How do I cut a 4x4 post?

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Ok, I've tried cutting the end with a sawzall, the ends come out uneven. I tried with a circular, I can't ever seem to get the cuts to line up when I flip the wood to do the other side. And the miter saw I have just isn't big enough.
I've resorted to having Home Depot cut them there, but they don't do precision cuts, and sometimes they are too busy and I don't want to wait.
Add in the fact that sooner or later I'm going to have rough sawn 4x4 that I will have to cut myself regardless.
Besides buying a really big miter/radial arm saw, any suggestions?
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On Fri, 16 Mar 2007 08:02:12 -0500, -@-.com wrote:

A good, sharp old fashion crosscut **GASP** handsaw.
Mark http://home.mchsi.com/~xphome /
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"Markem" wrote in message .
Do you and live in a state with no DST, or did you just not set your system clocks?
Just curious ...
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Illinois, so yes we have DST, the system is suppose to set itself and it did. Maybe Agent picks up the originating message time zone??? Ah the sweet mysteries of life.
Mark (sixoneeight) = 618
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All power tools have limitations and, if you're going to "work wood", the sooner you run into that wall the better.
So do what your forefathers did ... use a hand saw.
Either to finish your circular saw cut, or by wrapping a line on the top and edge next to you and taking your time and following it, using a clamped on block of wood as a guide if necessary.
If you don't have a good crosscut saw, now's the time to get one.
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Take your 4x4, put it on a workbench or sawhorses. Measure off and clamp 2 straightedges to each side at the exact same spots (i.e. parallel to each other). Use each clamped straightedge to run the circular saw against. Should get you a pretty close cut both sides.
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Actually, you can take that idea a bit farther.
Make a "saddle" from 3/4" stock that fits pretty snug over the post. Using the top edge of the saddle as a straight edge, cut the post with a cirular saw.
The accuracy of the saddle will determine the accuracy of the cut.
A basic handsaw might be in order here.
HappyGilmore wrote:

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I hate this cut because it is usually at the top of a fence post and the cut is above my head. Therefore the saw dust falls all over me. Use a square to extend the line to 3 surfaces of the post. Extend the blade on your circle saw to full depth. Cut along the line all the way across the post. Move to the next side and line and engage the saw blade into the previous cut and use that cut to help guide the start of the next cut. Repeat on the 3rd side.
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I have a 10" Craftsman miter saw, and it cut's a 4x4 without any issues, what size miter saw do you have?
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Thanks, for the suggestions guys. You gave me a few options to try. I think the saddle idea might be the best for my application.
By the way I'm GenX so forgive my ignorance when I ask: what's a handsaw? ;)
I think saddle and handsaw together might work the best. I have a portable band saw that might do the trick too now that I think about it.
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On Fri, 16 Mar 2007 12:19:08 -0500, -@-.com wrote:

And a couple more facts for the lurkers and trolls. It isn't like I've sat in my garage and tried this a couple hundred times and am still not getting it. I've done it once or twice and have had HD do it ever since, I was simply wondering if there was a technique for it. Given the amount of replies and different techniques this topic has spurred I would hardly deem it as trite and effortless.
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On Sat, 17 Mar 2007 09:24:35 -0500, -@-.com wrote:

Generally I use a speed square as a guide for the circular saw, I will mark the cut on all 4 sides. If it is installed in the ground and you want to level cut a guide you can clamp to the post instead of the speed square. Let the saw do the work feed it gently into the cut. A good hand saw could finish the cut, it will never be perfect though covering the top of the post though hides a lot of sins. If you bury the cut in the ground a treating the cut with preservative is probably best practice. I also do not set posts in concrete but rather in stone packed around it, if it was a hinge side of a gate then I might set it in concrete.
Better?
Mark
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On Mar 16, 9:02 am, -...@-.com wrote:

Circular saw and a speed square or homemade t-square guide.
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Father Haskell wrote:

Finally some sanity. Yeah, I know there ain't no sanity clause. If the post's in the ground frst cut with a speed square and circular saw then use that cut as a guide.Just go around the post.Same thing if it's on the ground just rotate the post. Easy. Phil Brown
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-@-.com wrote:

Either get more accurate with your skilsaw or use a power sander on the cuts. This is sort of silly.
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Especially since dead square post tops are undesirable. Chamfered or sloped tops don't hold rainwater, and will last longer.
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wrote:

The OP never said anything about post tops...
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Why would anyone want to cut the part that sits buried under 3 feet of concrete square?
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wrote:

LOL, the OP just stated he wanted to know how to cut a 4x4 post!!! Unless I missed a post somewhere, he didn't specify if it were in the ground. Considering he said he has Home Depot cut them for him, I don't imagine they are. :)
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On Fri, 16 Mar 2007 16:25:19 -0400, "Locutus"

It's for a bed post, sorry if I led anyone astray. Although I'm learning a lot about other techniques even if not for my application.
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