good shape" is...the ones you get will soon look just like the ones you have if they don't when they arrive. It's impossible to dry timber of that size w/o checking and you ain't gonna' cause it to fail, trust me!!!
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Yup, bandsaw. Until I read that I was going to tell you this. Some years ago I built a customized picture frame without a bandsaw. I calculated the amount of lift needed on one side of the piece to accomplish the degree of bevel needed. I glued that to a like board and ran it through the planer taking small cuts until it reached the proper profile. Then, taking that board I glued a shoe to the bottom and another to the end of the board and used it as a sled to carry the succeeding pieces through the planer. Easier than it sounds.

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rob wrote:

Of course, one alternative that would provide a very similar visual effect would be 6" T&G siding w/ the shaped edge--sorry, I seem to have lost the link to a very good catalog of "standard" profiles but the link below shows a similar profile as their "EWP 106 or 105 drop siding"
http://www.woodsiding.com/pattern.htm
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The local lumberyard had exactly the profile I was looking for, and the price was decent, so I bought the siding premade. That will save some serious time. Thanks a lot guys for the suggestions.
Rob
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When all else fails, buy it down the street!! LOL
Reminds me of a corporate communications job I got hired on. I had some expertise in corporate communications and had the ability to bind many types of publications between my business and some sales reps. I was told to prepare a number of different publication models and make a very comprehensive report to the company brass. I was given a good budget and encouraged to spend it.
Sooooo...................., I spent their money. I prepared all the examples. I interviewed many people to determine exactly what they needed for their report formats. I wrote a compehensive report. And I got up and knocked their socks off. Until I got to the end of the presentation. It turned out that the best format for them was simply a standard three ring binder. Ya know, what we all used in high school.
It was embarrassing to end on that note. But it was the simple solution. I gave them all the evidence they needed. Not a high buck or high tech approach. But it perfectly fit their needs. The only thing they had to do was to buy some three ring binders and some three holed paper for their printers and copiers.
They thanked me for saving them some big bucks and were amazed that the did not think of it themselves. Sometimes simple is best. Many times simple is best.
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the engineer's mantra
KISS
keep it simple stupid
ml
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rob expostulated:
| I am trying to figure out the easiest way to cut the long | shallow bevel on each piece
Seems to me that you could do this with a planer...
-- Morris Dovey DeSoto Solar DeSoto, Iowa USA http://www.iedu.com/DeSoto/solar.html
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OK, I misunderstood what you needed. Any chance you can do it with several passes on a jointer? Mine allows for rabbeting. If you can see to do that, be absolutely sure to move the material though with pushers, not hands.
I cut bevels, as in door panels, using a radial arm saw with a home-made guide. They cut quickly and easily.
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rob wrote:

I have never seen siding used for a roof, which is what you are doing. Unless the roof is very steep, water will linger in the joints. How will you nail it without leaving exposed nails? Exposure to the sun, wind and rain at a roof pitch will be brutal on siding with expansion-contraction, not to mention cupping. If it is not going to be exposed to the weather, it makes no difference of course, but just because somebody puts it in a set of plans doesn't mean it's a good idea. I would substitute wood shingles or something intended for roofs. Sam
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