High effciency motors

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says...

Don't waste your time--if the catalog doesn't say "capacitor-start split-phase" he's not gonna accept it.
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@verizon.net says...

I don't know nuthin about this but
http://www.leeson.com/TechnicalInformation/sphase.html
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From an electrical engineering perspective, that article is wrong (and it shows how guys like Lew can get confused on the subject).
All of the motor designs shown there, except for the shaded pole motor, are split-phase motors. Any single phase motor with a starting or auxilliary winding is a split-phase motor, because the phase of the starting/auxilliary winding is not the same as the main winding. That's why they're called split-phase motors, because they have two windings with different phases.
John
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On Mon, 10 Aug 2015 14:53:43 +0000 (UTC), John McCoy

Actually, the shaded pole motor is also a split phase motor. The shading coil is the other phase. ;-)
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Well, in a sense that's correct, altho by extension that definition would mean all single phase motors are split-phase, since you have to have something offset from line phase or they'll never start rotating. It's not the most useful definition :-)
In engineering practice, tho, split-phase means split off from the line, as opposed to being induced (as is the case for the shaded pole motor).
John
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On Mon, 10 Aug 2015 19:23:55 +0000 (UTC), John McCoy

Yes, you need some offset but it could be a multi-phase (or DC/universal) motor rather than splitting the one phase. It might be true that all single-phase induction motors are split-phase. Can't think of a counterexample right now.

That's a distinction that's not universal.
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Probably not, altho in my experience it's always been so.
John
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On Sun, 2 Aug 2015 17:53:29 -0700, "Lew Hodgett"

A capacitor-start motor most certainly is a split-phase motor but the reverse is not necessarily true. That's exactly what the capacitor is for (to split the phases). The phase split can be done with resistance or capacitance.

You're wrong.

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