How do I chamfer the inner circumference of a Hole?

Hi all,
I am not a woodworking hobbyist and no one ever confused my woodworking skills with those of Norm Abram. However, I do diddle from time to time with small woodworking projects and repairs. I am confronted with a problem that probably has an easy solution but I don't know what it may be.
Specifically, I want to apply 30 degree and 45 degree chamfers to the inner circumference of holes I have drilled in wood pieces. The holes range in diameter from " to 1". I do have a bench drill press and I know there has to be a bit of some type that will do the job but Google searches haven't pinpointed the tool(s) I need (or my keywords are lacking). I had thought of using 30 and 45 degree routing chamfering bits but this might be dangerous as the drill press is not a router. Any input from you gentlemen on how this 'WOOD' best be accomplished on my bench drill press 'WOOD' be appreciated.
Tx,
Mark
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A couple ideas come to mind. First, you could try using a larger drill bit and just touch it to the hole. That will put a drill bit angled chamfer on your hole.
You could also look at counter sink bits. IDK if they come in different sizes/angles, but it's worth looking on your next trip to the hardware store.
I don't see anything wrong with chucking a router bit in a drill press, and clamping the piece down and slowly slowly lowering the bit into the hole. Clamping the work piece down is essential, as you're trying to drill, not route your hole.
Puckdropper
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Sounds fine to me. You could lower the bit into the middle of the hole (assuming your workpiece is thicker than the bearing on the chamfer bit), and if the bit is big enough, just slowly lower it enough to chamfer your hole. If your hole is bigger than the bit diameter (likely for a 30 degree chamfer bit, I presume), you could lower the bit, lock the spindle so it doesn't go back up, and then carefully move the workpiece around under the bit, allowing the bearing to follow the inside of your hole. I'd turn up the speed on your DP, and just take off a little bit at a time so the bit doesn't grab the wood. Alternatively, you could buy an inexpensive laminate trimmer (I believe Harbor Freight has one that's frequently on sale for $20, and Craftsman and Ryobi have models that are in the $70-80 range IIRC) and do this the right way. Good luck and stay safe, Andy
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wrote:

That works fine for countersinking a screw head in a lot of cases, but bear in mind that a properly sharpened bit will have an angle of 135*. Divide that in two, and you're talking about a interior angle of 67.5*, not the 30* or 45* the OP was looking for.

There ya go. For a 30* "taper", you'll want a 60* countersink, and for a 45* "taper", you'll want a 90*. I don't recall seeing too many 60* csks, but the 90* should be fairly common. If you can't find a 60* one, you could try using a reamer that has the correct angle.
Since the OP says he's not a woodworker, it should be pointed out that you need to buy the countersink oversized and drill down until the mouth of the hole is the correct width. Trying to get one that is exactly the right size is just going to be an exercise in frustration unless he's really lucky.

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Mark Z. wrote:

This one will get you 41 degree chamfer, but its kind of spendy:
http://www.leevalley.com/wood/page.aspx?c=1&pA012&cat=1,180,42240,42281&ap=1
Chris
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************************************************* If you try this on a drill press x moving the work, expect adversity. The work is essentially trapped between the table top and the cutter, an unsafe situation. If the work is clamped & the cutter big enough & centered, then you can plunge into the hole and safely chamfer. Typical chamfers for drills = 60, 82, 90, 100 & 120.
Router bits can be had at 45 & 30 and they will work in the drill press but the work cannot move. Your hole are big enough to safely rout if you could borrow a router.
An interesting question you have, why the 30 & 45? ********************** http://www.patwarner.com (Routing & drilling) **********************************************************************************
Specifically, I want to apply 30 degree and 45 degree chamfers to the

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A countersink will do the job nicely. See: http://www.mcmaster.com/ page 2420.
These are available in 60, 82, 90, 100,and 120 degree included angles. My preference is for the single flute. Run the bit slow, and set the depth on your drill press for the size of your chamfer. The single flute is not at all grabby and you can easily hold the wood by hand on the drill press table with out worry of clamps. These self center very well.
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Thanks to all of you who responded to my post and for all of your great suggestions. I believe my 'problem' is now solved thanks to you.
Regards,
Mark
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While I am not sure what angles and sizes are available, the first thing that came to my mind were cone shaped grinder stones like those used in die grinders. I believe that most sets come with a 30 degree and a 45 degree cone, but I don't know that the standard ones are big enough for your holes. If you can find large enough ones, they can be used in your drillpress like a large counter sink it seems to me. Haven't tried it and I am sure someone here will tell me the degree of stupidity the idea has, but I guess it is worth everything you paid me for it ;-)
Dave Hall
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Get one of these http://www.axminster.co.uk/product.asp?pf_id=22276&name=countersink&user_search=1&sfile=1&jump=12 One of my half-dozen most-used handtools.
Yes, they're expensive. Yes, you do need a Halls brand one at that price, and with that quality. OK, so you don't _need_ a Halls. But it's worth it and it does work and last far better than a cheapie.
I much prefer the 25mm diameter 90 one. I can't think why they've stopped selling it in this size?
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