Home Depot Lifetime Service adventure

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As a contractor, my tools are usually dropped, fall off roofs and ladders, have heavy things fall on them, get left out in the rain, get stolen, mispl aced and about 10 other things occur before I have to worry about warranty issues.
However, I bought a pair of ultra compact 12v Li drills about 4 or 5 years ago when they first came out. I bought them to use on my kitchen work as t hey work great to drive tiny hinge screws, drill the holes for pulls, and t hey are just dandy inside a cabinet when replacing or adjusting drawer hard ware. Both we $99 with on battery each, and a charger. They are fine litt le drills.
But the batteries finally died. I took the to the local HD as instructed a nd had a really bad time. The "tool guy" had to look at them, make his det ermination, write a report on his findings and then make a suggestion as to what repairs MIGHT be authorized. He told me that it could take him a mon th in the store to get to them, and if they were found to be in warranty, i t could take another month to have it certified by the national repair depo t, and then if it was the batteries ONLY, then they could possibly ship new ones to me in another 10 days to 2 weeks after that. So the whole process could take as much as 2 1/2 months! I was shocked. The tool guy did a cu rsory inspection and agreed that when new batteries were put in the old dri lls they both worked fine. When the old batteries were put in a new test c harger, they showed as defective. However, he determined the issue needed more research on his part. (Clever man... I thought for a moment I was at t he monkey cage at the zoo...)
I called the national number to tell them what was going on. They told me that they were tired of being blamed for the long wait times for warranty r esolution and they were more tired of people calling to yell at them for st ore related issues. With their help they told me how and what to say (thei r corporate buzz words) to the store manager to get the project off center. It worked!
From start to finish of this episode I had two new batteries in my hands in 3 1/2 weeks. But I wasn't through.
The batteries came with a stern warning to register them within 90 days or there would be no further battery warranty. I tried several times to regis ter, and then contacted them by email as instructed on their website. They didn't realize that you couldn't access their registration screens after t he tool and its parts were registered. The reason was that anyone could ch ange their serial numbers to tools found in pawn shops, etc. without having bought the tool new. So my CS email response was for me to simply go the website and register.
After a while, I gave up and called national customer service again. They lady on the other end of the phone sighed pretty heavily and told me that I couldn't register them myself and a phone call was required. On a previou sly registered tool only Ridgid CS could modify any information. So today, she took my info over the phone and my account was updated within the half hour.
So the moral is, register the tools correctly, know that they will honor th eir warranty in some cases, and know you will have to work for it as well a s be patient. That being said, HD/Ridgid are the only guys that will warran t tools for more than a few months (most not at all) for contractor use.
Hey... at least it worked, and I have my two favorite mini drills back!
Robert
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snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

I'm glad it worked out for you!
Bill
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snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

-------------------------------------------------- Since you have learned how long it takes to get a warranty claim resolved, a suggestion.
Next time they have a sale buy a spare unit complete with batteries and stash the whole thing behind a box of your favorite stogies.
That way, you're covered when a primary unit craps out and you need to stay in production.
SFWIW, that's what I did when I bought an 18VDC, H/F unit.
A spare battery was going to be about $13-$14 and a complete unit was less than $17.
It was a no brainer.
Have fun.
Lew
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On Tuesday, March 10, 2015 at 12:07:12 AM UTC-5, Lew Hodgett wrote:

Well, if I put it by my favorite stogies, I certainly wouldn't misplace the m! Sadly, they don't put the Ridgid brand name on sale unless they have a new model of a tool, or a they are introducing a new tool.
Their tools used to be a bit less expensive than the brands like DeWalt, Ma kita and Bosch, but no longer so. But those guys can't touch the Ridgid war ranty, so at their price they make the Ridgid brand a good deal. I have a 4" pad sander, and two 5" ROS machines I can't kill. Those 5" sander have ground down several hundred feet of fascia to prepare them for painting. P ut that 60 grit pad on then and you make short work of chipping paint.

Whereas I bought my two drills with two batteries for $99 with a charger, t hey sell the drill kit with one battery and the charger (just one drill, I got a pair with two batteries) for $99.

I remember when you were talking about the HF drill here. Buying a second one made perfect sense. If the drill quits, you have another, and likewise with the battery. How do you like the HF drill? Get good service from it ?
Robert
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I remember when you were talking about the HF drill here. Buying a second one made perfect sense. If the drill quits, you have another, and likewise with the battery. How do you like the HF drill? Get good service from it? -------------------------------------------------------- Right now those drills are functioning as a set of matched bookends.
Will try cleaning the grill with a synthetic brush in a few weeks.
Lew
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On Tuesday, March 10, 2015 at 2:35:54 PM UTC-5, Lew Hodgett wrote:

Well, that's good to hear. As has been discussed/cussed here, in my opinio n it seems that the quality of HF tools is going up and the quality of the rest of the guys is going down. I don't see how you could beat the drill d eal that you got. Looking forward to what you have to say after putting it to the test cleaning your grill.
Robert
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I called the national number to tell them what was going on. They told me that they were tired of being blamed for the long wait times for warranty resolution and they were more tired of people calling to yell at them for store related issues. With their help they told me how and what to say (their corporate buzz words) to the store manager to get the project off center. It worked!
And those magic words were...?? Did they include "straight razor" and "cojones"?
Hey... at least it worked, and I have my two favorite mini drills back!
I'm glad your problems were resolved. Is the store manager still intact?
--

dadiOH
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On Tuesday, March 10, 2015 at 6:32:09 AM UTC-5, dadiOH wrote:

e





LOL, gotta chuckle out of that. I was quite nice to him actually. I told him that I knew he was new manager to the store with only 6 months under hi s belt and that I knew he had a lot to deal with tending to so many "proble m" employees.
I told him what went on at the store, and he was fairly concerned. I then told him that I knew that a man as busy as he was sorting out his store wid e problems might not have a chance to tend to my small one. So to take the problem off his back, I offered to call the national contractor's line in GA and tell them about our conversation, then go over the customer service issues in the store and we could see how they thought best to handle my dri ll problem.
That way (I theorized out loud), if they wanted to write up his customer se rvice staff for lack of performance he wouldn't get any blame himself for f orced employee discipline other than the fact that all store activity was h is responsibility. I offered the idea that it was possible that since he h ad only been there six months they might give him a pass on his inability t o get his employees to do their job properly. As an added note, I added th at after a bit of consideration I thought contacting the national desk was the thing to do as they might be able to give him some much needed manageri al guidance on his employees if they had the signal that they were a bit ou t of control.
After some thoughtful remarks from him, he assured me that he could take ca re of it himself on a local level and there was NO REASON AT ALL to call th e national contractor desk. I told him... no problem at all on my part as I could call them on the way to the next job. In a way, I told him I thoug ht that having me call might actually be doing him a favor as it could help corral some of his bad employees without getting his hands dirty. No favo rs wanted, needed, or requested he adamantly told me.
It was all pretty pleasant, really. But he actually looked pretty upset wh en I left. But a few days later, I had batteries on my front porch at my h ouse. So I guess we all stayed friends. ;^)
Robert
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I told him what went on at the store, and he was fairly concerned. I then told him that I knew that a man as busy as he was sorting out his store wide problems might not have a chance to tend to my small one. So to take the problem off his back, I offered to call the national contractor's line in GA and tell them about our conversation, then go over the customer service issues in the store and we could see how they thought best to handle my drill problem.
That way (I theorized out loud), if they wanted to write up his customer service staff for lack of performance he wouldn't get any blame himself for forced employee discipline other than the fact that all store activity was his responsibility. I offered the idea that it was possible that since he had only been there six months they might give him a pass on his inability to get his employees to do their job properly. As an added note, I added that after a bit of consideration I thought contacting the national desk was the thing to do as they might be able to give him some much needed managerial guidance on his employees if they had the signal that they were a bit out of control.
After some thoughtful remarks from him, he assured me that he could take care of it himself on a local level and there was NO REASON AT ALL to call the national contractor desk. I told him... no problem at all on my part as I could call them on the way to the next job. In a way, I told him I thought that having me call might actually be doing him a favor as it could help corral some of his bad employees without getting his hands dirty. No favors wanted, needed, or requested he adamantly told me.
It was all pretty pleasant, really. But he actually looked pretty upset when I left. But a few days later, I had batteries on my front porch at my house. So I guess we all stayed friends. ;^) ----------------------------------------------- You silvered tongue'd devil.
Bet you're still grinnin<G>
Lew
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On Wednesday, March 11, 2015 at 12:28:36 AM UTC-5, Lew Hodgett wrote:

Yeah... a little bit!
Years ago I got tired of being the only guy upset with my problems. This is a much better way for me to handle things to keep my blood pressure in check and have a bit of fun at the other guy's expense.
Robert
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On 3/11/15 10:36 AM, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

This all makes me look very forward to whatever hoops I'll have to jump through when my Ridgid batteries eventually crap out. :-)
--

-MIKE-

"Playing is not something I do at night, it's my function in life"
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On 3/11/2015 10:36 AM, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

One thing nice with becoming older, you learn how to fineness the crowd a bit better. ;~)
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On Wednesday, March 11, 2015 at 1:52:07 PM UTC-5, Leon wrote: .


True. And for me, I try to figure out the best way to handle these things without getting myself upset, pissed off, and off the rail of concentrating on my jobs.
I try to always have a plan "B", and sometimes even "C" regardless of the s ituation. So in this case, rather than to have one of those nasty, loud ca ses of self righteous indignation, my plan was simple.
IF... if they were going to keep my drills for almost three months, I was r esigned to that. So, I figured when I went to HD to get the replacement hi nges I needed I would pick up a new drill, identical to my favorite. To be fair, I would wait until the very last minute which would have given them a couple of months to resolve the issue. I would use it for a couple of we eks as needed, then return it under their "satisfaction guarantee" policy.
Then I could comfortably wait for HD to get the new batteries to me with no stress on my end.
Certainly, age and experience pay off in a big way in these cases as I was only tense for about a day before I came up with plan "B". Once I had plan "B" (the drill purchase/return) then I decided to have some fun at the man ager's expense.
It all works out in a much easier fashion for me these days than the old "t hunder and lightening" days. Still, I don't always know when my cork is go ing to pop or what is going to do it, so I try to keep an eye on things and not let myself be put in a position where folks see me lose my composure. These days I would rather suck the lifeblood out of someone a pint at time and enjoy knowing they didn't push my buttons rather than to fire off a lo ng string of profane descriptions of certain body parts being crudely inser ted into other certain body parts.
And the results are actually a little better for the most part(not always)w hen I stay calm and figure the best approach.
Robert
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snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

Nice job! I once wrote a letter to Delta about one of their "Authorized Online Dealers", and how they weren't living up to the promises made for such dealers, and I got results that were nothing short of "amazing" too. I think the page has been deleted (seriously).
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It is nice that the warranty is a life time one but a shame that they discourage you to use it. This is not the first time that I have heard this review of the process, I double checked your post date to make sure it was not an old review that I have read that resurfaced. I do believe that Festool would probably warrant their original batteries for 3 years, even with contractor use. Unfortunately Festool does not warrant against loss or theft. :-(
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On Tuesday, March 10, 2015 at 12:32:46 AM UTC-4, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

, have heavy things fall on them, get left out in the rain, get stolen, mis placed and about 10 other things occur before I have to worry about warrant y issues.

s ago when they first came out. I bought them to use on my kitchen work as they work great to drive tiny hinge screws, drill the holes for pulls, and they are just dandy inside a cabinet when replacing or adjusting drawer ha rdware. Both we $99 with on battery each, and a charger. They are fine li ttle drills.

and had a really bad time. The "tool guy" had to look at them, make his d etermination, write a report on his findings and then make a suggestion as to what repairs MIGHT be authorized. He told me that it could take him a m onth in the store to get to them, and if they were found to be in warranty, it could take another month to have it certified by the national repair de pot, and then if it was the batteries ONLY, then they could possibly ship n ew ones to me in another 10 days to 2 weeks after that. So the whole proce ss could take as much as 2 1/2 months! I was shocked. The tool guy did a cursory inspection and agreed that when new batteries were put in the old d rills they both worked fine. When the old batteries were put in a new test charger, they showed as defective. However, he determined the issue neede d more research on his part. (Clever man... I thought for a moment I was at the monkey cage at the zoo...)

e that they were tired of being blamed for the long wait times for warranty resolution and they were more tired of people calling to yell at them for store related issues. With their help they told me how and what to say (th eir corporate buzz words) to the store manager to get the project off cente r. It worked!

in 3 1/2 weeks. But I wasn't through.

r there would be no further battery warranty. I tried several times to reg ister, and then contacted them by email as instructed on their website. Th ey didn't realize that you couldn't access their registration screens after the tool and its parts were registered. The reason was that anyone could change their serial numbers to tools found in pawn shops, etc. without havi ng bought the tool new. So my CS email response was for me to simply go th e website and register.

y lady on the other end of the phone sighed pretty heavily and told me that I couldn't register them myself and a phone call was required. On a previ ously registered tool only Ridgid CS could modify any information. So toda y, she took my info over the phone and my account was updated within the ha lf hour.

their warranty in some cases, and know you will have to work for it as well as be patient. That being said, HD/Ridgid are the only guys that will warr ant tools for more than a few months (most not at all) for contractor use.

As long as we are propping up Home Depot...
A few weeks ago I went to a local HD and parked in a spot where there were no other vehicles or carts or anything nearby. When I came out I saw that o ne of these carts was about 3" from the driver's side fender.
http://farm5.staticflickr.com/4109/5606502231_d744d28f7e_z.jpg
After closer inspection I found a small dent and some orange paint on my fe nder, at the exact height of the corner of the cart.
I went inside, found a manager, and asked him to come outside. He looked at the situation and told me that he would file a report. He noted that 90% o f parking lot damage claims are denied, but this one looked like a no brain er and that he would say so in his report.
About 2 weeks later I got a call from some firm representing Home Depot and was asked a few questions about the incident. They promised to get back to me in a few days, which they did. It is now my responsibility to submit 2 estimates to have the damage repaired. The representative promised that Hom e Depot will pay the lower of the 2 estimates.
My plan is to go to 2 dealer body shops, where I assume I will get the high est estimates.
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On 3/10/2015 2:45 PM, DerbyDad03 wrote:

he zoo...)

Don't assume the dealer body shop will be the higher estimate. Most all body shops are governed by what the insurance companies are willing to pay so they compete in that regard. If you intend to actually use the money to repair the dent you want to get the estimates from the body shops with the best reputations.
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On Tuesday, March 10, 2015 at 4:06:34 PM UTC-4, Leon wrote:

e:

ers, have heavy things fall on them, get left out in the rain, get stolen, misplaced and about 10 other things occur before I have to worry about warr anty issues.

ears ago when they first came out. I bought them to use on my kitchen work as they work great to drive tiny hinge screws, drill the holes for pulls, and they are just dandy inside a cabinet when replacing or adjusting drawer hardware. Both we $99 with on battery each, and a charger. They are fine little drills.

ted and had a really bad time. The "tool guy" had to look at them, make hi s determination, write a report on his findings and then make a suggestion as to what repairs MIGHT be authorized. He told me that it could take him a month in the store to get to them, and if they were found to be in warran ty, it could take another month to have it certified by the national repair depot, and then if it was the batteries ONLY, then they could possibly shi p new ones to me in another 10 days to 2 weeks after that. So the whole pr ocess could take as much as 2 1/2 months! I was shocked. The tool guy did a cursory inspection and agreed that when new batteries were put in the ol d drills they both worked fine. When the old batteries were put in a new t est charger, they showed as defective. However, he determined the issue ne eded more research on his part. (Clever man... I thought for a moment I was at the monkey cage at t

d me that they were tired of being blamed for the long wait times for warra nty resolution and they were more tired of people calling to yell at them f or store related issues. With their help they told me how and what to say (their corporate buzz words) to the store manager to get the project off ce nter. It worked!

nds in 3 1/2 weeks. But I wasn't through.

s or there would be no further battery warranty. I tried several times to register, and then contacted them by email as instructed on their website. They didn't realize that you couldn't access their registration screens af ter the tool and its parts were registered. The reason was that anyone cou ld change their serial numbers to tools found in pawn shops, etc. without h aving bought the tool new. So my CS email response was for me to simply go the website and register.

They lady on the other end of the phone sighed pretty heavily and told me t hat I couldn't register them myself and a phone call was required. On a pr eviously registered tool only Ridgid CS could modify any information. So t oday, she took my info over the phone and my account was updated within the half hour.

or their warranty in some cases, and know you will have to work for it as w ell as be patient. That being said, HD/Ridgid are the only guys that will w arrant tools for more than a few months (most not at all) for contractor us e.

!

ere no other vehicles or carts or anything nearby. When I came out I saw th at one of these carts was about 3" from the driver's side fender.

y fender, at the exact height of the corner of the cart.

d at the situation and told me that he would file a report. He noted that 9 0% of parking lot damage claims are denied, but this one looked like a no b rainer and that he would say so in his report.

and was asked a few questions about the incident. They promised to get bac k to me in a few days, which they did. It is now my responsibility to submi t 2 estimates to have the damage repaired. The representative promised that Home Depot will pay the lower of the 2 estimates.

highest estimates.



I'll let you know what they say...I'll be getting more than 2 estimates any way.
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On Tuesday, March 10, 2015 at 4:06:34 PM UTC-4, Leon wrote:

e:

ers, have heavy things fall on them, get left out in the rain, get stolen, misplaced and about 10 other things occur before I have to worry about warr anty issues.

ears ago when they first came out. I bought them to use on my kitchen work as they work great to drive tiny hinge screws, drill the holes for pulls, and they are just dandy inside a cabinet when replacing or adjusting drawer hardware. Both we $99 with on battery each, and a charger. They are fine little drills.

ted and had a really bad time. The "tool guy" had to look at them, make hi s determination, write a report on his findings and then make a suggestion as to what repairs MIGHT be authorized. He told me that it could take him a month in the store to get to them, and if they were found to be in warran ty, it could take another month to have it certified by the national repair depot, and then if it was the batteries ONLY, then they could possibly shi p new ones to me in another 10 days to 2 weeks after that. So the whole pr ocess could take as much as 2 1/2 months! I was shocked. The tool guy did a cursory inspection and agreed that when new batteries were put in the ol d drills they both worked fine. When the old batteries were put in a new t est charger, they showed as defective. However, he determined the issue ne eded more research on his part. (Clever man... I thought for a moment I was at the monkey cage at t

d me that they were tired of being blamed for the long wait times for warra nty resolution and they were more tired of people calling to yell at them f or store related issues. With their help they told me how and what to say (their corporate buzz words) to the store manager to get the project off ce nter. It worked!

nds in 3 1/2 weeks. But I wasn't through.

s or there would be no further battery warranty. I tried several times to register, and then contacted them by email as instructed on their website. They didn't realize that you couldn't access their registration screens af ter the tool and its parts were registered. The reason was that anyone cou ld change their serial numbers to tools found in pawn shops, etc. without h aving bought the tool new. So my CS email response was for me to simply go the website and register.

They lady on the other end of the phone sighed pretty heavily and told me t hat I couldn't register them myself and a phone call was required. On a pr eviously registered tool only Ridgid CS could modify any information. So t oday, she took my info over the phone and my account was updated within the half hour.

or their warranty in some cases, and know you will have to work for it as w ell as be patient. That being said, HD/Ridgid are the only guys that will w arrant tools for more than a few months (most not at all) for contractor us e.

!

ere no other vehicles or carts or anything nearby. When I came out I saw th at one of these carts was about 3" from the driver's side fender.

y fender, at the exact height of the corner of the cart.

d at the situation and told me that he would file a report. He noted that 9 0% of parking lot damage claims are denied, but this one looked like a no b rainer and that he would say so in his report.

and was asked a few questions about the incident. They promised to get bac k to me in a few days, which they did. It is now my responsibility to submi t 2 estimates to have the damage repaired. The representative promised that Home Depot will pay the lower of the 2 estimates.

highest estimates.



Here are the 6 estimates that I received for the fender damage that occurre d in the Home Depot parking lot. The vehicle involved is a Honda Odyssey.
All collision shops were told the same 3 things:
- Damage occurred in a Home Depot parking lot - Home Depot said to submit 2 estimates, they will pay the lower of the two - The Home Depot Claims Department did not request, and does not have, pict ures of the damage
$546 - Honda Dealer $534 - Honda Dealer (See Note below) $491 - Chevrolet Dealer $485 - Local Collision Shop Chain (13 locations) $479 - Independent Collision Shop $456 - Independent Collision Shop
Note: The 2nd Honda dealer was the only collision shop to suggest the "pain t-less repair" process to fix the damage. When I reminded him that it might be better for me if I was given an estimate for the more expensive old-sch ool repair he said "Ah, get your lunch money first and then explore other o ptions. No problem." He then provided an R&I repair estimate similar to al l the rest.
I've just faxed the 2 Honda dealer estimates to Home Depot.
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On 3/13/2015 2:58 PM, DerbyDad03 wrote:

Take the money and then take the car to the shop that you think will do the best job. You can put $90 in your pocket, but if the final work is not up to your expectations, it is not a bargain. Do not assume that the Honda dealer will be the best final finish. They may be an authorized dealer, but they may or may not have good body men and paint men.
Another option is to do nothing and trade it in. They will knock something off the trade, but perhaps less than the lowest bid.
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