How can I determine if magnetic starter (switch) on my Grizzly 1023 is damaged?

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Scott Lurndal wrote:

I live in a home built in 1991 that has a GE box that will allow it.
This is why I asked the OP ~ 40 messages ago if he can read 220-240vac hot to hot. I did it myself.
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Jeff
Possible code violation unless there is a dedicated ground system in use. Rarely seen.
Also there is a possibility that your juristiction may require the cable to be 10-3 with ground. This would give you a black, red and white wire in the cable along with the ground.
Bob AZ
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Bob AZ wrote:

How do all those 240v air conditioners I see locally work with a 3 prong plug? These are brand new installations.
I seriously doubt they are all violations.
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wrote:

I think the most prevalent case is to simply use the bare ground wire in the #/2 cable for the ground. Almost universally seen.
Tom Veatch Wichita, KS USA
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Tom Veatch wrote:

That's how I understand it. Two hots and a ground, no neutral.
Dryers and stoves need the neutral, because they also need 120v from the same circuit.
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B A R R Y wrote:

Very common, provided the connectors are a type 250 Volt NEMA 6-XX (where XX = the rated amperage) connector to prevent a 120V appliance from being plugged into the 220V outlet (and vise versa).
http://www.nooutage.com/nema_configurations.htm
--
Jack Novak
Buffalo, NY - USA
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"B A R R Y" wrote:

It's a nomenclature problem.
"10/2" is shorthand for 10/2/WG.
IOW: L1(Black), L2 (Red), and bare earth ground in a common sheath.
"10/3" same as above except add N(White).
Lew
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On Thu, 18 Sep 2008 00:16:36 GMT, "Lew Hodgett"
...

Lew, are you sure you didn't misspeak there? As I recall, all the 2+G NMC I've seen was Black/White/Bare. I've not seen the Red wire except in 3+G cables. Maybe there's a different NMC color combination cable for use in 240v circuits?
Don't think you'd want to choose a Black/Red/Bare for a 120v circuit. 'Course that's probably no worse than using Black/White/Bare for 240v.
Tom Veatch Wichita, KS USA
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Tom Veatch wrote:

I believe you are correct Tom. The white wire has to be either wrapped with black electrical tape or marked with a permanent black marker to indicate it is used as a hot lead.
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Jack Novak
Buffalo, NY - USA
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<Tom Veatch> wrote:

I stand corrected.
Need to remember to engage brain before hitting <send> key.
Lew
BTW, I NEVER trust color codes. Always "ring" the circuit as I go.
Lew
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Lew Hodgett wrote:

Maybe...
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Barry
A 240 volt installation requires only 2 wires and ground. Two hots and a ground if you will.
I don't know of any cable of the type mentioned by the OP that are just one black and one red wire with a ground. So the closest cable available that I am familiar with that meets the NEC has a red and black and a white wire together with a ground wire.
If a two wire cable with ground is used it is usually with a black and a white wire with a ground. In this case the white wire must be ID'ed, usually with red tape. There are also requirements for how the tape is used for identification.
Take care Bob AZ
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Bob AZ wrote:

Right! Known as 10/2 where I am.
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wrote:

What do those jurisdictions require be done with the white wire which won't bet connected to anything on either end?
Tom Veatch Wichita, KS USA
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Tom Veatch wrote:

The black wire is attached to the first breaker, the red wire is connected to the second breaker, the white wire is connected to the ground strip mounted around the breakers. The other end of the cable is connected in a similar fashion. The black is attached to one blade socked, the red is connected to the other blade socket, the white is attached to the ground socket. The green wire is attached to the case at each end of the cable.
Dave N
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The black wire is attached to the first breaker, the red wire is

Dave N
A white wire can not be used for ground unless marked with green. Tape or permanent marker. (And some inspectors will not accept this) Both the case and the appliance must be connected to ground.
Also the grounding appliance wire(s) must be pigtailed in this case so that the appliance can be changed without disturbing the case ground. The ground wire has two uses in this instance.
The Black and the Red wires don't have to be pigtailed since they have a single use in this instance.
And also again different jurisdictions have different interpretations for these things. Prior work is also has some part of this.
Bob AZ
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On Wed, 17 Sep 2008 22:52:43 -0500, "David G. Nagel"

Well, I suppose local jurisdictions do differ. I'm just glad that the local jurisdiction here doesn't require the unnecessary expense of two parallel equipment grounding conductors. In this locale, 240v circuits are wired with /2 cables where the 2 conductors are the hot wires (white marked at the connections with black tape or heat shrink) and the bare (never seen green in NMC) is used as the EGC.
In fact, I was under the opinion, apparently mistaken, that the NEC held the white color code somewhat sacrosanct and required it be re colored if used for anything other than the neutral conductor.
The only time /3 cables are used is for circuits required to supply dual voltage (black and red hot, white neutral) or circuits that include 3-way switches.
Tom Veatch Wichita, KS USA
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On Wed, 17 Sep 2008 22:52:43 -0500, "David G. Nagel"

I do not know where you live but when you say the black attaches to one circuit breaker and the red attaches to another breaker. That concerns me. You "should" have one 30 amp dual pole breaker. Yes some breakers have the ability to "bond" with a strap or something that causes both breakers to disconnect if there is a fault. Are these breakers "bonded" with a strap between the reset levers? If it is not then you could have deadly possibility of thinking the circuit is dead but still have 120 happening. I did once have a 3 pole breaker that when it popped it did not release all three legs. That was exciting. Note in the tutorial at the end that they show a double pole breaker. This breaker is one unit that connects to both hot buss bars and the trip levers are connected so if one leg has a fault it disconnects both legs. See page 4 where you see the hot busses above the breaker zigging and zagging. If you go to you local Home Depot, Lowes or good hardware store they have breakers you can touch and a panel box. You should be able to see the two separate hot busses there. If you pop out the double pole breaker you should see two separate and distinct buss bars underneath it. Once again your licensed electrician should be doing this stuff but looking at the home center is no risk of life.
Was your electrician licensed?
You should not be dealing with this anymore. Your licensed electrician should come back and show you with his multimeter that all is correct on his wiring job. I lost track of the thread so I am assuming that a professional did the wiring but stating you have two breakers makes me suspicious. I am not an electrician and I do not have the latest annotated NEC book to read up on breaker requirements.
I have had licensed electricians do work improperly. They had to come out and redo their work. I had an air compressor with a dryer that they ran too small of wire. The conduit was pretty darn hot. They pulled bigger wire which helped. I suspect in retrospect that the conduit may have been too small but the compressor ran the few months it needed too without issue.
http://homerepair.about.com/od/electricalrepair/ss/240v_breaker.htm
When I work on my stuff I walk outside the house and I turn of the 200 amp disconnect. When my licensed electrician reaches in to my box to do live work I tell him to wait a minute while I walk outside to disconnect. Even though he does commercial work every day while hot, I don't want fried electrician in my house. A guy blew himself up a few months ago doing live work in our office complex. His helper got a trip to the hospital. Power was out for a few days after that mess. Yes electricity can blow you up. Maybe not literally but with enough amps it can be pretty messy and deadly.
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Jim Behning wrote:

Maybe I should have been a little more specific about the breaker. I was talking about a dual pole breaker. I absolutely agree that two seperate breakers should never be used on a single circuit. My colors may be backwards also. The point I was trying to make was to try to answer the OP's question about the white wire. Also the GREEN safety wire should ALWAYS be connected to the frames. A young man was killed where I used to work due to the motor on a large fan shorting to ground. The fan was setting on a wood pallet and the wiring was not safety grounded. When he reached to restart the fan he became the ground. The electriction stated to me that he always cut the green wire off. This was long before OSHA existed.
I agree with everything you wrote.
Dave Nagel
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