Hole spacing

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On Aug 21, 12:54pm, " snipped-for-privacy@att.bizzzzzzzzzzzz"

It doesn't. That's one of them there scientific old wives' tales, as related by our resident old wife.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hubble_Space_Telescope#Origin_of_the_problem
R
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The problem there is clearly not due to the use of the metric system, but to trying to mix the two.

Metric.
Try it.
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Let;s add the complexity of working in a foreign language or conversion to another measurement system to the guy that already has trouble with math!
More practical? A calculator.
Wot and idiot!
---------------- "Doug Miller" wrote in message Metric. Try it.
----------------

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On Sat, 20 Aug 2011 20:53:17 +0000, Doug Miller wrote:

I bought some wood taps and dies once to make some wooden vise screws. I used a 1" dowel (yes it was 1") for the screw. I cut threads in it and the hole to receive it with no problem. But the screw wouldn't fit.
Turns out the tap and die were 25mm, not 1" (25.4). So yes, it can make a difference.
I got a fresh dowel and turned it down to 25mm or a little less.
--
Intelligence is an experiment that failed - G. B. Shaw

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hole, tolerances of 0.005" or less can be critical. When you're talking about a border around something, the difference between 1/4" and 6mm is unlikely to be important to anyone, or indeed even noticeable.
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Some people just cant do the math and since that is what this OP was about... Doug rules supreme.
--------------- "Doug Miller" wrote in message Totally different context. When you're talking about fitting a shaft into a hole, tolerances of 0.005" or less can be critical. When you're talking about a border around something, the difference between 1/4" and 6mm is unlikely to be important to anyone, or indeed even noticeable.
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I used to work designing and creating artwork for business forms. If they were to be run through a computer printer they had to be designed and created with precision. I still have a number of forms design rulers that have scales in various inch units such as 5/32", 5/64", 1/12", 1/6", 1/3", 1/10", 1/5", all the regular multiples of 1/32" common most rulers in addition to metric. Spacing in typesetter's points where 72 equal one inch, with scales in units such as 5 pt, 5 1/2 pt, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 12, 13, and 16 point multiples.
I find that these scales are valuable in woodworking as one can find a scale to fit any need, plus they are stainless steel and almost indestructible.
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I'm surprised that no one has yet mentioned (unless I missed it) the old trick of using a ruler, selecting a number of arbitrary evenly spaced markings corresponding to the number of holes needed, then angling the ruler diagonally across the workpiece (or on a bench where the workpiece is laying, if necessary) until lines drawn perpendicular to a line parallel to the holes match up with the selected ruler marks. No math or arithmetic necessary. Unfortunately easier shown than explained, but some older woodworking books have pictures of the technique.
--
Better to be stuck up in a tree than tied to one.

Larry Wasserman - Baltimore Maryland - lwasserm(a)sdf. lonestar.org
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"Larry W" <

This method has been mentioned. The problem is that even though the hole centers are spaced equally the spaces between the holes differs. i.e. The space between the left border and the first hole as well as the space between the last hole and the right border are twice the space between the other holes. It's up to the OP to decide if that is acceptable. phil k.
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On Saturday, August 20, 2011 10:46:19 AM UTC-7, Paul wrote:

First, locate hole #1 and #6 (mark the centers on the work). Then connect those centers with a line.
Draw a second line through #1, and mark off six equal spacings on that second line (any spacing that comes out evenly on your ruler will do). Adjust a bevel so that one arm is on the secondary line, and the other arm connects #6 secondary to #6-actual. Then with that bevel set, trace from the other marks on the secondary line to the original line.
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On 8/20/2011 12:46 PM, Paul wrote:

Start first hole center 29/32" from the end. Center each of the remaining hole 25/32" from the first hole center.
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On 8/20/2011 4:42 PM, Leon wrote:

See pdf in a.b.p.wppdwprking hole spacing.
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Leon wrote the following:

You like that 'p' key, huh?
--

Bill
In Hamptonburgh, NY
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On 8/20/2011 5:03 PM, willshak wrote:

Some times the keys on my key board trade places. '~)
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On 8/20/2011 4:55 PM, Leon wrote:

That's the same thing my spreadsheet came up with a couple of hours ago, in about 1/10 and 1/2 seconds. LOL
The question remains ... is it really what the OP is asking for?
He could want the edge of the holes 1/4" from the edge of the 6" board.
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On 8/20/2011 5:14 PM, Swingman wrote:

Spread sheet! I dont need no stinking Spread sheet. LOL I took 6" -1/2" for both borders - 4 1/2" for the holes and ended up with 1. Divided 1 by the number of spaces, 7, and got .014285" for the spaces, then I drew it. '~0
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each hole.
http://www.seoconsultants.com/charts/inches-decimal/ or 25/32 .78125 closest to .7857
Pin
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On 8/21/2011 6:40 AM, Leon wrote:

Except that it's .140xxx". LOL
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On 8/21/2011 9:43 AM, Swingman wrote:

FARK! Maybe I do need a spread sheet.
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On 8/21/2011 6:40 AM, Leon wrote:

Getting older each day, I simply got damned tired of rebuilding the wheel every time I needed to _quickly_, and evenly, space slats between table or chair legs _without fuss_.
... and without putting the decimal place in the wrong spot. :)
So I sat down, expressed how I came up with a solution algebraically <one that ALWAYS works, to the decimal point> each time I had to do it, and in less time that it takes to tell, and put it in a spreadsheet.
It's called making technology work for you ... when you get old enough to experience old timer's disease, you'll understand, you young whippersnapper!
<may be sooner than you think with that B'day within a week> :)
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