how do I clamp this?


Hello,
I'm building a candlestick table, and I can't figure out how to glue and clamp the legs to the center column. Any ideas? The link below is not my table, but it'll give you the idea of what I'm dealing with. Thanks.
http://www.custommade.com/gallery/furniture-MA/Candlestick-table.html
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"dustyone" wrote...

Dovetail the tenons. No clamps required. Done correctly, no glue required. Unless you really lick the smell of hot hide glue.
A quick & dirty way would be to make a square tenon, leave a shoulder on the legs, and clamp with a strap clamp, then cut off the shoulders afterward. But you'll always think less of yourself for not using the correct dovetail tenon for the job.

Timothy Juvenal
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Correct however, technically they are called sliding dovetails. No clamps required.
Dave
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"Teamcasa" wrote...

I think you're right, but my brain keeps wanting to call them dovetail tenons. I'm checking Osburns book "Measured Drawings of Early American Furniture" - I think he shows some tables like this and lets see what he calls the joint...
... OK he has a drawing on page 30 of a "tripod teakettle stand" using the joint in question...I'll check the text...
...hmmm... he doesn't say; he just calls them dovetails. He also draws a section of the joint showing no flats on the column where the legs attach, and the shoulders cut to match. It seems to me this would be an easier way to get a really snug fit - by making the edges of the leg at the dovetail a little proud, they would compress into the column and be supper snug.
Any rate, I'm sure sliding dovetail is the common modern term for the joint, but hopefully I can be forgiven for insisting on thinking of it as a dovetail tenon.
-- Timothy Juvenal www.rude-tone.com/work.htm
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Choir in background singing -- All is forgiven -- ;-)
Dave
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dustyone wrote:

They had a similiar table plan in Woodcraft magazine. The guy ended up making "male" dovetails" at the end of the legs.. basically like tenons. On the center column (which was round from being turned on a lathe), he flattened three areas and made the female part of the dovetail (mortise).. Therefore, he could just slide them in.
Another option would be to use a band clamp. Bessey makes a nice one, but you'd still probably want some kind of tenon or fastener to hold the leg in place while you're tightening the band.
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A few brads until the glue dries. :)

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Why do you think you need to clamp dovetail joints?
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As others have responded a sliding dovetail is the traditional method used. If you have already cut mortise & tenons or used dowels then one way would be to clamp an auxillliary piece of wood to one face of each leg so it extends above and below the joint. Then use 2 band clamps, one above and one below the joint.
Art

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Thank you to all.
CB
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I have made one of these. I used sliding dovetails. To make the mortises I built a custom sled for my lathe to hold a router with a dovetail bit. My lathe has an index pin that makes a perfect 120 degree rotation. You want a snug, but not too tight, fit. The glue holds it together well. I did not use any clamps. Traditionally, an underside circular metal plate with three arms would be screwed in but that's not necessary with today's super-strong glues. BTW, if you taper the sides of the legs you'll get a better, more delicate look. I did my tapering on the jointer but you could use a belt sander.

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