Home Depot and power tools

Page 1 of 6  
Well, the folks we love to hate have done it again.
The LOML and I went to Home Depot, and I got my errands done before she did, so I went to drool over the stationary power tools while I waited. Couldn't do it. No display. Pation Furniture was there instead.
The person at the Contractor desk said that Corporate had decided that the tool display wasn't bringing in enough sales, so they still had the tools, in the box, and they could show me pictures of what they looked like, but that was it.
I suggested that I never bought things like that from pictures, and he agreed, but said no one at the decision level wanted to hear concerns from the front lines. I look to see big iron tools dropped from their stores pretty soon, cause they don't sell any without working display models. Watch for the closeouts, might be able to score a gloat or two.
Old Guy
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

They did this at a Home depot near me a couple a months ago. The floor displays they had were sold at 30% off. The only had the jointer and drill press left to sell when I got there. I already had a new jointer just got last fall but the drill now sits in my shop...
Randy http://nokeswoodworks.com
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Yeah - it's true that people who make decisions make those decisions based on what they observe and someone "on the front lines" is always going to be upset. But - in the world of retail, leaving hunks of iron or any other product out on the floor, just because you or I like to drool over it without purchasing, is quite foolish. That floor space is needed for the things that will turn cash. Like it or not - this time of year, they are going to turn cash with patio stuff. I'd be willing to bet that if you were seriously looking to buy, someone would have opened up all the boxes you wanted to see. But you weren't - and you're commenting about them providing for the most of their customers (as indicated by the floor sales), because like the rest of us, you just wanted to drool over the tools. For all the bitching that goes on around here about every retailer out there, one would think that people would find it agreeable that a major retailer would dedicate their floor space to the products that the consumers are really after at any given time of year.
As for never buying things from pictures - good for you. I do buy some things just from pictures. I just bought a new spray gun just from a picture on a web site. Didn't need to handle it or anything else, to know what I was going to get. In your case, you weren't even going to buy, so what's the big deal?
Sorry - this is just my personal campaign against all of the posts that populate this forum that bitch about what the big retailers do, regardless of how practical those decisions may really be in light of the population they serve, or the realities of business.
--

-Mike-
snipped-for-privacy@alltel.net
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I wonder how many tools Old Guy has bought online or over the phone or mail order without ever handling or seeing them in person. Or seeing and handling them in person from a local retailer and then purchasing them online at a lower price. For specialty activities, like recreational home woodworking, online/catalog/mail order/phone purchasing probably consumes a considerable amount of the sales revenue. I would guess almost all of the Grizzly machine owners on this forum never saw their machines before they were delivered.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Thu, 1 May 2008 08:12:19 -0400, "Mike Marlow"

<a lot of relevant and accurate info snipped >

Over my many years with Delta, one of the things I used to hate to hear from marketing is "we've just cut a deal with (fill in your favorite big box retailer) to offer selected units in the industrial line".
I would be guaranteed the necessity for working overtime in a chaotic manner to fill the units per store requirements by the contract time since they were never part of the original forecast.
A year or two later, I could be guaranteed that I would have a large inventory reset with units sent bact to the factory as the current set of big box execs. figured out how dismal their inventory turns were on the iron and their minimum ratio of turns to space couldn't be met.
During the contract, I could be guaranteed that my warranty would go up due to the liberal big box return policy and the inability of the machinery sales people to make sales stick. The "I'm finished with my project, think I'll take this thing back and get my money back" syndrome.
And the cycle would repeat itself as soon as the memory of the past faded, or the big box buying execs turned over. For the manufacturer's marketing arm, it's like candy, you just can't resist it.
IMHO heavy iron belongs with the local distributor. Their sales and service personnel are generally properly trained for the task.
Frank
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Frank Boettcher wrote:

Did you get many of the "I need a new part, I'll buy a tool, pull the part, and return the tool sans part or with the busted one" syndrome?

--
--
--John
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Thu, 1 May 2008 10:53:17 -0400, "J. Clarke"

Hard to say, information coming back was often sketchy. Picture an RSR (retail sales rep), usually young and fairly inexperienced who gets to the store, has to set up any aisle displays that have been authorized, check shelf stock,cleans stuff up, sets up a reorder, maybe has an in store class to give, then lastly heads for the return cage to authorize the RMA's for an equally inexperienced store clerk. Most reasons are "alledged defective" Then rushes out because he's got three more stores to get to today. And both these individuals are more used to dealing in small stuff, much of which has a "destroy in field" policy.
Industrial distributors and the sales people who call on them, are more like old partners, tend to know their customers, can spot customers who might have a history of questionable returns, can immediately fix problems to keep returns from happening in the first place. It's where heavy iron belongs.
Frank

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
You know Frank... I found that hard to believe until I actually heard a guy bragging about bringing a shop vac back to Sears after he had used it to clean up his garage.
I have since had people suggest to me that any "special" tools needed for a project can be done in a similar manner.
I thought it was maybe one or two out of a thousand, but now I believe it is a wildly popular method.
Frank Boettcher wrote:
The "I'm finished with my project, think I'll take this thing back and get my money back" syndrome.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

It is also a popular method of cleaning the basement after local flooding. We all pay higher prices for our tools because of these bozos.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
"Pat Barber" wrote:

A 25% restocking charge, but only with a receipt would solve that problem in a hurry; however, until the retailers figure out it has to be done by the entire retail industry, it won't happen.
At the industrial level, returns are few and far between, almost always with a restocking charge.
Lew
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Ahhh..., the insurance fraud thing. Two thoughts...
Your neighbor got just what he deserved. I hope it was worth it for him.
Secondly, insurance companies are putting more and more people into fraud investigations. The reason is simple. It doesn't cost them anything. Every dime that it takes to pay these guys is less than the recovery/savings on bad claims.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Eww. That kind of dishonesty never even occurred to me.
I did laugh some years ago when a friend took a worn-out BB gun back to Wal-mart. His intention was to buy a new one, so he took the old one with him to show the kind he wanted. When he got there a clerk insisted that he return it. The return form asked why he was returning it. He wrote, "wore out". They gave him a new one.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Yup, HD is closing 15 under performing stores and stopping the opening of FIFTY stores.
At HDepot returns I stood behind a pair of losers that returned three tree trimming saw chains. They said their boss got them new that morning, but they were already worn and dull. Farkers.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

If I worked at the returns desk of HD and the like, I'd be fired the first day for hitting the customer with crap like that. That is just plain fraud and the stores and manufacturers willfully allow it with their policies.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

When going to school and working part time in the early 70's I worked in the automotive department of the old Woolco stores. Next to our department was the Glidden paint department. Even back then paint that was being returned for a refund had to be inspected to insure that a refund on a paint can full of water was not being given.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Thu, 01 May 2008 15:35:41 +0000, Pat Barber wrote:

The first I heard of it was several years ago when a guy who ran a camping goods store told me I wouldn't believe how many tents he sold - for two weeks! He also told me how much he added to the price of tents to allow for that, but I forget the percentage - it was however, up in double digits.
I can't comprehend people who have that little ethics and that much gall. They might as well just rob the store, but that would make them liable for criminal penalties. Hmmmmm ...
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I have a friend who "borrowed" a PC saw from, I think, HD. The day he was returning it, I asked why. He was done with it. I blew my stack. He still has the saw, a decade later...one of the last U.S. made ones, too.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Around here the returns desk is populated with low paid teenage girls who are too busy gabbing about the party last night or flirting with some teenage boys, to do their job right. At the best of times they don't even know what the item returned does or how it operates. All you have to say is it doesn't work, and they will refund your money, as they couldn't determine if you are right or wrong or cheating.
Again management does itself in.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

To be fair - they are cashiers, not product specialists. I don't expect a cashier to know anything about the product she is checking out.
--

-Mike-
snipped-for-privacy@alltel.net
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.