Home plans and Material lists

My wife and I are looking to build a house on a tight budget. There are plenty of web sites that offer plans, but I want to see a material list so we can price out the house and see if its affordable for us. ALl the sites I've seen want you to buy the plans to get a material list of some of the sites offer material list for $75. We would go broke buying all the plans we like to get a material list.
Is there any site that gives you the building material list up front?
Dennis
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The plans makers figure they would go broke supplying all the info with no commitment. Consider alternatives to traditional stick built homes. If you are on a budget, you can save a bundle on energy cost for the life of your home. Check out insulating concrete forms (ICF's) from places like www.standardicf.com www.polysteel.com www.integraspec.com I think you may find them easier to get information for what you need.
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You can also check out alternatives like steel frame, SIP, cordwood masonry, etc. Steel Frame and SIP construction is about on the same cost level as stick built, given the current demand due to hurricanes and reconstruction in Iraq, but the manuafacturers will give you ballpark costs for given floorplans (usually not including the cost of erecting).
Cordwood masonry used either as a primary structural component or as infill for timberframe is/can be a LOT less costly than stick built and typically has insulation characteristics on par with SIPs (R40-R60 walls - 12-24" thick). Do a google search on Cordwood masonry for more info.
Other alternatives are earth bermed, straw, etc.
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You can also check out alternatives like steel frame, SIP, cordwood masonry, etc. Steel Frame and SIP construction is about on the same cost level as stick built, given the current demand due to hurricanes and reconstruction in Iraq, but the manuafacturers will give you ballpark costs for given floorplans (usually not including the cost of erecting).
Cordwood masonry used either as a primary structural component or as infill for timberframe is/can be a LOT less costly than stick built and typically has insulation characteristics on par with SIPs (R40-R60 walls - 12-24" thick). Do a google search on Cordwood masonry for more info.
Other alternatives are earth bermed, straw, etc.
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tillman snipped-for-privacy@comcast.net says...

I've always thought that rammed earth looked like an interesting alternative. But like all alternatives, you have to convince the local building department.
--
Homo sapiens is a goal, not a description

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Find out what recycled materials are around. Or what is produced locally. Shipping is $$$. And/or waste products. 2x4's 18" to three feet long, with enough, will build a house w/ solid double walls, insulation between. Tires. Beer cans filled w/ water, imbedded in cement. A bottler MAY fill them for you. Cheap. Reuse & recycle. If you truly wish to save money, learn about alternative construction. Be ready to work. It'll take twice the time you think it will.
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Many home plan providers have "info packs" for $5 or so. These often include a wide ranging estimate of the construction cost for different regions of the country. Local builders can show you plans they've built and give you a better idea of prices, and architects can provide a pretty close estimate. Architects are not free, you'll pay an hourly fee to develop and get bids on a plan.
If you really need an exact price, where $75 is a big deal, building may not be for you.
Barry
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On Sun, 19 Dec 2004 20:33:38 GMT, Ba r r y

Check into those concrete dome houses, perhaps. IIRC, they can tell you what it's going to cost right offhand. I believe they are a bit less expensive, and signifigantly more energy efficient than stick framed homes.

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I'd suggest you consider needs carefully and work from there. Kids?? Building codes can ruin you big time, depending upon where you are. If it meets your needs, a used doublewide can be cost effective, BUT you'll have to shop very carefully for moving/setup. Most people who have that stuff done are over the barrell, not in a position to bargain, so to speak. You might even find a repo on which you can deal, on land, or not. I once bought a nice DW on an acre, adnittedly in the country but on a river, for $40K! We used it as a cabin for years and sold for more. It was a little cheesy, but very well laid out and comfortable 3BR, 2B, good A/C and E heat.
Shell homes can be a good deal. They go up fast and are all dried in and finished outside. You do the inside.
Wilson

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If you live in the northeast(approx New Enlnd to Chgo), you might try www.bardenhomes.com Barden supplies the vertical structure and the exterior finish (shingles, siding, windows, doors). On the interior, they provide a complete trim package. Barden designs and finances the project too. You act as your own GC.
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I'd suggest checking for a manufacturer like this in your area. The home is basically conventionally framed off site and shipped in by truck to be erected with a crane. http://www.boxhomes.com/House_Set_July_2003.shtml You can get a quote for a house that is "dried in" (the shell complete with roofing, exterior windows and doors installed and maybe even the exterior finish.) Then you can take your time, save up money, and finish the inside with the mechanicals and amenities you want/can afford. You will be the General on the job, but most of the engineering has been done for you. --dave

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