How do I cut a hole in a cast iron wood stove?

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snipped-for-privacy@fellspt.charm.net wrote:

Yeah! You don't flame 'cut' it, you melt it away. Makes for a very ragged, pitted sloppy "cut".
Harry K
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When you get to the machine shop, they should be able to give you directions to the local welding shop. It's a round about way of getting directions but it should work.

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DoubleD wrote:

That might work if the machinist has a plasma arc torch or similar as a regular oxy/acetylene one will not cut cast. He will also have to be up on welding cast. Both should be a part of any welding shop so not a real problem.
Harry K
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Thanks everyone for all the advice/info. The back panel of the stove I ended up cutting through was just sheet metal; kind of a wrapper around the interior cast-iron fire box. I didn't realize that at first because there was *another* sheet metal wrapper around it for aesthetic purposes. As one person suggested, this space is for preheating the air that feeds the fire. It should be no problem to patch it once I'm done. So I got some access to the melted plastic, but it's very hard hard and well adhered, and I can't reach most of it well enough to chip it out. So now on to plan B - drag the thing outside, get it hot enough to melt the plastic, scrape out what I can, and burn the rest off with a propane torch. I'm still concerend that this thing will smell like burning plastic forever after. Hopefully I can get it hot enough for long enough to avoid that. Thanks again.
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fork wrote:
<snip> > So now on to plan B - drag the thing outside, get it hot > enough to melt the plastic, scrape out what I can, and burn the rest > off with a propane torch. I'm still concerend that this thing will > smell like burning plastic forever after. <snip>
Don't send a boy to do a man's job.
The typical torch supplied with a bottle for the home owner is basically a drug addicts tool.
To do this job, you need a BURNER.
As far as smoke, smell, etc, 2,800F for 0.1 second solves a lot of problems.
Trust me, been there, done that.
If you know someone in the asphalt parking lot paving business, you are in luck.
Asphalt people have a 500,000 BTU, cast iron, hand held burners used to seal the seams between passes.
A case of beer and some sweet talk, they might just stop buy and burn it out for you.
There won't be any residue.
I used 2 of these burners (1,000,000 BTU) to melt and pour 20,000 lbs of lead into over 650, 30 lb pigs.
Still have the burners.
If you are in SoCal, maybe we can work something out.
Lew
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Good idea Lew, I like the way you think! Plan B-revised: score some rock, use propane torch per suggestion, molten plastic will no longer be my #1 concern.
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fork wrote:
> Good idea Lew, I like the way you think! Plan B-revised: score some > rock, use propane torch per suggestion, molten plastic will no longer > be my #1 concern. >
Was involved in the combustion burner business for a while.
Main thing I learned is there is no substitute for BTU's.
Same rule that applies to a knife fight.
If you want to win, use a .357 mag or bigger.<G>
What I'm trying to say is forget the rocks, get a bigger burner.<G>
Lew
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Lew Hodgett wrote:

What kind of ammo do you think? Normally I'd be concerned about riccochets, but being on crack will take care of that. The .357 will help with the first part of the plan too. Keep those ideas a comin'!
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I suggest if you want to try and chip the stuff off, do that cold. If you want to burn it off don't even bother with the torch. Stoke the stove with a few hardwood logs and open up the air vents. The heat from the combustion will reduce to ask the bits of plastic and once it is burned off there will be only ashes left.
Prove it to your self. Stick an iron bar in the vise, heat up the end with a torch and set a piece of plastic on the bar. The plastic will melt then burn off. With a fire blazing inside the stove, the temperature of the outside of that fire box is going to be at least 800 degrees F. Plastic is made from oil and once oil is burned away not much is left to stink.
--
Roger Shoaf
If you are not part of the solution, you are not dissolved in the solvent.
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Glad that you did not cut in the cast iron. Like some said it is easier to burn it out with a real hot fire. If you cut in the cast iron and you every had a house fire, the insurance company would surely use that as an excuse not to pay your claim.
Eric
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to
Not surely. Not even likely.
--

-Mike-
snipped-for-privacy@alltel.net
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Mike Marlow wrote:

Indeed, they would almost certainly pay the claim without a peep.
Of course come renewal time the "not surely" and "not likely" would come into play and with the collusion between insurers you'd find the same "not likely" from most of them.
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easier
an
Agreed. Then again, that result is also very common after any significant claim from a homeowner. We had snow weight damage and the claim was paid, no problem. Upon renewal time... you guessed it. We were invited not to play with Nationwide any longer. Nothing wrong with the design or the construction either. This was during a winter when buildings were collapsing all around from the snow. Ours is not an unusual situation either.
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-Mike-
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In our area, they call it 'reducing their exposure'. That they have been 'too successful' in marketing in our area, and need to spread out their risk to other areas. It's the insurance game. TANSTAAFL.
Patriarch, 34 years with the same carrier...
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And how many claims?
--
Ron Hock
HOCK TOOLS www.hocktools.com
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Ron Hock wrote:

Three claims and you're out.
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Fortunately, very few. And I'd prefer to keep it that way, thank you very much.
I like very much the replacement blade I got for my Stanley #5, btw. Need to go looking for a few more of those...
Patriarch, member, Diablo Woodworkers
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