Home Depot Lifetime Service adventure

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On Friday, March 13, 2015 at 5:01:29 PM UTC-4, Ed Pawlowski wrote:

ight be better for me if I was given an estimate for the more expensive old -school repair he said "Ah, get your lunch money first and then explore oth er options. No problem." He then provided an R&I repair estimate similar t o all the rest.

Thanks for the advice (seriously) but this is not my first rodeo. I've been dealing with Ins Co's and collision shops all my life. Deer strikes, accid ents that were my fault, accidents that were not. I've even had a car repor ted "stolen" by a repair shop after they broke the front end suspension and then couldn't find parts to fix it. The "stolen" car found about 2 miles f rom the shop even though it was undriveable because they had taken the fron t suspension apart. These guys were good. Although I could never prove that they did it, the grill, bumper, headlights, etc. were all smashed. It look ed as if a tow truck had backed into it, doing enough damage for the Ins Co to total the vehicle. Since a tow truck was the only way to move the vehic le from the shop to where it was found, it was a perfect plan on their part . Wreck the car, tow it off of their property and then report it stolen, al l because they could not fix it.
Trust me, no one was actually using a tow truck to steal a 15 year old 1966 Rambler Ambassador - yes, the Lay Down Rambler of Dilbert McClinton lore. ;-)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mNZqWX4VNaI

Last year a storm-felled tree totaled my previous Ody. The Ins Co offered m e $3300. I told them to try again and less than 24 hours later they came ba ck with a $5200 offer, higher than any book value or on-line price I could find. That money went towards the replacement Ody that was damaged at Home Depot.

I just bought this one in July...no plans to trade it in anytime soon.
I may investigate the paint-less repair option or I may do nothing and trea t SWMBO to a couple of car payments to ease the pain of the car she bought yesterday.
BTW...here's the damage. This is what $500 worth a damage looks like...it's hard to tell, but there's a slight dent along with the scratches.
http://i440.photobucket.com/albums/qq121/DerbyDad03/Fender%20Dent_zpsrgq1h9 dk.jpg
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On Fri, 13 Mar 2015 15:45:40 -0700 (PDT), DerbyDad03

Buy some scratch filler, at Home Depot.
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On 03/13/2015 03:45 PM, DerbyDad03 wrote:

No wonder insurance rates are what they are!
--
"Socialism is a philosophy of failure,the creed of ignorance, and the
gospel of envy, its inherent virtue is the equal sharing of misery"
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On Fri, 13 Mar 2015 17:52:49 -0700, Doug Winterburn wrote:

We had an old Chevy Astro that got rear-ended at a stoplight. Needed a new back bumper and the dent in the back door fixed. I don't remember the exact numbers, but the low estimate was over $3000 and the most optimistic estimate of the van's value was about $2700. We traded it in :-).
The adjuster whose estimate I used spent about a half hour going over the damage and waking out the estimate. I told him I had no intention of fixing it and offered to pay him for his time. He refused, but said he appreciated the offer - most say nothing and he never sees them again. Guess where I'm going if I do want something fixed.
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On 3/13/15 5:45 PM, DerbyDad03 wrote:

on a Home Depot gift card! I bet they'd jump at that knowing they're getting it all back. :-)
--

-MIKE-

"Playing is not something I do at night, it's my function in life"
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On Friday, March 13, 2015 at 9:36:06 PM UTC-4, -MIKE- wrote:

Why would I do that when they've already committed to sending me a check for the lowest of the 2 estimates that I submit?
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On 3/13/15 9:41 PM, DerbyDad03 wrote:

Then go for $750!
--

-MIKE-

"Playing is not something I do at night, it's my function in life"
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There are pro's that can repair dents inexpensively with out the need for reprinting.
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On 3/15/2015 10:57 PM, Leon wrote:

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wrote:

As long as the paint is intact. If it's scratched or cracked, all bets are off.
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Scratches are ok if not through to the metal, they can be rubber or polished out.
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It's really easy if they're rubber. ;-)
If the clear coat is busted they can't just be polished out.
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On 3/13/2015 5:01 PM, Ed Pawlowski wrote:

My experience is that the dealer is the worst place to bring the car. Bring it to a good shop.
--
Jeff

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On Tuesday, March 10, 2015 at 12:32:46 AM UTC-4, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

placed and about 10 other things occur before I have to worry about warrant y issues.

they work great to drive tiny hinge screws, drill the holes for pulls, and they are just dandy inside a cabinet when replacing or adjusting drawer ha rdware. Both we $99 with on battery each, and a charger. They are fine li ttle drills.

etermination, write a report on his findings and then make a suggestion as to what repairs MIGHT be authorized. He told me that it could take him a m onth in the store to get to them, and if they were found to be in warranty, it could take another month to have it certified by the national repair de pot, and then if it was the batteries ONLY, then they could possibly ship n ew ones to me in another 10 days to 2 weeks after that. So the whole proce ss could take as much as 2 1/2 months! I was shocked. The tool guy did a cursory inspection and agreed that when new batteries were put in the old d rills they both worked fine. When the old batteries were put in a new test charger, they showed as defective. However, he determined the issue neede d more research on his part. (Clever man... I thought for a moment I was at the monkey cage at the zoo...)

resolution and they were more tired of people calling to yell at them for store related issues. With their help they told me how and what to say (th eir corporate buzz words) to the store manager to get the project off cente r. It worked!

ister, and then contacted them by email as instructed on their website. Th ey didn't realize that you couldn't access their registration screens after the tool and its parts were registered. The reason was that anyone could change their serial numbers to tools found in pawn shops, etc. without havi ng bought the tool new. So my CS email response was for me to simply go th e website and register.

I couldn't register them myself and a phone call was required. On a previ ously registered tool only Ridgid CS could modify any information. So toda y, she took my info over the phone and my account was updated within the ha lf hour.

as be patient. That being said, HD/Ridgid are the only guys that will warr ant tools for more than a few months (most not at all) for contractor use.

I'm curious as to why they replaced the batteries under warranty. If I unde rstand the terms of the warranty correctly, wouldn't "dead batteries" after 4 -5 years of use be excluded due to the "normal wear and tear" clause?
Here are a few of excerpts from their warranty website.
https://www.ridgid.com/us/en/full-lifetime-warranty
*** Begin Included Text ***
What is Covered
RIDGID tools are warranted to be free of material and workmanship defects.
What is Not Covered
Failures due to misuse, abuse or normal wear and tear are not covered by th is warranty.
DEFECTS IN MATERIALS OR WORKMANSHIP:
It is our experience that a product that fails prematurely due to a manufac turing defect in materials or workmanship, will generally do so very early in the products life cycle, often the first or second time the product is u sed. When returned for inspection, these products are generally found to st ill be in like new condition and show very little signs of use. It is uncom mon for a product that was manufactured with a defect, to survive under nor mal use for any extended period of time. Products that are returned for war ranty inspection after months or years of continuous reliable service are r arely found to be defective. The most common demand for service is the resu lt of normal wear and tear issues, which are not considered to be a defect in materials or workmanship.
*** End Included Text ***
Can a dead battery really be considered "defective" after 4-5 years of "con tinuous reliable service"?
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On 3/17/2015 8:23 AM, DerbyDad03 wrote:

would be defective. If it had a 3 year warranty it would not be defective after 4~5 years. The warranty pretty much spells out what is considered defective.
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On Tuesday, March 17, 2015 at 11:32:47 AM UTC-4, Leon wrote:

misplaced and about 10 other things occur before I have to worry about warr anty issues.

as they work great to drive tiny hinge screws, drill the holes for pulls, and they are just dandy inside a cabinet when replacing or adjusting drawer hardware. Both we $99 with on battery each, and a charger. They are fine little drills.

s determination, write a report on his findings and then make a suggestion as to what repairs MIGHT be authorized. He told me that it could take him a month in the store to get to them, and if they were found to be in warran ty, it could take another month to have it certified by the national repair depot, and then if it was the batteries ONLY, then they could possibly shi p new ones to me in another 10 days to 2 weeks after that. So the whole pr ocess could take as much as 2 1/2 months! I was shocked. The tool guy did a cursory inspection and agreed that when new batteries were put in the ol d drills they both worked fine. When the old batteries were put in a new t est charger, they showed as defective. However, he determined the issue ne eded more research on his part. (Clever man... I thought for a moment I was at the monkey cage at t

nty resolution and they were more tired of people calling to yell at them f or store related issues. With their help they told me how and what to say (their corporate buzz words) to the store manager to get the project off ce nter. It worked!

register, and then contacted them by email as instructed on their website. They didn't realize that you couldn't access their registration screens af ter the tool and its parts were registered. The reason was that anyone cou ld change their serial numbers to tools found in pawn shops, etc. without h aving bought the tool new. So my CS email response was for me to simply go the website and register.

hat I couldn't register them myself and a phone call was required. On a pr eviously registered tool only Ridgid CS could modify any information. So t oday, she took my info over the phone and my account was updated within the half hour.

ell as be patient. That being said, HD/Ridgid are the only guys that will w arrant tools for more than a few months (most not at all) for contractor us e.

fter 4 -5 years of use be excluded due to the "normal wear and tear" clause ?

rly in the products life cycle, often the first or second time the product is used. When returned for inspection, these products are generally found t o still be in like new condition and show very little signs of use. It is u ncommon for a product that was manufactured with a defect, to survive under normal use for any extended period of time. Products that are returned for warranty inspection after months or years of continuous reliable service a re rarely found to be defective. The most common demand for service is the result of normal wear and tear issues, which are not considered to be a def ect in materials or workmanship.

Apparently, that is not the case. Please see my earlier response to MM. I h ave since learned that there is a difference between Rigid's "Full Lifetime Warranty" and their "Lifetime Service Agreement". The warranty doesn't cov er normal wear and tear, but the "Service Agreement" does.
I was mistaken when I said I was curious as to why the batteries would be c overed under the Lifetime Warranty. They weren't. They were covered under t he Lifetime Service Agreement because they were eligible for that coverage and properly registered by the original purchaser.
That explains why Ridgid has different pages for the "Full Lifetime Warrant y" and the "Lifetime Service Agreement". They are not the same thing.
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On Tuesday, March 17, 2015 at 2:52:16 PM UTC-5, DerbyDad03 wrote:

me Warranty" and their "Lifetime Service Agreement". The warranty doesn't c over normal wear and tear, but the "Service Agreement" does.

the Lifetime Service Agreement because they were eligible for that coverag e and properly registered by the original purchaser.

You got it.
When you buy their tools, it is important to recognize which warranty you a re getting and what is covered. When I bought those two drills year ago I asked my commercial rep over and over if the batteries were covered and he always said "yes". He showed me the warranty, and it clearly stated that t hey were.
Note that any kind of misuse or abuse negates both of the warranties were a re speaking of from Ridgid. So (as they told me on the national hotline) i f you take a tool to them that has had the hell beat out of it, they don't have to cover it.
My commercial rep told me that HD intended to back their product, but they were counting on (as do all manufacturers) that most tools wouldn't be regi stered at all, registered incorrectly, or not in time. How many have put o ff registering because they knew they had 3 months, then forgot about it?
Then the registration process at that time required that you actually cut t he UPC bar code off the box and send it in with your registration request. They sent me an email that told me my account was ready to go, then I regi stered everything online. I don't know how they do it now, but I am sure t hey still make it a bit of a task.
Lastly, how many folks would need or take advantage of their warranty? If a homeowner feels they have gotten a good tool's worth of work out of a too l, likely they will just buy the newest, latest and greatest. Some folks j ust don't feel like the warranties are worth fooling with.
HD does make it easy, though. You can simply drop off you HD registered too l at any HD and they will fill out the paperwork with you, including a pape r that says you will allow them to repair the tool for a fee if there is ab use or excessive wear determined, and you drive away. They will pack, ship , and eat the receive on their nickel if they fing the tool qualifies for w arranty.
Overall, I am pretty happy has I have my two little drills back. I have a few over fifty overlay cabinet hinges to install today along with a few set s of drawer slides. With one drill set up to drill pilot holes and the oth er driving the hinge screws it moves along nicely.
Robert
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On Wednesday, March 18, 2015 at 5:08:28 AM UTC-4, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

time Warranty" and their "Lifetime Service Agreement". The warranty doesn't cover normal wear and tear, but the "Service Agreement" does.

er the Lifetime Service Agreement because they were eligible for that cover age and properly registered by the original purchaser.

I asked my commercial rep over and over if the batteries were covered and h e always said "yes". He showed me the warranty, and it clearly stated that they were.

if you take a tool to them that has had the hell beat out of it, they don' t have to cover it.

gistered at all, registered incorrectly, or not in time. How many have put off registering because they knew they had 3 months, then forgot about it?

. They sent me an email that told me my account was ready to go, then I re gistered everything online. I don't know how they do it now, but I am sure they still make it a bit of a task.

The registration process was pretty simple. The instructions in the package said to register the serial numbers on-line, print out the completed form and then mail in the form, receipt and bar code. However, once you enter al l of the serial numbers, there is a message that says you can streamline th e registration process by entering the numbers under the bar code on the re ceipt instead of mailing the paperwork in. Only if there is a problem will they request that you mail in the paperwork. I've got everything ready to g o if they request it.

ool, likely they will just buy the newest, latest and greatest. Some folks just don't feel like the warranties are worth fooling with.

per that says you will allow them to repair the tool for a fee if there is abuse or excessive wear determined, and you drive away. They will pack, sh ip, and eat the receive on their nickel if they fing the tool qualifies for warranty.

ets of drawer slides. With one drill set up to drill pilot holes and the o ther driving the hinge screws it moves along nicely.

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On 3/18/15 6:32 AM, DerbyDad03 wrote:

That was my experience. I hear people complaining all the time about how difficult their registration process is. I think the internet and instant results to everything have spoiled a lot of people. Any time you have to mail anything in and wait a couple weeks, people act like they're making you cross the Rockies in a covered wagon.
My drills/driver/batts are all registered and listed on my account page on the Ridgid website. I bought the tools specifically for the LSA and "free batteries for life" that they were advertising at my local store. I'm extremely satisfied with the performance of these tools, so overall I'm glad I bought them and would do so again without the free batteries or LSA.
However, if they ever give me a hard time about giving me "free batteries for life" I will absolutely blow a gasket on them. I think I even took a picture of the sign they had on their display. :-)
--

-MIKE-

"Playing is not something I do at night, it's my function in life"
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On Wednesday, March 18, 2015 at 10:50:47 AM UTC-4, -MIKE- wrote:

I don't know when the last time those "people" tried to register a product, but - unless they contact me - I won't have to mail anything in.
My experience was indeed the "internet and instant results" we have become accustomed to. I have to hand it to HD for making the process so simple. On e could argue that it is to their disadvantage to have eliminated the need for us to mail in the paperwork. The easier they make it, the more people w ill register, the more it may cost them. On the other hand, they don't have to pay as many people (or a service) to handle all of the registration pap erwork and match it up with the information submitted on line. (Imagine doi ng *that* job day in and day out!)
The only issue I had was this:
I entered the product number of the combo pack and the on-line form listed all of the items included, along with the individual model numbers. The on- line model number for the charger did not match the model number on the bot tom of my charger. I called their 800 number and the rep said "Don't worry, you have the newer model charger. Just go ahead and enter your S/N and you 'll be fine."
I followed her instructions, but I also sent in a separate request via thei r on-line contact form just to get it in writing, since my registration pag e shows the old model number, not the one on my charger.
Other than that, I am (so far) completely satisfied with the registration p rocess.

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