How dangerous are lathes?

Page 2 of 5  


nozzle at the lathe) to the above whole shop air filter

--
--------------------------------------------------------
Personal e-mail is the n7bsn but at amsat.org
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Toller wrote:

There are occasional injuries. I would worry about the thing catching my clothes and pulling me in.

I don't think so.

It's probably OK. Your mask doesn't have to deflect a bullet. It's going to both deflect and spread an impact out over a larger area, reducing its effect. It also keeps the crap from flying into your eyes all the time.

That would be the inside of your lungs otherwise. I wear eye and lung protection when there's stuff flying around to get me. If it's noisy I wear hearing protection as well. If I had known way back I was going to live so long, I'd have taken better care of myself back in the days when I thought I was bulletproof.
--
Mortimer Schnerd, RN
mschnerdatcarolina.rr.com
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
"Mortimer Schnerd, RN" <mschnerdatcarolina.rr.com> wrote in message

Pretty rare, injuries at a lathe. As far as life-threatening injuries, it's safer than walking across the street, certainly. Potential is there for the careless to ding themselves, but it's fairly easy to move the ON/OFF switch to where you don't have to lean into the disintegration zone to activate, reasonable to cut standing outside the zone if you push the tool handle. Makes you an unlikely impact point.
Eyes are very vulnerable and deserve protection. Face shields are often more trouble in distortion, distraction and discomfort than they're worth, especially when the above procedures are followed.
Cutting doesn't make dust, though sanding certainly does, so makes sense not to overload the body's natural defenses and wear something to cut down on access. Makes better sense to collect close to the point of generation. When that's done well, it's tough to work up a booger even if you don't wear a mask.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

True -- but they are not the only parts of your face that should be protected. Teeth, for example...

It does not appear that you have much, if any, experience in wearing face shields. Mine gives *no* problems with distortion or distraction -- and comfort is one of the reasons I prefer it to goggles. Vision is so clear, and the shield so lightweight and comfortable, that I often forget it's there, even to the point of banging my knuckles on it when I reach up to scratch my nose. In addition to being more comfortable than goggles, it also takes less time to don or doff -- which means I'm *much* more likely to use it, as there's really no excuse at all for not wearing it. The one downside I've experienced with a face shield is the importance of remembering to flip it up when I feel a sneeze coming on. :-b
--
Regards,
Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Wed, 29 Nov 2006 12:49:04 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@milmac.com (Doug Miller) wrote:

I've got one that is clear, lightweight and comfortable, but it builds up so much static electricity that is sucks every bit of dust it can hold migrates to it immediately, and make it hard to see. So, I hedge my bets a little, and use it when I have any suspicions that what I'm doing might come loose or break apart. I always wear it for doing anything with metal, especially after I looked at the stick I used to true the first disk I tried spinning- getting hit with that would be about as nice as trying to catch a circular saw blade tossed like a frisbee with your teeth. For things like roughing between centers, I don't get too worked up about it.
Of course, any helpful tips on eliminating that static charge would probably convince me to use the sucker at all times.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Prometheus wrote:

Polonium antistatic brush on ioniser?
http://www.amstat.com/solutions/staticmaster.html
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
badger.badger wrote:

RainX ?
--

Sometime they'll give a war and nobody will come.

Carl Sandburg (1878 - 1967), The People, Yes (1936)
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Prometheus wrote:

Try one of the static cling sprays designed for laundry care.
--
Jack Novak
Buffalo, NY - USA
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Wipe it down with a dryer sheet.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sun, 03 Dec 2006 02:38:29 -0600, Prometheus

There are all kinds of anti-static sprays you can buy, or you can just use an anti-static dryer sheet, although it probably won't last nearly as long as some of the products specifically intended for eliminating static cling.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
George wrote:

I don't live in fear of being killed using a lathe. OTOH, I've lived through two plane crashes and have a full understanding of the concept of lightning not always striking the other guy. That being said, there's no point in being stupid. You do what you can do but there is a point of diminishing return. I look for the most bang for the buck in concepts of safety. If I don't consider the return high enough, I'm not likely to bother.

I have a 1 micron dust collector piped into my big tools and also have an air cleaner mounted on the ceiling of my garage, uh, I mean workshop. On occasion I end up out in the driveway with something that produces clouds of dust or chips. If I do, I wear a respirator. I never need to wear one when I'm cutting boards at the jointer, band or table saw. The dust collector handles them well enough to suit me.
Irregardless of what I'm doing, if a cloud of dust exists, I wear the respirator. But that's the only time I wear it.
--
Mortimer Schnerd, RN
mschnerdatcarolina.rr.com
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Completely false. I remember an especially gruesome incident described either here, or on rcw, a number of years ago in which a long-haired turner failed to tie his hair back, and managed to get a pretty hefty lock of it wrapped around the spinning workpiece. I'll leave the results to your imagination, which likely isn't going to be any worse than the reality.

Never to me, but it has happened. Why not post in rcw (rec.crafts.woodturning) and see what folks there have to say. It seems to me that this is a problem mostly with bowl turning, where the workpiece is of a fairly large diameter and often being turned with the axis of the grain perpendicular to the lathe bed. If all you do is spindle turnings (e.g. pens, candlesticks, baseball bats, chair rungs, table legs, etc.) this is a fairly low risk.

Good enough -- and a lot better than simply goggles. I've said it before, and I'll say it again: there are other things on your face besides your eyes that are worth protecting. Teeth, for instance.

Then it would seem that you have more sense than the others. Without the mask, the stuff that's making it dirty would be making your lungs dirty instead.
--
Regards,
Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Wood moves. Sharp edges don't. So a lathe's safer than other tools.
HOWEVER: * You can still get sleeves/clothing caught in the rotating chuck. * Your fingers can get mashed by a chuck. * That wood can break loose and fly at your body!
I don't know if anyone was seriously injured on a Jet Mini.
--
Sending unsolicited commercial e-mail to this account incurs a fee of
$500 per message, and acknowledges the legality of this contract.
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
...

Never had that happen (yet)

Or the wood (yesterday)

--
--------------------------------------------------------
Personal e-mail is the n7bsn but at amsat.org
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Wed, 29 Nov 2006 05:34:18 -0800, Ralph E Lindberg wrote:

More of a girl/Hippie/suit problem--the first two get their hair caught, with the third it's his tie.

--
--John
to email, dial "usenet" and validate
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

... I wear a full-face shield that is also a mask. Mine is a Trend, but there is also the 3M and Triton. There are two kinds of woodworkers, those that have wood dust allergies, and those that will.
--
--------------------------------------------------------
Personal e-mail is the n7bsn but at amsat.org
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Hi--
I've been turning a lot over the last three years and have racked up a few injuries--none serious but enuf to make me take protecting myself seriously.
I wear a face shield. It gets dirty, picks up sap when I turn green wood, fogs in the winter, and when I sneeze you don't wanna know. But I turn a lot of wood right off the tree, and it does fling small split pieces off, as well as bark. Even at 450 rpm, they move. Several have caught me in the face (mask) making me glad I wore it.
I've had about 5 bowls come unglued from the face plate. They don't fly, they just sort of wander off of the lathe, mostly at the back.
I turned a plate from an old butcher block top. Got it all done, and spun it at 1200 rpm to melt the wax. There was one crack sound, and I stopped all to see what happened, didn't see anything. When I turned it back on, there was another, and the thing flew apart in three pieces. Two of the old glue joints let go. I caught one on the side of my arm, one in my gut, and had bruises for a week. I think my face shield would have resisted the impact.
I hit my fingers a lot with corners before I get the wood rough rounded. You can't see them. And really knocked my knuckles on "natural edges" spinning fast.
Finally, I've been turning some larger bowls--start with a chunk of trunk about 13" in diameter and maybe 15" deep. Have to balance it carefully before, but even thin it is off balance. I lag screw it to the face plate, make several checks of clearance and balance before I hit the switch, but when that wood (weighs in at about 30-35#) starts spinning and shaking its pretty impressive. I stand next to the off switch, out of the line of fire.
So, take care, you can get hurt, but sensible precautions and knowing which part of the air belongs to the turning and which part your hands can go into help.
Have a grand time turning--join a turning club and find some of the resources on the internet. They are great. http://www.woodturner.org /
OldGuy

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I agree, the guy is a dickhead! I have been using metal and wood lathes since I was 15, (now 55) and I can remember one poor chap at work getting a piece of wood that broke off stuck in his forehead! very nasty.. You should all ways work with great respect for machinery, accidents can and will happen if you don't. Eddie.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I will give my standard rant concerning face sheilds.
When I was setting up a small metal shop, I asked a friend of mine who worked in steel mills where I should go to buy some basic safety equipment. He referred to to an industrial safety suppplier. Most cities of any size have them.
There is an amazing assortment of safety equipment at them and most of is is much better quality than what you get at the borg. I ended up getting a red hard hat with a face shield attachment. The face shield was a sheet of flexible polycarbonate with holes in the edge that matched the frame on the helmet. It quickly changed out from the old one to the new one.
Polycarbonate, although tough, does have a tendancy to get scratched up. So replacement shieds are a must. One of the reasons why I bought this setup was because my steel mill friend had some tall tales of how they saved somebody's face/eyes. i have had a number of solid objects impact the face shield when grinding down metal parts.
One time it hit hard enough to knock me over onto my ass from a forward bending position. I have also taken hits on the hard hat as well. If I am going to do anything in the shop, metal or woodwork, that has a potential to do me bodily harm, I armor up. Hard hat, face shield, ear protection, safety glasses and dust mask are a minimum. I often wear a leather apron as well with a break away strings on it in case it gets caught in anything.
Call me a safety freak. But I grew up around all kinds of industrial accident victims. I vowed from an early age that nothing like this was going to happen to me. And I have been a bonafide safety freak ever since.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I don't know what is done in shops or at homes alone, but I have been hit bit a flying cutting tool that sliced through my arm, and flew across the room. I was cutting with the ~16" gouge facing away from me at the time.
-
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.