Hole Saw

I confess that I know next to nothing about working with tools. With that said, I'm doing a small project at home that called for 2 cuts with a 2-3/8" hole saw. I went out and bought the saw blade for my Ryobi drill, brought it home and got everything ready to do the cuts. Turns out I can't attach it to the drill. There's a large threaded hole on the back of the blade but I don't have anything to use to attach to my cheap, bare-essential drill. What do I need? I've looked online and I've seen things like arbors and mandrels mentioned, but I'm not really sure what would be appropriate. Any help would be greatly appreciated! Thanks!
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http://www.coastaltool.com/cgi-bin/SoftCart.exe/a/ab/leno/holesaw.htm?E+coastest
Industrial quality holesaws use a (3/8"?) screw-in arbor up to about a 1" dia cutter. Over that size, they screw in and lock with two fixed pins. The arbor shank size for the larger bits requires a 1/2" drill. I can't recall how the hardware store ones lock.
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Jon Kinsman said:

You need an arbor for the blade - I'm sure the saleman would help you pick an appropriete model. Usually, the packaging notes which model is needed. FWIW,
Greg G.
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<Greg G.> wrote in message

Correct, but check out the size. Some arbors are 1/2" and unless you have a 1/2" chuck you'll have to turn it down on a metal lathe.
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Edwin Pawlowski said:

Or buy a bigger drill. Yea, that's the ticket - More Power - UGH, UGH UGH.
Greg G.
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Harbor Freight had a set for $3.00! it goes up to 2 1/2" Frank
Jon Kinsman wrote:

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"Jon Kinsman" writes:

<snip>
Don't want to rain on your parade, but to safely operate a hole saw that size requires a right angle drill, IMHO.
Let a saw that size hang up in the hole and rip a straight drill out of your hands before you can let go of it and you will know why you use a right drill.
Next, you need an arbor for that hole saw, about $15 should do it.
Any decent industrial hardware store or Grainger, if you have an account, will have what you need.
HTH
Lew
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your
Solution: Drill slowly.
--

-Mike-
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"Mike Marlow" writes:

Define "slowly".
Sooner or later, a hole saw in a straight drill will bite you big time.
If you are going to use hole saws, get a right angle drill.
Been there, done that.
Lew
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On Tue, 12 Oct 2004 00:37:02 GMT, "Lew Hodgett"
I prefer to use my timber-framing drill (slow, big handles). The right-angle drill goes at the same speed as the normal drill.
--
Inbreeding - nature's way of always giving you enough fingers to count your cousins

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Lew Hodgett said:

Don't mean to rain on yours, but I do it all the time. The cheap drill probably doesn't have the power to wrench it from his hands, and the chuck will probably slip before his wrist gives out. ;-)
It kinda depends on what he is planning to drill, and how fast he plans to try it. Obviously, a 3" hole in styrofoam isn't as strenuous a task as 3" of SYP.
FWIW,
Greg G.
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<Greg G.> wrote in message

I do it as required too. I don't own a right angle drill so I use my drill motor for everything. Mine is a DeWalt that has plenty enough power to give you a good wrench if you're not paying attention, ergo my suggestion to drill slowly. Yeah - you can certainly get a bite if you wander off of true, but with a reasonable speed it's not something most people couldn't handle. I've just come to accept over the years that drill motors can give you a twist in a number of uses so they require more than just casual attention when used. I have used right angle drills but largely found them to be quite awkward, slow and generally not much of an improvement over a regular drill motor with the possible exception of confined spaces.
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"Mike Marlow" writes:

drill
Ever consider picking up a low cost right angle attachment?
They also can be a PITA until you get used to them.

I have an 18 VDC DeWalt and it can definitely bite you, even at low speeds..

give
Amen, which is why I use a right angle drill.

Usually operate mine at 200 RPM which allows me better control if the saw binds.
Most of my work is involved with boat construction.
Translation:
Most of the time you are standing on your head, working in tight places, wishing you had a tail like a monkey you could use to grab onto something<G>.
Lew
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Well, since you admitted you know next to nothing about working with tools, then let me step up to help you. First, you can't do what you want to do with just a hole saw. You'll need at least a tablesaw, a jointer and a good router. Trust me on this. If you really want to do the job properly, you'll also need a bandsaw, a drill press, a planer (or a dozen or so good hand planes), and my favorite - a set of cutting torches. I know you may find the cutting torches to be a bit odd right now, but again, trust me. Thousands of jobs go easier with a set of torches.
Now, if you really don't care about doing the job the right way and turning out a quality product that you can be proud of and expect your grandchildren to enjoy years from now, you can probably just go to the hardware store and as the clerk for a mandrel to fit your particular hole saw.
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