How difficult is it to "build" a door?

This is a continuation of the "Sagging Garage Door" saga from 06-17-12.
What with the Big Heat, etc, it's no practical to repair the door.
Have been to Lowes, etc. Can't find suitable replacement.
How difficult is it to "build" a door?
I look at the rail and stile construction and think "A Mess Of 2x8's, Some Plywood (for panels) And A Table Saw". Of course, it's more difficult than that.
I don't need anything particular fancy, just secure and reliable/durable.
Anybody built one? Can anybody help with little details? Simple mortise and tenon? Which (exterior) glue? Fasteners???
Thx, P
"Law Without Equity Is No Law At All. It Is A Form Of Jungle Rule."
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On Wed, 11 Jul 2012 06:56:29 -0500, Puddin' Man

I built two 8' by 9'6" doors to enclose a dual carport a couple months ago. 3/8" ply and tubafores, barn door slider hardware. It took me a day and I had help hanging them. I was able to flip them myself as I primed and then painted them.

I used galv screws for the ply and galv joist plates and screws to connect the tubafores, which laid flat.
For a hinged, one-piece door, I'd have used spruce instead of doug fir tubafores, and ripped them into tubatwos to save weight. I might have gone to 1/4" ply, too, or 1/8 on both sides with a foam core center.
Just build 'em square and they're easy.
-- It is common sense to take a method and try it. If it fails, admit it frankly and try another. But above all, try something. -- Franklin D. Roosevelt
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On 7/11/2012 4:56 AM, Puddin' Man wrote:

Define suitable...
Lowes millwork department either stocks and can get damn near any type door made.
I recall your door as pretty "basic".
You can also very easily buy a door "slab" from most any lumber company or Lowes or Home Depot.
A proper door is made with proper materials and some really large shaper bits, although there are door making kits available for large routers.
My question would be, "why" ???
An exterior door can be bought quite cheaply.
You might even consider looking a "resale" stores like Goodwill and many others resales shops.
Our local store usually has "many" exterior doors.
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Your old door should come apart fairly easily, for you to clean up the joints and reglue everything.
If you don't have the tools for making appropriate tongue & groove joints, then your best alternative, IMO, is lap joints. Lap joints for that door would not look bad, especially if the door is to be painted, and may be easier to make.
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wrote:

Maybe I'm just too particular, but any joint which has failed will continue to fail repeatedly until it breaks. I refuse to attempt repairs on such joints. I replace the pieces or build new.
-- It is common sense to take a method and try it. If it fails, admit it frankly and try another. But above all, try something. -- Franklin D. Roosevelt
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On 7/11/2012 10:21 AM, Larry Jaques wrote:

...
OP posted link to pic in another newsgroup month or more ago--it's a basic panel door that has the typical failure of an old door.
I've done numerous similar over the years--unless one finds there's interior hidden rot, virtually always they can go back together as good as new and last another 20 yr or more...and OP doesn't have "the right stuff" to make replacement parts from scratch--he's said his extent is a small 1/4" router for shaping...
--

--

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dpb, wrote the following at or about 7/11/2012 1:11 PM: y joint which has failed will

Thinking back in my mind's eye to his first post, I'd have to agree. Knock it down properly, clean up the joints, reglue and clamp it square... Gild the lily if you wish by carefully boring a couple of holes ( 1/4" or 3/8" or so) through the stiles and into the rails, after the glue has dried, then score appropriate dowels longitudinally, glue them in the holes for a "poor man's mortise and tenon" just to add some suspenders to your belt.<g>
Easy enough to do and, as you say, if there's no rot, he should be good to go.
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On Wed, 11 Jul 2012 08:21:08 -0700, Larry Jaques

That doesn't necessarily follow. Maybe the original glue was inappropriate. Maybe not enough glue was used in the first place. Maybe the door wasn't clamped properly. ~ Always a number of reasons why a joint can fail.
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Thanks.
If the door and the opening both looked "funny" and I couldn't explain the effect of one on the other, I'd take Larry's position and seek to make both 'true'.
As it is, only the door seems to be a problem, so I concentrate on it.
Cheers, P

"Law Without Equity Is No Law At All. It Is A Form Of Jungle Rule."
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I had the same dilemma you're facing. I got a pair of Clopay metal doors at one of the big box stores. They're MUCH lighter, don't rot, and look as good today as when I put them up almost 20 years ago. No painting either. I'm sure there are other similar brands too, but that's what I ended up with. If you have an air wrench, they go together in a couple of hours.
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