How did you partition your basement for your shop?

I've just created an area in my basement that is my workshop. It takes up about 1/3 of my basement and I'm trying to decide what to do to minimize dust getting on everything else. The hardest and best thing to do would be put up sheetrock, but I dont really want to do this. Is there another option that I dont know about? How did you do it!? Thanks.
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You need to wall off the workshop from everything else (this includes HVAC ducts) AND put in an area filter. In my basement, I have 1/2" sheetrock on the outside of the ship studs, fiberglass batting to fill in the open area between the top of the walls and the joists. Put in a door (without sweep) and a rug as an entrance mat just inside the door to the shop. I also recently bought a Delta 3 speed area filter unit that filters out to 1 micron. I wish I had done this 15 years ago when I first moved in.
I did not have much dust leaking out of the shop due to the fiberglass batting, but the shop air was certainly filled with lots of dust. Have been using a face respirator (more than a paper dust mask) to help. After the Delta filter installation, I really don't need the respirator much anymore, but still use it because I am used to it and I know there are still lots of particles floating around just after using power tools and sanding. R
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Forgot to mention you can put up poly sheeting, but it will not work really well unless you use at least 3 layers and anchor them to the floor. Also, the air pressure within the shop can not be positive or it blows out of the poly regardless of the number of layers. R
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You say you don't want to sheetrock but that is really the way to go. It's cheap and goes up fast plus if painted white it helps a lot on the lighting factor. You should add blocking between the studs since we are always looking for more places to hang "stuff".

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On Wed, 31 Dec 2003 14:27:21 GMT, "Tom Kohlman"

Better than all sheetrock, IMHO - that's a joke, is 3/4 chipboard on the upper half. Hang 'em anywhere.
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An idea I have (for when I get a basement I can use) is to have 1 or 2 20" box fans creating negative pressure in the shop area. Furnace filters will prevent any dust from getting out.
I used a similar setup for spray painting model rockets and the like in the basement.....
Y
is to use On Wed, 31 Dec 2003 07:04:26 GMT, "Ron A"

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On 30 Dec 2003 22:38:42 -0800, snipped-for-privacy@r1150r.net (Subw00er) wrote:

I did something similar, bought 10' wide rolls of black plastic and stapled it up as "walls".
Works for me!
I sort of wish I'd used clear plastic now to let more light go between the rooms, but at the time I was partitioning off one particular room to let some kids have a birthday party there.
HTH
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On Wed, 31 Dec 2003 11:37:57 -0500, Mike Patterson

Don't let the birthday candles get too close to that sheeting. 8^(
Barry
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On 30 Dec 2003 22:38:42 -0800, snipped-for-privacy@r1150r.net (Subw00er) wrote:

I used sheetrock. It's easy, cheap, and fast. You don't need to mud the seams, prime and paint. But, I did, and added a large baseboard. I also installed a metal door (external, actually) to separate the "utility" room that contains the furnace, toilet, sink, and hot water tank.
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On 30 Dec 2003 22:38:42 -0800, snipped-for-privacy@r1150r.net (Subw00er) wrote:

Other methods, foam board, plastic sheeting, etc... may be easier, but they are flammable and not very durable.
Do it right, do it once. Frame it and install sheetrock, or better yet, a wood substrate that you can attach shelves and cabinets to.
Barry
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in message

Just to clarify, the foam board for insulation must be fire retardant, but codes still call for a sheetrock covering. There is a plastic sheeting that is also fire retardant, but it is meant as a vapor barrier, not a wall covering. Since the partitions are not structural, you can get away with 3/8" sheetrock that is easier to handle.It really is not hard to do and does not take all that much time, and it is cheaper that foam boards. Slap on some light colored paint and you have a shop to be proud of, not studs in a baggie. Ed snipped-for-privacy@snet.net http://pages.cthome.net/edhome
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