How bad was my mistake?

Building up a 4X4X30" block of hard maple using 3/4" thick boards. Never used Gorilla glue before but bought some today and glued on a board and heavily clamped it, but did not moisten the board as per directions. (didn't read directions). How much of a problem will this be? A horribly weak joint or a very strong joint but not as good as it might be if done correctly?Any comments appreciated. Allan
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What will the blank be used for? GG is notoriously weak when it comes to shock impacts. I would guess (although I don't know) that it would be more so if you failed to moisten. Also, how dry was the wood when you glued it?
Depending on what the final product is, you may get away with this one. ;-)
jc
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I've used Gorilla Glue both with, and without, moistening the boards first. It doesn't seem to make a noticeable difference: either way, the glue bond is going to be stronger than the wood anyway. Unless you live in the desert, there's enough moisture in the wood to activate the glue regardless.
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On Tue, 24 Apr 2007 22:08:18 -0400, Allan Matthews

Block is to be sawn lengthwise on an angle to make two pegboards for a hammered dulcimer. Glue that was squeezed out was foaming and so I believe it was activated but am not that familiar with GG..My choices are to use it or saw it apart and start over.
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Allan Matthews wrote: | On Tue, 24 Apr 2007 22:08:18 -0400, Allan Matthews
| || Building up a 4X4X30" block of hard maple using 3/4" thick boards. || Never used Gorilla glue before but bought some today and glued on a || board and heavily clamped it, but did not moisten the board as per || directions. (didn't read directions). How much of a problem will || this be? A horribly weak joint or a very strong joint but not as || good as it might be if done correctly?Any comments appreciated. || Allan | | Block is to be sawn lengthwise on an angle to make two pegboards | for a hammered dulcimer. Glue that was squeezed out was foaming | and so I believe it was activated but am not that familiar with | GG..My choices are to use it or saw it apart and start over.
I'd suggest getting input from some other instrument-makers regarding the acoustical properties of GG. I suspect (but don't know for sure) that this may be a more important issue than the strength of the joint...
-- Morris Dovey DeSoto Solar DeSoto, Iowa USA http://www.iedu.com/DeSoto /
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wrote:

Some use GG and some use yellow carpenters glue. The pegboard doesn't enter into the acoustical properties of the instrument. the strings pass over nuts and bridges.
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I'd say use it - there should be enough moisture in the air and the wood to cure just fine. I think the foaming confirms that. Some people on this group really bash GG (and other polyurethane glues) but I've used them in a variety of projects and haven't had any problems. I usually do moisten the surfaces, unless the wood or ambient air are already holding a lot of moisture. I like the long open time, but unless I need the time, I usually "stick with" TBII or III, as they're cheaper and at least as strong. Good luck, Andy
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Do you have any scrap left over? If so, glue some up using the exact same circumstances as the original and let it cure. Then try to take it apart with a hammer, chisel, etc. If the wood fails before the glue, you're good to go with the original piece.
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On Tue, 24 Apr 2007 22:08:18 -0400, Allan Matthews

If it cures, it cures properly. The need to moisten the board is only if you're somewhere especially dry.
OTOH, the stuff's terrible (although not the worst PU glue around). If I had timber to spare and an accurate bandsaw, I might well saw it apart and re-glue it with hide glue.
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On Wed, 25 Apr 2007 21:55:53 +0100, Andy Dingley

I wouldn't say terrible. I've built several projects using it. All are still together. I built an outdoor planter/bench where I used GG on half the joints, Titebond on the other half. There's no difference. Both are water resistant enough. Nothing's falling apart. That project has been outside 5 years in SE Wisconsin.
I like GG in some instances for it's long open time. Well, longer than yellow glue. Yes, foamed material has no strength. But GG in a properly cut joint is plenty strong enough.
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Let it dry while clamped for a fair bit longer than the recommended time. Gorilla glue will utilize the moisture from the air to cure. It'll be okay. What are "directions"? Tom
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