hexagon


Can someone tell me how to lay out an eight sided roof for a birdfeeder? Thanks. Patt
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

??? Each adjacent side is cut at 22.5.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

First, you need to make up your mind: do you want a hexagon, or something with 8 sides (which is an octagon)?
--
Regards,
Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

http://www.delorie.com/wood/compound-cuts.html
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

particular question at this time. There's been a thread running for a few days on long miters and the difficulties of cutting them precisely. I'm pretty sure that what you're looking at are miters that are both quite long (several inches) and compound.
For an octagonal roof, that's going to require that each section be cut at 45deg along the X-Y axes and then angled along the Z-axis, perhaps 10-25 deg. or so, depending on how much pitch you want and how big an area you want to span.
I'd suggest cutting the octagonal sections first (that may require quite a bit of T&E) and getting them fitted. Then, angle them upward and make the undercut. Having not thought thru the project completely, I'm not sure just what you'd need as supports underneath when you put it all together.
Good luck, Tex
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

When you angle them up, it changes the angle of the miter needed to get them to fit properly. Hence my web page, which tells you the right angle for the *final* upward angle.
As for *making* the cuts, I use an Incra 5000 and t-track clamps.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I plugged in
number of sides 6
angle of sides 45
just to see if I could figure out what this is all about. This is what I got.
cross cut angle 22.2
blade angle 20.7
So if I set the blade at 20.7, and set a mitre of 22.2, and cut pieces to a sharp point, and arrranged them in a circular pattern I'd get a roof?
I have never used a chart, nor understand it (them). Is this a specific type of chart for circles, or is this the same type of chart you would likely see at the back of textbooks?
I'm gonna try 0 and 90 with 6 sides:
0 (flat) gives 30,0
90 gives 0,30
I definetely don't understand.
-
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Yes, six-sided and a 12inch/ft pitch

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Yes.
Yes. Assuming you're using plywood for this example, you'd end up with six triangles with square edges, which form a flat "circle" when combined.

90 means they're all standing up. If you cut out big squares with 30 degree bevels on each edge, you'd end up with, essentially, a six-sided box, without a top or bottom.
To avoid confusion, consider a four sided box with mitered edges. You'd use a 90 degree setting on the crosscut miter, and the blade would be angled 45 degrees. Nice box, yes? But if you set the miter at 45 and the blade at 90, you wouldn't get a box, you'd get a picture frame.
You want something halfway between a box and a picture frame :-)
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
30/30 `.
its magic.
-
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.