HF has shorter hours now in some stores

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heard that they are closing some stores early so employees can get home before the end of the game
err i mean to see the family
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On 1/30/2016 8:08 PM, Electric Comet wrote:

Being on their mailing list, I received a notice of that nature. They will close at 8 instead of 9. I assume all other email listers received the same notice.
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I received a notice too. Stores closing 8pm instead of 9pm so employees can spend more evening time with their families. Train your mind to test every thought, ideology, train of reasoning, and claim to truth.
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On 1/30/2016 8:15 PM, Meanie wrote:

I'm sure it makes economic sense. They know the dollar sales each hour and that last hour is probably too low to justify the costs of operations.
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There's often the official reason and the real reason. Economics are the real reason, but it's being sold as the official reason.
I've been in some stores (not just HF) during their last hour, and things were really slow. I don't blame them for not staying open if there's no one interested in shopping.
Puckdropper
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"Puckdropper" wrote in message

Yeah... This is mostly because the real emergencies, for which a new tool is needed, always happen shortly after the stores close anyway. This in turn leads to a busy morning.... ;~)
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John Grossbohlin wrote:

complain about. : ) They are used to customers that "know what they want" at that hour.
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A long time ago, I came across two very good pieces of plumbing advice: 1. Don't begin a project when the store is closed. 2. Make sure you have plenty of pipe caps. That way, even if the store is closed you can at least cap off the pipe and get the water back on.
Puckdropper
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On 1/31/2016 9:39 AM, Puckdropper wrote:

We visited my MIL about 360 miles away. She had a couple of dripping faucets. The main valve has not been turned in years. We usually visited on weekends. It bothered me seeing the drip but I was not about to tackle it on a weekend in case the water had to be turned off at the street. They still dripped when she eventually sold the house.
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On 1/31/16 9:28 AM, Ed Pawlowski wrote:

Any time I replace a faucet or toilet I bring a new 1/4-turn ball shut-off valve with me. The valves that are ubiquitous around here for the average ages of the home are what I can "infinity-turn" valves. :-)
You know, the ones that always get stuck in the on position from corrosion and feel like they're going to break off in your hand when you're turning them. And when you finally do get them turned off, they don't feel like they are stopped because the rubber washer seal is also corroded and torn or squished up. Then while you're working on replacing the faucet or toilet, you notice a little puddle under the valve because it never actually shut off all the way. And when you hook it back up to a new water supply hose, and turn it on it again feels like it's going to break off in your hand.
So you're left with the option of rebuilding the valve with a new rubber washer and stem packing or just putting a new valve on the water pipe. If you don't do one of these you're going to get called back when the old valve springs a leak (and it will) because you were the last man in. Putting on a new valve isn't that much more considering the parts and labor involved with rebuilding an old one.
I always try to talk my clients into letting me install a new 1/4-turn ball valve that I already have with me and will do for much cheaper than a plumber would charge, because it will benefit them by removing a huge potential for future water damage, *and* benefit me by making the sink/faucet/toilet replacement easier and less stressful. After hearing my explanation of the scenarios I described above, they usually see the wisdom in it.
--

-MIKE-

"Playing is not something I do at night, it's my function in life"
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On 1/31/2016 1:30 PM, -MIKE- wrote:

If i was doing it today I'd use the Sharkbite valves. If the water does not shut off so you can solder, the valve can just be pushed on and turned off.
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It sure beats trying to get the bread out of the pipe! (Even if you do take the precaution of leaving an exit. :-))
Puckdropper
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On 1/31/2016 2:55 PM, Puckdropper wrote:

Bread works better if you take the pastrami off of it first.
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On 31 Jan 2016 19:55:31 GMT, Puckdropper <puckdropper(at)yahoo(dot)com> wrote:

done. I *hate* plumbing repairs. I have nightmares of chasing broken pipes and fittings all the way under the street. ;-)
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On 1/31/2016 5:29 PM, krw wrote:

I have done more plumbing that I care to admit. Here is what I know. A fitting can be too tight or too loose.
Any other questions? LOL
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wrote:

Yeah, I know... Righty-tighty, lefty-loosey.
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On 1/31/2016 6:29 PM, krw wrote:

I was lucky. Bought my first house in 1966. Where I worked we built HVAC products for industrial, commercial, school use. The guys showed me how to solder, braze, weld materials. Another guy came to my house to do a little job for me but took the time to show me some basic wiring techniques. They saved me a bunch of money over the years.
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I know how to repair plumbing but something always breaks or leaks and shutoffs never do. If I can cut it out and replace, I'll do it. I repair nothing more than toilets (replace working bits).
Residential electrical is easy, by comparison. I've done everything short of replacing entrance panels (I've installed many sub panels).
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On Sun, 31 Jan 2016 20:08:05 -0500, krw wrote:

I think we must be related :-). I've wired two shops and upgraded house wiring, but when something more than a washer needs replaced I call a plumber!
--
Nobody expects the Spanish Inquisition!

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I've found several of the pros I've called are willing to show me stuff. I watched one guy clean the flue pipes on the boiler, he showed me what he did and I just added the procedure to my annual start up.
Unfortunately, no one ever bothered to tell me I needed to put oil in the Little Red Booster Pump. A bottle of compatible oil costs less than $5 and you only need about a tablespoon or so annually to prevent problems. That's downright cheap compared to the price of a new pump!
Puckdropper
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