how do i install In-ceiling speakers?

hi, I am not sure if this is the right group to ask, but since everyone sounds like a pro at what they do, I thought I'll try.
I've purchased 2 sets of In-ceiling speakers I'd like to install in the kitchen. We live in a "typical" Canadian suburban house with basement, ground level (where the kitchen and the living room are) and second floor. I'd like to know how I'd bring the speaker wire from the living room where the stereo is to the kitchen ceiling. Has anyone done this sort of thing? Where I am not sure is the 'fishing' the line part. How do I bring the wire up to the kitchen ceiling when the roof is stud construction?
Thanks. apkesh
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Since the kitchen ceiling is just below the flooring of the second floor, would this work for you:
- fish wire down the first floor wall behind the stereo from the second floor; - run the wire around the second floor walls just above the baseboard from just above the stereo to just above the speakers; - drop wire into the space between the first floor ceiling and the second floor floor.
It may be desirable to cut access panels in the floor of the second floor, just above each speaker, in order to install and service each speaker. Cut carefully, then frame under the cuts to form a lip for the panels to rest on, as it may be in a traffic area and thus, load-bearing.
Though the roof is stud construction, since there is a second floor above the kitchen, how is the roof a concern? Is the area above the kitchen used for human occupancy or is it an attic for storage?
On 24 Jan 2004 11:49:51 -0800, snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com (Apkesh) wrote:

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Hi Thomas, thanks for the info. But how does one 'fish' the wire? Both kitchen and living room (where the stereo is) are on the ground floor. On the second floor are the bedrooms. thanks. ap
(Apkesh) wrote:

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Most home centers, hardware stores and electrical supply stores carry an item called fish tape or fish rod. Fish tape is a length of spring-steel wire (or tape) sufficiently stiff that it can be pushed down a hole in the top of a wall. At the end is a small loop. Once the wire is pushed down the wall cavity and is located in the wall, another hole is cut in the wall behind the stereo. By attaching the actual speaker wire to the loop at the end of the tape, the speaker wire is pulled up inside the wall cavity when the fishing wire is retrieved by pulling it back from the second floor. Fish tape is about $15 for a 50' spool. Fishing rod is usually a set of fiberglass sections which can be connected to form a stiff pole which can also be pushed down the wall.
On 25 Jan 2004 16:05:23 -0800, snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com (Apkesh) wrote:

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In my situation, my second floor joists ran perpendicular between the speakers and parallel wire routing was not an option. This made the use of a fish tape only possible for one speaker. Directly above is an oak hardwood floor, so top access was impossible without ruining the floor. I had to carefully cut a 1 ft wide piece of drywall between both speakers, leaving the location of the intended holes intact. This allowed me to easily access behind the speakers while mounting, etc. I had to drill a hole through each joist between the speakers to feed the wires through. I was able to screw the original piece of cut drywall back into place and tape it up nicely. (Even if you ruin the original, it's easy to cut new pieces.) It's not as hard as it sounds, but if you feel uncomfortable doing it, you can just hire a drywall guy to do the finishing touches at a fairly reasonable price. (It's not a lot of work after, especially after the pieces are screwed back in.)
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