How best to cut a piece of melamine shelving so it doesn't chip?

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"Steve Turner" wrote

Hmm. Interesting. *I* think it's just as easy to make another insert.
Max (hate that epoxy smell) ;-)
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On 3/23/2012 7:02 PM, Max wrote:

Seriously? Out of phenolic? Rough-cut to general size on the bandsaw, milled to actual size with a flush-cut bit on the router table, drilled and tapped for leveling screws, drilled for a finger removal hole, a small hole drilled in just the right spot on the back edge to insert a roll pin to prevent the blade from lifting the insert out of the slot, and perhaps extra drilling or cutting for a splitter or riving knife? Mine also requires extra milling on the underside so the insert clears the blade stabilizer and/or arbor nut. All that so you can avoid the smell of epoxy? Whatever...
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On 3/23/12 7:18 PM, Steve Turner wrote:

Jeez Steve, of course all that is easier than squirting out some epoxy, mixing it up, pushing it down into the slot, going out on the back deck with a good beer and waiting all those minutes for the epoxy to cure. sheesh. What were you thinking?
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"Steve Turner" wrote in message
On 3/23/2012 7:02 PM, Max wrote:

Thanks........
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On Fri, 23 Mar 2012 19:18:14 -0500, Steve Turner

Well, I like your tip. It's fast, easy and convenient.
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On 3/24/2012 2:16 AM, Dave wrote:

Thanks. "Fast" of course depends on what kind of epoxy you use. In my experience, the strongest epoxies tend not to be those that cure quickly, particularly those of the "5 minute" variety, so I would normally expect this to be an overnight operation. I recently bought some of this stuff:
http://www.tapplastics.com/shop/product.php?pid (&PHPSESSID 1203240726171342237206
and it cures about as quickly as I could expect without sacrificing any strength or adhesive qualities. It also has relatively low viscosity, which I prefer for good penetrative characteristics on materials like wood. It's pretty good stuff, and it would work very well for the phenolic insert application.
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Max wrote:

What smell? My epoxy is pretty odorless. Polyester maybe? That's what I use (in the form of Bondo).
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On 3/24/2012 6:39 AM, dadiOH wrote:

Yeah, I was thinking the same thing. I have about five different kinds of epoxy around here, and only one (Bondo marine epoxy, which you can't buy any more) has any significant odor (the hardener smells strongly of ammonia), but even that's not noticeable unless you stick your nose right in it.
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"dadiOH" wrote:

------------------------------------- Bingo.
Epoxy is oderless but a total waste of good epoxy for this application.
1/4" tempered hardboard and some double backed tape works for me.
Lew
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On 03/26/2012 01:51 PM, Lew Hodgett wrote:

A waste of good epoxy? To renew a zero-clearance insert? It takes all of about 1/2 ounce of epoxy to get the job done. Sometimes I have more than that left over from most of the woodworking tasks I use epoxy for.
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On 3/26/12 3:50 PM, Steve Turner wrote:

Plus, you're doing your part to help out the epoxy industry during these trying times.
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wrote:

Steve's idea was great. I'm gonna send it in to XYZ magazine and get the big bucks!

So do it on the back porch, fer pity's sake!
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On 3/24/2012 8:21 AM, Larry Jaques wrote:

Go for it. You can buy me a beer next time you're in Austin. :-)
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I want to thank all of you for helping me. I think the advice of raising the blade just high enough was the ticket. Well, that and telling me what side to place face up and face down.
I ended up using masking tape put on really tight and there was barely any chipping. It was amazing. I was so scared to cut the pieces but it turned out great.
Thanks.
wrote:

Like he said. In my experience, a router is the only way to get a perfect edge on melamine without a scoring blade on your saw. Even the melamine blades have not given me perfect cuts. YMMV
Luigi
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masking tape will help.
"Better" is to make a 'sandwich' with a couple of pieces of sacrificial stock surrounding the shelf 'middle'. use _double-sided_ masking tape to hold the pieces of the sandwich together.

Generally you want the leading edge of the blade cutting from 'outside' the board, into the melamine, and thence into the shelf substrate.
This means that the melamine would be the side "away" from the saw table, or away from the baseplate.
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Cut half the thickness on table saw, and then flip it on the other side
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snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote in

I've used tape to reduce the chipping and it does help. A sharp blade helps quite a bit too.
The only problem with making two cuts is the final edge isn't likely to be smooth. If you're edge banding, it might be a problem. You may want to make the second cut full-depth to try to eliminate this.
Puckdropper
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Puckdropper <puckdropper(at)yahoo(dot)com> wrote in

I suspect alex is answering one of these mysterious posts from decades ago, since he didn't quote the original question.
However, another possible solution is cutting close with the saw, then trimming to final size with a router.
John
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Yeah, I caught that and posted anyway. I'm always happy to see woodworking technique discussed here, even if the original post is old enough to drive.
Puckdropper
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