Home Depot and power tools

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There is a lesson here. Based on your experience at HD, I'm going to check my stock of screws and place an order with McFeelys to eliminate the need to go through the same torture.
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Let me get this right. You went to the BORG and nothing SCANNED???
I don't want to sound paranoid or anything, but you probably just died in a parallel universe. Go to the doc and get checked out immediately! You can not survive in this universe if you are unscannable. Be afraid, be very afraid.
<G> Sorry, I am in that kind of mood today.
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Toss your car keys down next to the bag. Always works for me.
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You often are. <G> (Then, in my best Sammy Davis Jr impression): "Don't ever change!"
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<snipped some>

SWMBO out of town, so I went to the grocery store the other day. Brought my own cloth bags so I wouldn't have to take the plastic "landfill clogging, crude oil using" bags. I run races and many of them give away a promotional light cloth bag with the race goodies in them, so I've got a bunch.
For some reason the self check out system does not like me using my own bags. Attendent had to reset on just about every scan. Seems like most of the regular check out lines not too happy to see them either, not part of the " system".
We will all be there some day, better start getting ready now.
Frank
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Frank Boettcher wrote:

How does the checkout system know what kind of bag you are using?
Maybe grocery stores where you are are different from the ones here but the ones here have a conveyor--you scan, put the item on the conveyor, it goes down a ways and stops in a holding area and the only time you bag is when the conveyor is full, and at that point the system doesn't care if you put in a plastic bag, a paper bag, the cart, toss it out the window, eat it, or shove it up your butt.
--
--
--John
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On Mon, 5 May 2008 09:55:53 -0400, "J. Clarke"

Don't have a clue. I normally use self check out and have never had a problem. Only thing different this time was my cloth bags.

Self check out. No conveyor here. Scan the item, Miss autovoice tells you to put it in the bag. Three racks of bags. Won't proceed until you do. I put my cloth bag up where the plastic bags are. Didn't like it.
Regular checkout, cashier uses a bag carousel down stream of the conveyor and scanner loaded up with the plastic bags. They don't care to fumble with my cloth bags, but I intend to continue, one way or the other.
Frank

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On Mon, 05 May 2008 09:42:39 -0500, Frank Boettcher

Around here they ENCOURAGE you to bring your own.

Don't put the bag on the coveyor to start. When it says put first item in bag,put the item in YOUR bag, and then place YOUR bag on the bag-hook.

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<clare at snyder dot ontario dot canada> wrote in message wrote:>

I think you need to put your bag on the bag hood before starting the new transaction or scanning. That area has a scale and weighs everything including your bag that you did not scan.
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Leon wrote:

And it's probably the excessive tare weight of the other bag that's the problem Frank's having--his bag weighs too much so it figures the sorry sob customer is trying to sneak something out...too many "smarts" for its own good. :(
And now I have yet another reason add to my list of why to avoid the d-d things completely... :)
--
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I suspect the scale resets/re weighs the remaining bags before each new transaction.
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On Mon, 5 May 2008 12:07:23 -0500, "Leon"

But it does NOT know what an itemX weighs if it is not sold by weight. Putting the bag on first makes the machine think something has gone through without being weighed. Putting the bag AND item on at the same time satisfies the system. Try it. It works.
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<clare at snyder dot ontario dot canada> wrote in message

Oh yes it does. I have had the self check out tell me to rescan an item that was too heavy. I had a heavier and lighter weight item in my left and right hand. Accidentally I scanned the lighter more expensive item with my right hand and dropped the cheaper and heavier item from my left hand, in the bag. It balked. Even back in the mid 80's merchandise was being weighed per part. General Motors could, with some accuracy, determine if a shortage claim was legitimate by comparing the parts sold to a dealer with what the actual weight of the order was before it was shipped to the dealer. If the shipping weight was under the actual weight of what the order should have been there was no problem having the claim accepted. I assure you that the with 99% certainty weight is know on every item with a bar code. This is very helpful in determining shipping costs on a shipment before an order is picked. I am sure that the rest of the retail industry has caught up in the last 25 years. But there is a possibility that not every retailer is taking advantage of this information.

If you have already started the transaction the bag will be considered an item to be purchased. At some point between the last customer and the next customer the scale has to reset otherwise replenishing an empty bag hook would set off a warning.
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Hmm... wonder if anyone's been successful at using that to his advantage (although maybe I shouldn't even bring this up and give anyone ideas?). If somehow he should know a couple of items that are equal weight - within whatever tolerance is used - could he scan the cheaper one and place the higher-priced one in the bag? Say a gallon of paint vs a $200 power tool? Or is the system smart enough to only de-activate the sensormatic tag when the correct barcode has been scanned?
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Keith Carlson wrote:

If the system isn't smart enough to tell the difference I'd hope the employee watching over the self service scanners would be.
--
Jack Novak
Buffalo, NY - USA
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Nova wrote:

The machines in my area have ATM-style cameras, as well as cameras hanging from the ceiling above.
Since so much retail store theft involves employees, I have no doubt that all of it works.
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It's interesting how this works. In general I think I've read that most retail theft is from within, but in places like Home Depot, Lowes, etc. it's from customers. The biggest areas - power tools. Can't imagine how one could walk out with a new cordless drill, complete with plastic case, but they do.
To top that - two local Home Depot stores were recently hit for pretty big wire thefts. The culprits cleared an entire shelf (one that required a ladder to access), of spooled copper wire. You're talking stuff that required a flat cart to carry. Worse, you're talking materials that required the "customer" to use a ladder to clear off the shelf - the kind of thing that would seem to stand out to store employees since customers are not allowed on the ladders. The wire spools were all tagged with the anti-theft devices. Yet, the thieves managed to get the products, remove the tags, and get out of the stores with the cart full of the stuff. The estimated value from at least one of these two stores was $3,000. That's a lot of spools of wire.
A good friend is the electrical associate in one of those stores. He was working that night and is pretty diligent about tending his department. All it takes though is a customer (or accomplice) to distract an associate in another aisle. HD's policy is that if a store discovers a theft like this, they notify the neighboring stores so they can be on alert, since so many times these are not isolated incidents. When they notified the other stores, one discovered that they too had been hit in exactly the same way.
Just shows to go ya...
--

-Mike-
snipped-for-privacy@alltel.net
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"Mike Marlow" wrote:

"Shrinkage" is a major problem at the retail level.
I have a friend who was involved for many years in retail fraud investigation and now is a cashier at Home Depot.
You would be amazed at some of the methods used to steal material, then sometimes try to return it for full credit at the same store.
A lot of it is by independents but it appears organized gangs are now targeting DIY operations like Lowes, H/D, etc.
As this is being written, the City of Long Beach, CA is being attacked by a bunch of thieves stealing manhole covers.
New: $500; Scrap: $10 max; however, major problem is liability when someone drives into an open manhole before the City can make repairs.
Times are getting tough out there.
Lew
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At the same time a lot of employees are afraid to take the risk. An the companies send out mixed messages also, clerks are told to cooperate with a armed robber, yet are expected to run down a shop lifter. I worked loss prevention for a couple of years and you're never sure what you are dealing with. The worst of course is a user trying to get enough cash for their next fix, the least dangerous are the professional thieves.
There was an unarmed security guard shot here within the last six months when he went to confront a shoplifter
--
Mike
Watch for the bounce.
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