Hitachi C10FL Tablesaw, Any Good?

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I did pick up a copy of Tools and Shops ($10 for a magazine! Ouch). I agree it wasn't all that informative from a review standpoint, but it did let me know what saws were available, what features I should be looking at, and some of the pro's and con's of each saw.
Based on the article, the lack of accessories or parts, and the minimal user feedback, I decided against the Hitachi saw.
The Tools and Shops article rated the Woodtek as the best buy, but two things turn me away from that saw. First, it's a brand I've never heard of, and is probably similar to the Hitachi for getting parts and accessories. And second, I don't know that I want an electronic display on a power tool. It may just be me, but a dusty environment with vibration and whatnot doesn't seem like a reliable place to stick an electronic control. I'd fear it failing in a few years and costing a small fortune to replace if it was even still available.
Based on price, availability, and options for parts and accessories, the Jet ProSaw's are kind of high on my wish list right now. I've read several positive reviews, and the saw is available from a number of sources.
Although, the Craftsman still interests me a little too. I'll have to check them out the next time I run to Sears.
As I mentioned in my intial post, I wasn't really looking for a new saw, the Hitachi at Lowes just caught my attention. So I may end up getting nothing and just make do with my current saw a few more years.
Thanks,
Anthony
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Do not buy the Hitachi C10FL!
Hitachi claims that their 10' Stationary Table Saw (Model C10FL) produces 3 horse power. However, if you look on the right side of the Table saw, below the table extension, you will see a little specification plaque that states the saw uses a 120V (standard AC) cord. This makes producing 3HP impossible, I will explain why.
Standard AC cords are limited to 15 amps of current, or about 1800 watts. At 746 watts/horsepower, and considering efficiency losses, 2 HP is all you can get, and even then the starting currents might be tripping circuit breakers. This would bring the Hitachi's actual power rating down to around 1.5 hp, with most of its competitors. I would go with the Delta 36-979 for a couple reasons, other than the fact that they lie about their power ratings.
1. The Hitachi C10FL does not have a solid cast iron table and extensions like the Delta 36-979. The Hitachi table is cast iron, the extension wings are not. 2. The Hitachi Table Saw, Band Saw, Drill Press, Scroll Saw, Disc Sander, and Planer do not have the "Hitachi 5 year warranty". On the Hitachi website it states that these items, "...are warranted to the original purchaser to be free from defect in materials and workmanship for a period of two (2) years from the original purchase date."
With Hitachi you are paying for power that you are not getting. I own the Delta 36-97 and love it.
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In article
snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

Thanks for the info!
My local Lowes is offering the C10FL for 500.00 with a 100.00 gift card included.
I was wondering if it was worth consideration or not, apparently it is not. That's probably why they're trying to dump them. Has anyone noticed they have some Jet tools on their web site? That's a real change of distribution channels for Jet.
I am not one to "settle" for less than what I really want in tools and agree that an eh-ok tool will take up the same amount of floor space and nearly as much hard earned cash as what you really wanted.
Best regards,
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I own this saw and feel that it is a great value. It is a much better saw for the money than any other I reviewed. While it is true that running the saw on 120V may not provide the full 3 hp, you can wire it to single phase 220V. Mine is still set at 120 volt. I have ripped treated lumber 3-1/2'" deep where I had to cut it part way through, then flip it, without the saw bogging down.
One of the things that drew me to the saw was the fence. I like the way it operates and it doesnt' get sloppy over time. In addition, I like being able to move it around the shop using the integrated casters.
Inserts can be problematic. I made my molding cutter and zero clearance inserts from 0.125 aluminum. I did an extensive search and could not find the inserts as an accesory Regards, Dave G.
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On Saturday, December 1, 2007 10:46:37 AM UTC-6, HerHusband wrote:










I think I had the same Craftsman table saw, got it from a neighbor. I have the Hitachi there are only three things I don't like about it, when cuttin g thick material you have to go in stages instead of the blade depth, and t he slightest bump on the back end of the rip fence throws the accuracy off which means you have to reset it all the time. the good news is you can rep lace the fence with an after market. The casters are cheap they don't lift mine off the floor anymore, they also can be replaced with after market. I' ve had mine for a couple years now and I'm still happy with it. The thickes t I rip is 2x's does great on them much thicker and it struggles.
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I think you are off to a great start with investing in really good quality power tools like Hitachi. I own one after reading on really fantastic reviews (http://woodworkingtoolkit.com/hitachi-c10fl /) and no regrets so far.
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On 8/13/2016 6:22 AM, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

Not so sure I'd agree from the review.
Cons Right after setting this table saw up, you will notice that the Hitachi C10FL has a movable base that is simply just a base. It moves, but it lacks the general smoothness of a movable table saw. It is jittery at best and any ridges on the floor will literally bend the rollers. That’s right. It happened to many people. Which is more than weird, since Hitachi advertised this product as a “stationary table saw”.
It weighs a ton, and it makes no sense to have a table saw of this size and weight to be movable.
This table is also a potential fire hazard. The dust collection compartment is inside the table saw, so you visually have no idea what it is collecting. Sawdust that enters it is hot from friction so the risk of a fire is ever so present with this table saw model.
Furthermore, the instructions that came with the Hitachi C10FL table saw was literally rocket science. You absolutely need sound knowledge about the operational parts of a table saw to get it going. Not the easiest thing in the world if you’re a beginner or use your table saw for simple cuts.
It was also fairly pricey, and nothing can justify the price of this table saw. Absolutely nothing!
Conclusion We feel that the features of this table was “beef up” and didn’t reflect reality, at least, for its users. Many customers quickly found their way into a whirlpool of woes using this product. To think about it, how could Hitachi ever have released this table saw in the first place?
Hopefully, this old model by Hitachi will be relegated to table saw history and be nothing than a bad memory. Today, there are far superior table saws at a fraction of the price of the Hitachi C10FL. Both your money and time will thank you for looking the other way.
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On 8/13/2016 9:05 AM, Ed Pawlowski wrote:

LOL, the first listed "Feature"
Has a professional look. One of the things that got the Hitachi C10fl going was its great professional look.
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wrote:

It should have a great professional look. After all, "The C10FL is not an affordable saw.".
OTOH, he did get at least three hits on his lame web site.
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On Saturday, August 13, 2016 at 10:05:36 AM UTC-4, Ed Pawlowski wrote:

ity power tools like Hitachi. I own one after reading on really fantastic r eviews (http://woodworkingtoolkit.com/hitachi-c10fl /) and no regrets so far .


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Really? Table saw sawdust is hot enough to start a fire? Maybe that guy needs a new blade. ;-)
That would be prefect for one of those 3AM infomercials. Right after the guy with the ketchup stained shirt gets done fighting with his tangled garden hose and bumping his shin because he couldn't turn the light on, he can put out the fire under his table saw.
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On 8/15/16 9:45 AM, DerbyDad03 wrote:

Yeah, I think that guy might have the blade on backwards. :-)
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Well actually and even with a new blade a board can warp enough in the cut to bind and slow moving the work through the completion of the cut. This is one reason that some blade manufacturers add a non stick coating too the body of the blade, a party of the blade that ideally should never touch the wood. And since many TS's are used to cut constructing grade material it is difficult to find material that is not bowed or warped to some degree.
If you end up with burn marks on a cut it was hot enough and not all of that burn remained on the board. Does it happen often, I have only seen smoldering under the saw a time or two in 35 years and I took steps to insure that the smoldering did not catch fire but there was smoke coming out of the saw/base.

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On Monday, August 15, 2016 at 12:26:44 PM UTC-4, Leon wrote:

no regrets so far.

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If that's the case, then the review is accurate in terms of "it could happen". However, to be fair, the claim really should be modified to read:
"This table is also a potential fire hazard, as are all table saws."
"The 2016 Ford Monte Civic is an unsafe vehicle because a wheel could fall off." Factually true, but misleading none the less.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kqYF3G6GT8w


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On 8/15/2016 11:47 AM, DerbyDad03 wrote:

Precisely! And they totally missed fact that you could cut your finger off. ;~)
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snipped-for-privacy@eznet.net says...

What's the takeaway, that Russian quality control is even worse than Chinese or that Russians need to be introduced to the concept of "lugnuts"?
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