How can I determine if magnetic starter (switch) on my Grizzly 1023 is damaged?

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On Thu, 18 Sep 2008 10:26:00 -0500, "David G. Nagel"

So who was the original poster? :-) I hope he is still safe and not victim of someone's questionable wiring job.
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On Sep 18, 5:44 pm, Jim Behning

Still here. I've had some computer issues for a couple of weeks. Scott nailed it. Electrician installed double pole breaker incorrectly. My panel allows a double pole breaker to fit in slots powered by same phase lead. I moved the breaker down one slot and it's good now. Saw is running. Electrician's name removed from Rolodex. :-)
Thanks for all the good input!
Jeff
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Tom
I am not sure what the jurisdictions and/or the NEC require for the unused white wire. I see them cut back, just left hanging, taped back and just pushed out of the way. I usually tape them back or cut them back. Sometimes I find a wirenut on the white wire.
It is always nice to find a white wire to use for a neutral for a low current use. Much more than a few amps and I run another hot from another circuit breaker.
Just a note here: 220 volt appliances now require a separate neutral, white wire, if there are any 110 volt loads. Such as receptacles etc.
Bob AZ
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Thanks for the note Dan. I will verify. Is there any plausible reason that my supply coming off the double pole breaker would not be 180 degrees out of phase?
Jeff
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JJ wrote:
...

Only if used two single pole breakers that picked up the same side of the buss bar or the double isn't correct for the panel and did the same.
I guess the other outlandish possibility would be that both sides of the supply panel are being fed by one side so there's no 240V available from the panel at all but that would really be bizarre installation...
--
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dpb wrote:

I may not be all that bizarre if it's an old house with only a 120V service.
--
Jack Novak
Buffalo, NY - USA
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JJ wrote:

Distribution panels are setup so that every other breaker position is connected together. The remaining positions are connected to the opposite phase. As a result, double pole breakers have 240 volts between their hot wires. I would be very surprised if there was something different at the breaker. However there may be a problem between the breaker and your switch. For instance, the two hot wires from your switch may not connect to the double pole breaker like you think. A couple of measurements with a voltmeter should give you more information.
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Dan & Jeff
Maybe the "double breaaker" is in fact one of theose breaker bodies that has two breakers in one housing so each breaker is on he same leg!!
Bob AZ
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wrote:

If someone who wasn't watching or didn't know what they were doing connected the wrong wires to the breakers, you could have that condition. If the circuit is wired with NMC, you'll see the white wire from one cable going to one breaker and the black wire going to a different breaker. If you can't tell which wires feed the circuit, trip the breaker and make sure both hot wires at the saw show zero voltage to ground. If not, then one of the wires is connected to a different breaker. If that's the case, keep tripping breakers until both wires are cold. Then, swap the affected wires to correct the problem. That's assuming the wire gauges that are swapped are correct for the breaker they finally land on.
If that's not the case, it could be, as suggested elsewhere, the breaker in use is not the correct type for the distribution box. I've also heard tales of boxes in which some positions aren't usable for double pole breakers because adjacent positions don't span both legs. If that's the case, you'll see both wires go cold when you trip the breaker. To correct that, you'll need to rearrange the vertical position of the breakers so the double pole breaker is in the correct position. I don't know if such boxes exist or not. In my limited experience, I've not encountered one, or haven't noticed if I did.
One other thought is that if the circuit was "self-installed" and a half height breaker (two breakers in a single position) was used, or if someone has been monkeying around with the wiring and both wires ended up landing on one of those, you'd see the results you're seeing. I assume that's not the case since you'd surely have noticed that by now.
Tom Veatch Wichita, KS USA
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Jeff
So how much voltage do you see? From the electrical diagram and the specifications you have a 220 motor, either single phase or 3 phase. A three phase saw would have a 4 pin or blade connector. A quick and easy check will be the number of wires in the motor terminal box. Also the cable connector, the power connector will be at least three connectors or blades.
Don't get hung up on the starter/relay being bad. Find out what is bad and then worry about that part. Do you really have 220 or thereabouts on the input? The cable plug should not be the conventional 110 volt, 3 blade with a ground type. If it is get this right first. Not later when your estate is trying to sell the saw.
FWIW the book and electrical diagram is way better than most. You are fortunate.
Bob AZ
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Since you said "---detect current at the switch---", I will assume that you are somewhat light on "electricity". Detecting CURRENT would mean that electricity is flowing in the circuit and so something would be turning, humming or smoking. Since this is not the case, you probably meant that you detected VOLTAGE somewhere along the line. So, to help you get started troubleshooting this saw I recommend you visit these sites:
JJ wrote:

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Sorry, I pushed the wrong button!
Since you said "---detect current at the switch---", I will assume that you are somewhat light on "electricity". Detecting CURRENT would mean that electricity is flowing in the circuit and so something would be turning, humming or smoking. Since this is not the case, you probably meant that you detected VOLTAGE somewhere along the line. So, to help you get started troubleshooting this saw I recommend you visit these sites:
http://www.wikihow.com/Use-an-Ohmmeter You will use an ohmmeter with the power disconnected. This is good for personal safety.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Magnetic_starter You might try googling "Magnetic starter wiring" to find out more about how they work.
Pete Stanaitis ---------------------------------
JJ wrote:

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Yes, voltage. Sorry, typing too fast. Thinking too little.
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wrote:

snip
Hi Jeff,
I have a clone of this machine here is a link to a question my saw wont start http://www.onlinetoolreviews.com/articles/TSC-10HB.htm#Q2
hope it's same as your switch.
Rgds, Phil.
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