Homebuilt Draw Pull(Drawer Pull?)

I'm not quite sure what the acceptable term for those things you attach to the front of drawers. Norm clearly calls them 'draw pulls' and I've seen that term in print. Probably, it's like the try-square/trisquare semantic brouhaha we've had here for a bit. Anyhow, for over a week or so I've been blathering on about the desk I'm building and am at the draw pull making stage. I'm thinking about a sort of flower(dahlia) motif for a few of the drawers.. I've cut the pull from a scrap computer case sheet metal and wound the handle portion with some 14 gauge copper wire I got from a dumpster. I brazed on some thin wall copper tubing on the back side and attached the thing to my practice drawer. Also, I slathered on some braze on the wound on wire. I need to incise the leaf veins, somehow. I tried outlining with my flex-shaft and a fine bit, but you can see it sucks big. Next try is some sort of repousse with a cold chisel, hammer and anvil. The picture shows my prototype on my practice drawer.
http://home.mchsi.com/~lhote5/drawpull1big.jpg
Larry
--
Lawrence L'Hote
http://home.mchsi.com/~larrylhote
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Larry,
You may want to try etching the design onto the metal. Radio Shack used to sell the acid and the resist for etching copper boards. Don't know if it will etch the steel but there are acids out there that will.
Nice handle by the way,
Bob S.

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BobS wrote...

Ferric Chloride.

It does, but very poorly. Nitric acid or a nitric-hydrochloric solution is more often used for steel (probably the main metal in that computer case). If he really wants to etch it, electrochemical etching is an even better option.
However, for the look he is creating, stamping or cold-forging is the way to go.
Cheers!
Jim
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Very nice handle. Your slather is very bark-like. If you have a scroll saw you might try piercing and sawing with a fine blade. If not you might want to get one. How do you cut the leafs out now? Jack

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Thanks for the compliments. I first cut the sheet metal from whatever I've got with a saber saw(with metal cutting blade) and then do the fine work with a jewelers saw using a 1/0 blade. Takes a little time but is very therapeutic. It would be no problem cutting the veins with the jewelers saw but I don't prefer that look. I'm going to cut out a few more today and try the cold chisel and anvil. Oh, I have a RBI Hawk and I tried cutting sheet metal with it early on but the process is too wild and crazy and I gave that up QUICK. Larry
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Lawrence L'Hote wrote...

That's the way to go, although you might consider using a hardwood block under it for the veining instead of the anvil. You can always go back to the anvil to flatten if necessary when you have the relief you want.
I love the design, and your execution so far is excellent. You are an artist.
Jim
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You're very kind with your remarks. Thanks. I plan to put a 'cushion' of thick leather between the metal and the anvil. Also, I have one of those leather, lead shot filled pillows the sheet metal formers use and will give it a try if the leather-on-anvil doesn't do what I want.. I have used this metal forming equipment on some other projects of varying worth. If you are interested see @ http://home.mchsi.com/~llhote /
Larry
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Lawrence L'Hote wrote:
snip

Might try a center punch and dimple the texture. If you're going to get into this thing look for a Foredom "reciprocating handpiece". Comes with changeable tips and lets you control both the throw and the impact strength. They have two stock tips - one a flat round end and the other a hardened point. If you can thread the end of a diamond wafer cutter you can do some really interesting textures - the diamond on the end of the wafer cutter is pyramid shaped. Depending on the angle, you can do little squarish dimples. or if held at a shallower angle and on one of the corners, nice shiny "Vs" Either way, the resulting texture will be shiny.
If you want to "pop" the texture apply some lier of sulfur - will turn most metals black or dark brown. Buff the black off the high spots and leave the low spots dark brown/black.
If you want a quick and dirty repose look use copper sheet with copper wire under it and pound on an anvil with a leather mallet. If you have a rolling mill it's really quick to do.
If you go with chasing or repose (sp?) you might want to get a chasing hammer - big round head and long thin handle with a bulge at the end where you hold it. The large round head means you can keep your eye on the working end of the tool you're hitting and not have to worry about missing the tool with the hammer. Great little hammer.
charlie b
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Thanks Charlie for the suggestions. I got a bunch of punches and chisels at a local pawn shop for just that purpose but haven't really got to experiment on the sheet iron. I have the Foredom H and I'm not sure it will take the reciprocating handpieces. Anyhow, I just need to get this project over and done because it's due in less than 4 weeks.

I really like that look you describe. I've got jugs of patina concoctions that I use for some of the copper stuff I do.

I have one of those and chasing tools, pitch pot and etc. I worked with the copper then got interested in something else then something else... I'll get back around to copper stuff as soon as I finish up some of my furniture rehab projects.
Larry
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charlie b wrote:

For texturing try these at leevalley.com 50K53.01 Texturing punches. Says they're for wood plastic and leather but should last a while on the steel you're working with. Joe
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