Help with Router choice

Please help me choose. I recently posted about which router to purchase and have narrowed it down to two.
1) Bosch 1617EVSPK which comes with RA1054 Deluxe router guide. The price for this is $309 (CAN) + taxes
2) Triton TRC001 for $259 (CAN) + taxes.
I am practically a virgin when it comes to woodworking but I am very eager to learn and get started. I would like to buy or make a table so this should probably weight into the equation.
I actually ordered the Triton from a company but it is taking forever to come in so I may order it from another website.
Please give me your opinions. I really only want to buy once.
Cheers
David
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
OuttKastt wrote:

David,
I can't give you any input on the Triton, but I've been pretty disappointed with the Bosch setup:
- The power switch has failed twice. It took a week to get fixed while under warranty, and when it failed the second time I fixed it using parts from Fry's Electronics. It's a poor design, and I expect it to fail again.
- The sub-base can't be centered externally using the centering tool. I've had three baseplates under warranty, and they're all crap.
- The Bosch templets are made of two-pieces of cheaply welded together steel. One broke in half under almost no pressure and ruined a $60 bit.
- Raising and lowering the router in the stand requires you remove pressure from the router base by lifting the router. Ya' know, if you create a base -specifically- to be used on a router table, you should be able to raise the router by simply turning the adjustment knob, -not- lifting the router and turning the knob simultaneously.
- It's more difficult to find accessories than with the Porter Cable equipment.
My two cents, but I'll never buy another Bosch router (and this from a man who has the Bosch 24V drill/sawzall/circular saw, demolition drill, jigsaw, and belt sander). This is the least satisfactory piece of equipment I've ever owned that had the Bosch name on it.
--
Michael White "To protect people from the effects of folly is to
fill the world with fools." -Herbert Spencer
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

My experience differs. The switch problem has come up here in the past. I've got mine mounted in a table so the switch is never used; it is just left "on" and an external switch is used. It is in a lift so the base plate is never used. As for the motor turning, it does that well .
If you can just buy the motor and use it like I do, it should be satisfactory.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I own 2 PorterCable 690's and two ancient old stanley routers and I love them all! The stanleys are just the right size for man handeling with one hand and they have some accessories that the new models don't. How about an electric planer attachment? The first time I used the electric planer attachment it did a miserable job. The second time I used it I figured out that the bit came to me with the helical blade on backwards. After turning the helical blade over on the shaft it has worked beautifully and I have used it dozens of times. The stanleys were both ebay purchases for around $20 plus extra for the planer attachments.
One of my 690's is stored with a 1/4" round over bit in it on a D handle base. That is it's whole purpose in life and it gets used alot.
The only place I have had problems with the 690's is with a big 45 lock miter bit in the PC table. It was just to big for the small router and the router spun this bit to fast. I have since purchased an old oliver shaper mainly for 45 lock miters. I love the 45 lock miter joint and use it a lot. After you set it up once and get used to it later setups are much quicker and easier.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I've had one for just over a year....works fine and has been trouble free......I paid $195.00(U.S.) at Costco, it had the two bases but no router guide (if I had bought it a month or two later Costco included a guide for a short while).....I use the plunge base freehand and the fixed base in a shop built table....for my needs it has had plenty of power....
Depth adjustment in or out of the table has been fine and is easy to dial in correctly....release the lock, turn a knob or the three step fast adjustment then relock....In the table I support the base with one hand when I release the lock so it doesn't thump(gravity)
The template guides have been fine but I needed to buy a full set instead of the bundled three...a template needed a different size.
I had no trouble centering the bit to the base.

Can't speak pro or con on the Triton

I like the Bosch....Rod
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Hi David, I have the Triton and think it is great. I know of no one who has one and doesn't like it. Best bang for the buck. It is best suited for router table use as it is a bit top heavy. If you plan on using a router out of the table I suggest you look at this site below. Personally I like the DeWalt 621 for out of the table use. As a virgin WWer you may not know that you will want at least two routers. One for the table (which you should build) and one for free handing. See Pat's site. Cheers, JG
http://www.patwarner.com /

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Eventually, probably true. But assuming you don't have an infinite tool budget, one will work just fine while you get started. Especially if it has 2 bases - that's a great compromise. I started out with just a fixed base, then I built a table, and switched it in and out of the table as necessary. Then I got a plunge base for my current router body, so I leave my fixed base in the table 99% of the time, just switch the motor back and forth, and use the plunger for freehand. A few months ago I got a laminate trimmer, which takes care of many handheld routing needs, but that meant I had to buy more bits with 1/4" shanks. This setup is serving me very well right now. If I start doing doors with raised panels, or other operations where the router is spinning large bits or taking off a lot of material, or if I find one really cheap, I might eventually get a larger router with thru-table-adjustment to leave in the table. (Based on reviews I've read, the Triton would be a contender there.) I think that's a pretty standard progression for many woodworkers, but of course that would vary according to what you make, your budget, available space, etc.
To sum up, you don't need 2 separate routers when you first start - get one good versatile one, build a table, see what you use it for, what it's not quite convenient for, and add to your router collection accordingly later. Mostly, have fun with woodworking, and buy tools as you need them and as you can afford them.

Very good advice! Highly recommended. Andy
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Excellent advice. I screwed up, and started out with a big, honking plunge router, 3+ hp. Scared me a bit, until I banished it to the homebuilt table.
Now I have 5 or 6 routers. If I had to choose, the PC 693 dual base kit would be the one I'd start with. That's closest to the Bosch in features, and competes closely with it. It's also on the backside of it's product life - for me, a good thing. PC figured to replace it with the 890 series, which has had some recall issues.
So the Bosch would be a good starter kit, if that's one of your two choices. The Triton, a little later.
Patriarch, advice worth amount charged...
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I own seven routers and have been woodworking for over 40 years. If I had to start over and only had enough money to buy one router I would buy a 2 1/2 HP multi base kit from one of the big name manufacturers like DeWalt, Porter Cable, etc. Bosch lost out because they didn't offer a 3 base set. This is the best size for user comfort with enough power to do reasonably well in a router table, and having all of the bases for it would allow easy conversion to hand-held use when needed. The top name brand choice gets you the widest choice of options at reasonable prices with relative ease of repair in the future.
I own the DeWalt DW618 three base set and have almost stopped using all of my other routers except for my laminate trimmer since I bought it. It's light and well balanced with enough power to do anything except panel raising. The Porter Cable set lost out by almost a flip of a coin decision. I picked the Dewalt after comparing the handling comfort as it just seemed to have a better balance than the Porter Cable.
--
Charley


"OuttKastt" < snipped-for-privacy@shaw.ca> wrote in message
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I don't own either one. I have a Hitachi M12V and a Freud FT200E. That should tell you that my budget limits my choices. I like them both. The Hitachi's rigged for a table with a router raizer on it. I don't use either one a lot but they've both done long hard work without complaining.
However: If I had the money in my pocket for either one of the two you mention, I'd go with the Triton without hesitation. I've heard only a few problems with the Bosch but I've never heard of any Triton problems and every Triton review I've seen was very positive.
Plus it's got bells n whistles I'd like to play with.
Of course, if I had that kind of money I'd probably have enough to buy both and then evaluate 'em, but that's neither here nor there. :-)
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

I can't comment on the Bosch, although IMO they make the best jigsaws ever.
I do have the Triton, and it's great. It's larger than most and probably more suited to a table, but I use it a lot free-hand. The gentle soft-start makes it very managable.
You say you only want to buy once, but the woodworking gods frown on that. I bought a very cheap chinese router to start with and got quite a lot of experience and use from it, before I bought the Triton. Now it still gets used for some jobs, as it's pretty small and light.
"One can't be too rich, or have too many routers" Anon.
Barry
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I own both that you are considering and like them both. I bought the Bosch 1617EVS in August of 1998 and the first unit had a switch problem. Not a fluke, simply an on going Bosch problem that many Bosch tools have. Other than that I like the router a lot. The switch has not failed in the last 9 years. I have had the Large Triton about 3 or 4 years and it residues permanently in the router table. Plenty of power and bit changes above the table are a snap.. I also have a Bosch plunge router that I bought in 1988 that has had its share of switch problems.
Side by side the Bosch looks better built but then again it is the one that has had problems.
I bought the 1617evs Bosch specifically to use with my Leigh DT jig.
Flip a coin.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

I have 8 routers, some of which actually still work. I have been making sawdust for many years. I recently purchased the little brother to the Triton TRC 001, the M0F001KC. Maybe I'm in the honeymoon phase but I have to say it looks like it's going to be my all-time favorite. Either I am getting deafer from shunning ear protection all these years or this Triton is the quietest router I have ever used and that's only the begging of the positive aspects I have noted thus far.
Joe
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I was at the Busy Bee store tonight and picked up the Big Triton but was really liking the little Triton. The big one comes in a cardboard box but the little Triton comes in a nice case with a bunch of accessories. Will there be a big difference between the 2.25 and the 3.25 HP routers? The little Triton was $199 and the big one was $259. Any advice on which one to buy. Should I keep the big Triton or take it back and get the smaller one?
Uuuugh, this is really frustrating.
Dave
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Do not be swayed by the case. As much as I like the router I have to say that the case is a piece of crap. If the plunger is not in the exact position the case WILL NOT close.
Joe
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:
snip

Oh dear! If the budget can stand it, both?
Or one (The Big one?) , and a $39 chinese cheapie that will let you build up some practice with, and you don't worry about abusing? And will still be quite useful for smaller jobs.
Barry
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.