Houston under water.

Page 1 of 3  
You guys in Houston, are you ok?
16-20 inches of rain.. Holly crap.
--
Jeff

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 4/18/2016 2:35 PM, woodchucker wrote:

https://goo.gl/photos/QPKtBgm7KqdWaw2HA
--
eWoodShop: www.eWoodShop.com
Wood Shop: www.e-WoodShop.net
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I hope you put another coat of BoeShield on your tools before the rain started!
Puckdropper
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Puckdropper <puckdropper(at)yahoo(dot)com> wrote:

Boeshield does not even work on our humidity. :-(
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload


What are you using? I thought Boeshield was what worked in Texas.
Puckdropper
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Puckdropper <puckdropper(at)yahoo(dot)com> wrote:

For many years I used Topcote made by Empire. They sold to Bostick and while not as good as the original I use that today. 16 years ago I tried Boeshield on a new saw and the next morning had rust and I had not yet used the saw.
Fwiw the original Topcote was made to made the TS surface slick and it did a very good job at that. I noticed that as an additional benefit that it prevented rust. The current version is more focused on preventing rust and IIRC not making the top slick.
I found that to make Boeshield work I had to put on enough that it had to be wiped off before use, every day. Topcoat is specifically made for tool surfaces and a good heavy coating can last for months before rust begins to show. YMMV.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload


Well, that's worth knowing. Humidity's even worse here at the pointy end of Fla, I'll have to give Topcote a try.
John
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

A good rule of thumb that I use is to put o 2-3 coats initially. Let it glaze over between coats so that you can see your coverage. After that I mostly rely on the feel of the wood sliding on the surface to signal the need for another coat. I never get rust from humidity but salty sweat will get you so I try to not touch the surface unless my hands are dry. If I am leaning on the top, like when changing blades I make sure to dry where my sweaty arms or hands touched.
Keep in mind that my TS is not a show piece so a perfect looking top is not my goal so much as keeping rust to an absolute minimum. If I do get a spot of rust I buff the spot with steel wool and spot treat with Topcote. Nothing is fool proof but Topcote is my preferred preventative. It does not affect wood finishes.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 04/18/2016 11:07 PM, Leon wrote:

FWW did a comparison of something like 20 various products some years ago. I don't recall who "won", but I do remember noting that Boeshield didn't rate all that well; somewhere down in the middle of the pack.
Actually, none of them were all that great it seems I remember thinking was the real conclusion one could draw. Makes living where it doesn't rain all that much somewhat more palatable for other things (besides the farming one, anyway)... :)
We finally managed to get another 0.45" today after almost all day drizzling/sprinkling. Just west of town only 6 or 7 mi west fella' reported at the coffee shop this morning they'd already had another inch by 10AM...on top of the 2" or so from Saturday/Sunday. Just can't get a break over here, though, it seems...
Ah, well, since had had nothing measurable since first week of February, will accept any and manage to get by since there's not much choice otherwise.
The guys w/ 9" and more aren't that much better off.
--


Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 18 Apr 2016 22:52:02 GMT, Puckdropper <puckdropper(at)yahoo(dot)com> wrote:

Boeshield doesn't work under water. ;-)
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Monday, April 18, 2016 at 5:52:10 PM UTC-5, snipped-for-privacy@googlegroups.com wrote:

He puts it on his pirogue, instead.
Sonny
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 4/19/2016 7:38 AM, Sonny wrote:

Hell ... it got me to the liquor store yesterday. ;)
--
eWoodShop: www.eWoodShop.com
Wood Shop: www.e-WoodShop.net
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload


I read that as "perogie" first time past, and thought "ick".
John
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 4/19/2016 2:25 PM, John McCoy wrote:

--
Jeff

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Tue, 19 Apr 2016 18:25:29 -0000 (UTC), John McCoy

I'm glad I'm not alone. ;-)
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 4/18/2016 6:08 PM, Swingman wrote:

Glad to see you still can joke about it. Then you must not have had to bail out.
--
Jeff

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Saw a guy drive into the water and started to get out the passenger door. He got out and started to swim to the side of the freeway. News man helped him the last bit. His car by then just went under - it was on the ground, the water just rose 3' while he was moving away!
Houston is rather flat and has trouble in ridding itself of water. If rivers bring more than can easily flow to the ocean, it stacks up.
As a retired and 50 year old Geo my maps show Quaternary soil there. That means the fifty miles or less from the coast can come and go at the will of time. It isn't permanent soil yet. Mostly marsh and waterways. Building used fill and piles to make inland islands and created a stable city. Floods are just something that happen. Some are 200 or 400 year flood. To me it is still water on my feet.
When living in the Austin area we had 2, 4, 6 and 8oo year floods in one year. 17" in my backyard one night. This was in the early 80's.
If a low or a pair of lows (like now) get pulling water off the gulf the water goes somewhere. The worst is when you have rivers that are being rained upon along their entire length of several hundred miles. That really dives water down to the coast. Dams might have been dumping early to keep control. Most of our dams are full.
Martin
On 4/18/2016 10:01 PM, woodchucker wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Actually he was on a street under pass leading to a freeway entrance intersection. He jumped out of his floating car, after opening the passenger door the car sank. The water did not rise that fast.

We have about 8-9 bayous, the name native Indians called rivers. This would happen anywhere that receives 10-15 inches of rain in a 5-10 hour period. In 2001 during TS Allson we received 35 inches in one weekend.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Monday, April 18, 2016 at 11:35:13 PM UTC-5, Martin Eastburn wrote:

They don't got no topsoil, anymore, hardly. It's mostly concrete.
Many southern cities have, similarly, paved over large areas, hence less an d less water-absorbing green areas, contributing to surface run-off, floodi ng, this way.
Our genius city engineers don't know how to properly concrete a coulee/drai nage ditch, either. The fairly-recently-concreted coulee, next to my shop , has the slope pointing down, by 1 foot over 200 yards length, as it goes upstream.... which is suppose to drain the Ambassador Caffree Parkway (5 la ne), but they screwed up the parkway leveling/slope, as well, so everything , there, is under water (road closure), often, even with a moderate rain.
The above is not our only example of poor city-drainage engineering.
Sonny
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Swingman wrote:

Not to mention the spending habits of those in power.
A handful of years ago the city fathers here built a civic center. It is quite nice. It was also very expensive; I've heard figures ranging from 28 to 41 million. Now, the town was less tham 20,000 at the time so that works out to be somewhere between $1,400 to $2,000+ per person. EVERY person.
Worse yet, they now have a budget "shortfall" so they levied a fire fee of $150+ per year on all property owners (except for churches, of course).
Oh yeah...they built a new city hall too. The old one was too small to accommodate the ever increasing size of local government.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.